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and truth, and all elements that tend to the realization and perfection of the brotherhood that it is her peculiar mission to insist upon, and illustrate.

"For so the whole round earth, is every way

Bound by golden chains, about the feet of God.""

No report from committee on Foreign Correspondence.

M.. W.. Bro. Martin H. Rice was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. John M. Bramwell was elected Grand Secretary.

IOWA.

This Grand met in annual communication at Des Moines, June 2d, 1868, M.. W.. Grand Master Reuben Mickel, presiding.

Two hundred and thirty-two chartered and seven U. D. were represented, with an aggregate membership of 9,774. The work of the past year was: Initiated, 1,467; passed, 1,327; raised, 1,265.

The Grand Master's address is confined to local matters.

There is no report from the committee on Foreign Correspondence. From the address of the Grand Orator we would gladly make extracts, could we do so without in a measure destroying its beauty, and want of room forbids its entire insertion.

M.. W.. Bro. Reuben Mickel was re-elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. T. S. Parvin, Grand Secretary.

IDAHO TERRITORY.

This Grandheld its first annual communication at Idaho City, June 22, 1868. Four chartered and one U. D. □ represented.

M.. W.. Geo. H. Coe was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. P. E. Edmondson, Grand Secretary.

KANSAS.

This Grand ☐ met in annual communication at Lawrence, October 20, 1868; M.. W.. Grand Master M. S. Adams, presiding.

Forty-eight subordinate were represented, with a total membership of 2,645. The work of the past year was: Initiated, 435; passed, 385; raised, 361.

The Grand Master's address relates to local matters only. The following is one of the many decisions of the Grand Master during the year:

"I hold the correct rule to be, that candidates rejected in another State cannot legally be made Masons in this State, without the consent of the proper authorities where the rejection occurred. According to some of the old Constitutions, no could 'initiate into the mysteries of the craft any person whomsoever, without being satisfied, by test or otherwise, that the candidate has not made application to any other and been rejected.' In my judgment, before the candidate for the mysteries of Masonry is admitted into the □, he should satisfy the brethren, by a declaration made on his honor as a man, that he has never made application to any other for the degrees of Masonry and been rejected; or, if rejected, the consent

of the so rejecting should always be obtained before the degrees are conferred."

The report of the committee on Foreign Correspondence is a review in brief of the proceedings of thirty-five Grand bodies, including those of Colorado.

M.. W.. Bro. J. H. Brown was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. E. T. Carr was elected Grand Secretary.

KENTUCKY.

This Grand held its annual communication at Louisville, October 19, M.. W.. Grand Master Elisha S. Fitch, presiding.

1868;

Three hundred and five chartered and fifteen U. D. represented. Aggregate membership, 18,972. Work of the year: Initiated, 2,070. The address of the Grand Master is quite lengthy, and is devoted principally to matters concerning that jurisdiction.

The report of the committee on Foreign Correspondence is short, reviewing concisely the proceedings of thirty-one Grand bodies.

M.. W.. Bro. Elisha S. Fitch was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. J. M. S. McCorkle, Grand Secretary.

LOUISIANA.

This Grand met in annual communication at New Orleans, February 8, 1869; M.. W.. Grand Master Henry R. Swasey, presiding.

Ninety-four chartered and four U. D. represented. Aggregate membership, 6,099. Work of the year: Initiated, 602; passed, 518; raised, 490. The Grand Master's address treats almost exclusively of local matters. The report of the committee on Foreign Correspondence is lengthy, ably reviewing the proceedings of thirty-nine Grand bodies. Want of space forbids us making copious extracts.

M.. W.. Bro. Samuel M. Todd was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. James C. Batchelor, Grand Secretary.

MASSACHUSETTS.

This Grand met in annual communication at Boston, December 9, 1868; M.. W.. Grand Master Charles C. Dana, presiding.

One hundred and seventy-one were represented, with a total membership of 18,364. Work of the year: 2,094 persons made Masons.

The address of the Grand Master is devoted exclusively to local matters. There is no report on Foreign Correspondence.

M.. W.. Bro. William Sewall Gardner was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. Solon Thornton, Grand Secretary.

MAINE.

This Grand met in annual communication at Portland, May 4, 1869; M.. W.. Grand Master Timothy J. Murray, presiding.

One hundred and forty-eight were represented, with an aggregate

membership of 14,121. Work of the year was: 1,343 persons made Masons. The Grand Master's address deals in home matters to the exclusion of all else.

The committee on Foreign Correspondence acknowledge the receipt of the proceedings of forty-four Grand

M.. W.. Bro. John H. Lynde was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. Ira Berry, Grand Secretary.

MARYLAND.

This Grand met in annual communication at Baltimore, November 16th, 1868, M.. W.. Grand Master John Coates presiding.

Fifty-three subordinate

ship of 4,609.

were represented, with an aggregate member

The work of the year was: 458 persons made Masons.

The address of the M.. W.. Grand Master treats only of home matters. The committee on Foreign Correspondence made an extended report, reviewing the proceedings of forty-one Grand □, including Colorado.

M.. W.. Bro. A. T. Metcalf was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. James Fenton Grand Secretary.

MICHIGAN.

This Grand met in annual communication at Detroit, January 13th, 1869, M.. W.. Grand Master S. C. Coffinbury, presiding.

Two hundred and thirty-four subordinate were represented, with an aggregate membership of 18,016. The work of the year was: 2,337 persons made Masons.

The following we clip from the Grand Master's address: "Brethren of the Grand

:

"This Grand body has again met under the most auspicious and congratulatory circumstances. The working-tools of our order have been actively employed in our jurisdiction since we last met in annual communication, and our labors have been crowned with signal success and flattering rewards. Peace has prevailed within our mystic precincts, and harmony rests on our sacred altars. Many new members have been added to our brotherhood by initiation within the year, which shows an increasing respect for our order among the intelligent of our fellow-men, and that the more Masonry, its objects, its aims, its pretensions, and its effects, are discussed and agitated by its enemies, the more favorably it impresses itself upon the moral sentiment of the age. It has been observed that the accessions to our order during the last year, and, perhaps, a part of the preceding year, have been, as a general thing, a high order of men, embracing not only some who are deservedly distinguished for their prominence as citizens and members of society, but who are justly eminent for their moral stability and pure integrity. The active business men, the worthy mechanics and laborers, the professional classes, the youth and the middle aged, have long been seeking the peaceful asylum of our order; but recently the

more aged philosopher, the gray-haired moralist, and the profound thinker, have sought our school of ethics. Men who have struggled through professional, political, and pecuniary conflicts, with honor, seek our temple, sit down at our altar, and breathe freely in its atmosphere of pure morals, as they rest from their protracted struggle of life, giving dignity to Masonry, while they become useful laborers among us."

Also, the following:

"Intemperate habits in the use of strong drinks among our brothers ought to be severely punished by our. There is no excuse or palliation that can now be offered for it; and I trust that, in a short time, drunkenness will be unknown among Masons. Our order owes it to mankind, as well as to herself as a moral institution, to wash her hands before the world of these plague spots, so incompatible with her professions of moral purity. Drunkenness in a Mason is such a compromise with dignity, manhood, and individual sovereignty, as to render its victim entirely unworthy of the title of Freemason. No man can be free who is a slave to his passions, his lusts, or his appetites. True manhood, the spirit of freedom, and the force of independence, are manifested in openly meeting our seducing lusts, appetites and passions, and without aid from others, but by force of our own moral will, wrestling with, and conquering them. In the victory over his own passions, by force of his own will, is embodied the true greatness of virtue. He who has met himself in such a conflict, who has battled with himself, and has arisen, freed from moral bondage, may well be called a Freemason, and may well claim our highest approval and commendation. But, when all mankind are growing wiser and better, and when our institution is tendering her aid, as a moral instrument in the great work of humanity, the brother who will embarrass her efforts, reproach her good name and bring her into shame and scandal by his drunkenness and immorality, is unworthy the honored title of Freemason."

The committee on Foreign Correspondence review in brief the proceedings of thirty-eight Grand.

M.. W.. Bro. A. T. Metcalf was elected Grand Master, and R.. W.. Bro. James Fenton Grand Secretary.

MISSISSIPPI.

This Grand met in annual communication at Jackson, January 18, 1869; M.. W.. Grand Master Thos. S. Gathright, presiding.

One hundred and eighty-two subordinate were represented, with a total membership of 9,606. The work of the year was: Initiated, 714; passed, 586; raised, 578.

From the opening of the Grand Master's address we take the following: "Brethren of the Grand

:

"It is a distinguished mark of the Divine favor that permits us to come together at this time. Into the twelve months that have passed away since we last met in Grand annual communication, there has crowded as much of bitter disappointment and sorrow, suspense and anxiety, as has

filled the measure of any other period of equal extent in the annals of this Grand. Our people have been chastened; and but for the promise made specially to them, the lengthened shadows of coming events, now falling around them, would inspire anything but hope. Our brethren constitute the great body of the intelligent citizenship in the commonwealth, and when we say our people are chastised, we may listen for the cry of Masons in distress. The war draped all our door-posts with mourning, and planted weeds upon our hearth-stones. The losses in property, resulting from the war, impoverished our land. With an energy isolated and peculiar to our race, our brethren, oppressed by past results, but hopeful for the future, began to struggle for a competency. During the last year, many of them reached the crisis of their pecuniary obligations, to find the proceeds of a year's labor inadequate to give relief.

"Many of our most beloved and distinguished brethren have staggered under their burdens, are stooping to receive more, while others have shaken off the debris of former prosperity, and girded themselves for a new career. Brethren, it is a time to trust in God.

"In seasons of prosperity, and in times of political harmony and good fellowship, it was delightful to assemble once a year in Grand □ and counsel together, and enjoy for a few brief days that charming fraternal communion known only among Masons. It was sweet then. How much more so now! How much does even the anticipation of a reunion soften the rigor of our cares during the passing year! How much more than heretofore does it suggest itself to us, as a special blessing, to assemble and commune with each other?"

As a matter of general Masonic interest, we clip the following from the report of the committee on Foreign Correspondence :

"We clip the following account of negro, their origin and true status, from the proceedings of New York, and which are credited, by the committee, to Bro. Bokkolen. We make no apology for its insertion, as it supplies a page in Masonic history on a subject eliciting a very general interest at present, and cannot fail to command a careful perusal :

"HISTORY OF NEGRO LODGES.

"In 1784, certain colored persons residing in Boston petitioned the Grand Master of England for a charter. The charter, dated September 29, 1784, was granted to Prince Hall, Boston Smith, Thomas Sanderson and several others, all colored men, under the name of African □, No. 459. The charter, however, was not received in Boston till the year 1787. It was an ordinary charter, in the usual form, and conferred no other privileges than those usually granted by such instruments. Of its proceedings from this time until 1827, we have no definite information, at which time we find it actively at work under the Mastership of Mr. John T. Hilton, claiming the powers and prerogatives of a Grand, under the name of Prince Hall Grand □ of Ancient York Masonry, which powers it must have assumed as early as 1812, in which year it is said to have granted a

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