Puslapio vaizdai
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P. 325.-134.29.
Buck. Lord cardinal, I will follow Eleanor,
And listen after Humphrey, how he proceeds :
She's tickled now; her fume can need no spurs,

She'll gallop fast enough to her destruction.
I heartily agree with Mr. Steevens.

P. 335.-144.—44.
Glo. Churchmen so hot? good uncle, hide such malice;

With such holiness can you do it ? The negative proposed by Warburton appears to me to be necessary to the sense; the verse will still remain defective.

P. 365.-173.-85.
Suf. No; let him die, in that he is a fox,
By nature prov'd an enemy to the flock,
Before his chaps be stain'd with crimson blood;

As Humphrey, prou'd by reasons, to my liege.
I think the reading proposed by Sir Thomas
Hanmer, and supported by Mr. M. Mason, should
be received.

P. 371.-180.-94.
K. Hen. I thank thee, Margaret ; these words content

me much.

I think Mr. Theobald's correction ought to be retained.

P. 386.-194.115. Q. Mar. Ah me! what is this world ? what news are these ? But wherefore grieve I at an hour's poor loss, Omitting Suffolk's exile, my soul's treasure ?

I think Malone's is the right explanation.

P. 390.-199.-121.
Cap. The gaudy, blabbing, and remorseful day

Is crept into the bosom of the sea.
Perhaps Milton remembered this epithet in
Comus :

66 Ere the blabbing eastern scout,
The nice morn on the Indian steep
From her cabin’d loop-hole peep,
And to the tell-tale sun descry
Our conceal'd solemnity.

P. 391.-200.-122.
And now loud-howling wolves arouse the jades
That drag the tragick melancholy night;
Who with their drowsy, slow, and flagging wings
Clip dead mens' graves,

and from their misty jaws
Breathe foul contagious darkness in the air.

I do not understand the meaning of the verb clip in this place.

P. 425.-236.-176.
Iden. As for more words, whose greatness answers words,
Let this

my
sword

report what speech forbears.
I
say

with Mr. Steevens, 6. How an unnecessary addition ?”

P. 425.-237.-177.
Iden. Is't Cade that I have slain, that monstrous traitor?
Sword, I will hallow thee for this thy deed,
And hang thee o'er my tomb, when I am dead.

I think there is not much in Mr. Steevens's objection : Iden means that he would direct the sword to be hung over his tomb, when he was dead. Shakespeare frequently uses expressions more harsh and licentious than this.

1

THE THIRD PART OF

KING HENRY THE SIXTH.

J. and S. 1785.

Vol. vi.

MALONE.
Vol. VI.

J. and S. 1793.

Vol. x.

P. 450.-267.-219.
K. Hen.

Why faint you, lords?
My title's good, and better far than his.

War. But prove it, Henry, and thou shalt be king.
I agree

with Mr. Steevens.

P. 452.-268.220.
K. Hen. My lord of Warwick, hear me but one word.
I prefer the reading of the 3d folio, and the
subsequent editors.

P. 453.-269.— 222.
And neither by treason, nor hostility,

To seek to put me down, and reign thyself. I am in the same ignorance that Mr. Steevens is. The word and should, I think, be omitted.

P. 456.-272.--226.
Revengd may she be on that hateful duke;
Whose haughty spirit, winged with desire,
Will cost my crown, and, like an empty eagle,
Tire on the flesh of

my

son! I think cost is right, and rightly explained by Mr. Malone.

me, and of

P. 458.-274.–229.
York. I took an oath, that he should quietly reign.
Edw. But, for a kingdom, any oath may be broken.

Si violandum est jus, regnandi gratiâ violandum est : aliis rebus pietatem colas.

Cic. de Officiis, L. 3. $ 21.

P. 459.-275.-231.
York. You, Edward, shall unto my lord Cobham,
With whom the Kentish men will willingly rise :
In them I trust; for they are soldiers,
Witty, courteous, liberal, full of spirit.

I think we should read witty and courteous.

P. 486.-281.-271.
Edw. A wisp of straw were worth a thousand.crowns,

To make this shameless callet know herself. Shakespeare has likewise used the word callet again in Othello (Act. IV.)

He call’d her whore; a beggar in his drink,
Could not have laid such terms upon his callet.

P. 496.-289.-283.
K. Hen. So many years ere I shall sheer the fleece:
So minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, and

years,
Pass'd over to the end they were created,

Would bring white hairs unto a quiet grave. I

agree with Mr. Steevens.

P. 510.-302.-305. 1 Keep. We charge you, in Gods' name, and in the king's, To with us unto the officers.

go

I think Mr. Steevens has done rightly.

I think the same of what he has afterwards done in this scene, P. 515.-308.-312. She looks sad.

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