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LITTELL'S LIVING AGE.

PROSPECTUS. This work is conducted in the spirit of Littell's Museum of Foreign Literature, (which was favorably received by the public for twenty years,) but as it is twice as large, and appears so often, we not only give spirit and freshness to it by many things which were excluded by a month's delay, but while thus extending our scope and gathering a greater and more attractive variety, are able so to increase the solid and substantial part of our literary, historical, and political harvest, as fully to satisfy the wants of the American reader.

The elaborate and stately Essays of the Edinburgh, Quarterly, and other Reviews; and Blackwood's noble criticisms on Poetry, his keen political Commentaries, highly wrought Tales, and vivid descriptions of rural and mountain Scenery; and the contributions to Literature, History, and Common Life, by the sagacious Spectator, the sparkling Examiner, the judicious Athenæum, the busy and industrious Literary Gazette, the sensible and comprehensive Britannia, the sober and respectable Christian Observer; these are intermixed with the Military and Naval reminiscences of the United Service, and with the best articles of the Dublin University, New Monthly, Fraser's, Tait's, Ainsworth's, Hood's, and Sporting Maguzines, and of Chambers' admirable Journal. We do not consider it beneath our dignity to borrow wit and wisdom from Punch; and, when we think it good enough, make use of the thunder of The Times. We shall increase our variety by importations from the continent of Europe, and from the new growth of the British colonies.

The steamship has brought Europe, Asia, and Africa, into our neighborhood; and will greatly multiply our connections, as Merchants, Travellers, and Politicians, with all parts of the world; so that much more than ever it

now becomes every intelligent American to be of the condition and changes of foreign countr this not only because of their nearer connection selves, but because the nations seem to be t through a rapid process of change, to some nes things, which the merely political prophet canno or foresee.

Geographical Discoveries, the progress of Cole (which is extending over the whole world,) and and Travels, will be favorite matter for our se and, in general, we shall systematically and acquaint our readers with the great department affairs, without entirely neglecting our own. While we aspire to make the Living Age de all who wish to keep themselves informed of progress of the movement-to Statesmen, Div yers, and Physicians-to men of business a leisure-it is still a stronger object to make it and useful to their Wives and Children. We t we can thus do some good in our day and r and hope to make the work indispensable in informed family. We say indispensable, becz day of cheap literature it is not possible to gua the influx of what is bad in taste and vicious in any other way than by furnishing a sufficient a healthy character. The mental and mora must be gratified.

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We hope that, by "winnowing the wheat chaff," by providing abundantly for the imagin by a large collection of Biography, Voyages, a History, and more solid matter, we may prod which shall be popular, while at the same ti aspire to raise the standard of public taste.

TERMS.-The LIVING AGE is published every Satur- Agencies. We are desirous of making arr day, by E. LITTELL & Co., corner of Tremont and Brom-in all parts of North America, for increasing t field sts., Boston; Price 12 cents a number, or six dollars tion of this work-and for doing this a liberal a year in advance. Remittances for any period will be will be allowed to gentlemen who will interest thankfully received and promptly attended to. To in the business. And we will gladly corresp insure regularity in mailing the work, orders should be subject with any agent who will send us undo addressed to the office of publication, as above. Clubs, paying a year in advance, will be supplied as follows:

Four copies for
Nine 66
Twelve " "

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Complete sets, in twenty-four volumes, to the end of March, 1850, handsomely bound, packed in neat boxes, and delivered in all the principal cities, free of expense of freight, are for sale at forty-eight dollars.

Any volume may be had separately at two dollars, bound, or a dollar and a half in numbers.

Any number may be had for 12 cents; and it may be worth while for subscribers or purchasers to complete any broken volumes they may have, and thus greatly enhance their value.

Binding. We bind the work in a uniform, strong, and good style; and where customers bring their numbers in good order, can generally give them bound volumes in exchange without any delay. The price of the binding is 50 cents a volume. As they are always bound to one pattern, there will be no difficulty in matching the future volumes.

ences.

Postage. When sent with the cover on, t Age consists of three sheets, and is rated as a at 4 cents. But when sent without the cover within the definition of a newspaper given and cannot legally be charged with more than postage, (1 ets.) We add the definition allu

A newspaper is "any printed publication numbers, consisting of not more than two published at short, stated intervals of not me month, conveying intelligence of passing ever

Monthly parts.-For such as prefer it in the Living Age is put up in monthly parts, contai five weekly numbers. In this shape it sho advantage in comparison with other works, co each part double the matter of any of the But we recommend the weekly numbers as fuller of life. Postage on the monthly parts cents. The volumes are published quarterly. containing as much matter as a quarterly rev. eighteen months. E. LITTELL & CO.,

WASHINGTON, 27 I

Of all the Periodical Journals devoted to literature and science hich abound in Europe and in this has appeared to me the most useful. It contains indeed the exposition only of the current literature of language, but this, by its immense extent and comprehension, includes a portraiture of the human mind expansion of the present age.

J. Q.

WORKS PUBLISHED AT THE OFFICE OF THE LIVING

THE STORY OF A FAMILY, by the Author of "The Maiden Aunt"—27
THE MAIDEN AND MARRIED LIFE OF MARY POWELL MILTON 12
FEATS ON THE FIORD, A Story of Norway, by Miss Martineau 25

THE MAIN AUNT, by S. M.- 25 Cents.

THE MODERN VASSALA Story of Poland 25 Cents.

AGE.

elligent American
anges of foreign
their nearer come
#nations seem
of change, to s
y political propheta
-ries, the progres
er the whole world.
vorite matter for
all systematically
h the great departe
neglecting our on
make the Living
hemselves informes
Ent-to Statesman!
to men of basies
onger object to a
s and Children.
good in our day n
work indispensa
say indispensalier
it is not possible:
d in taste and ne
y furnishing a sufi
The mental and

winnowing the th undantly for the Biography, Voye matter, we mat , while at the s dard of public tast

Hesirous of making merica, for increas For doing this a libe emen who will inte

we will gladly com who will send us

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riage.] Pozen, 1842. 1 vol. 8vo.

5. Mystini ozyli Caloksrtall Loiki Narodowe of Thinking, or System of National Logic. By the Pozen, 1844.

2 vols.

6. Urywki Polityorne. [Political Fragments.] Pa 1845. 1 vol. 8vo.

THE Polish nation possessed, during a thousand years, a larger country than modern France, between the Baltic, the Black Sea, and the Carpathian Mountains. There civilization and learning flourished brighter than elsewhere, in the 15th and 16th centuries, under the free institutions and wise government of the Jagellon dynasty. They sheltered, by their protective shield, numerous families which were persecuted, on account of religious and political freedom, in the rest of Europe. They served as a bulwark against the frequent encroachments of the Asiatic hordes, while Europe wanted to organize herself and develop her civilization and military power. This Polish nation exists no more as a body politic.

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660568

MASSACHUSETTS QUARTERLY REVIEW.

NO. XI.-JUNE, 1850.

ARTICLE I. ON THE NEW TENDENCY OF THE
POLISH-SLAVONIAN PHILOSOPHY.

1. Grundlage der Universellen Philosophie. [Prin
ciples of the Universal Philosophy. By Bronislas Ferdi-
nand. Karlsruhe, 1837. 1 vol. 8vo.

2. Norstudien zur Wissenchaft der Natur. Trentowski.

Von

[Introduction to the Studies of Natural

Sciences.] Leipzig, 1840. 2 vols. 8vo.

3. Chowanna ezyli System Pedagogiki Narodowej. [Education, or System of National Pedagogy. By the same.] Pozen, 1842. 4 vols. 8vo.

4. Aforyzmy o Matzeristwie. [Aphorisms about Marriage.] Pozen, 1842. 1 vol. 8vo.

5. Mystini ozyli Caloksrtall Loiki Narodowej. [Art of Thinking, or System of National Logic. By the same.] Pozen, 1844. 2 vols.

6. Urywki Polityorne. [Political Fragments.] Paris, 1845. 1 vol. 8vo.

THE Polish nation possessed, during a thousand years, a larger country than modern France, between the Baltic, the Black Sea, and the Carpathian Mountains. There civilization and learning flourished brighter than elsewhere, in the 15th and 16th centuries, under the free institutions and wise government of the Jagellon dynasty. They sheltered, by their protective shield, numerous families which were persecuted, on account of religious and political freedom, in the rest of Europe. They served as a bulwark against the frequent encroachments of the Asiatic hordes, while Europe wanted to organize herself and develop her civilization and military power. This Polish nation exists no more as a body politic.

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