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BRIEF SKETCH OF DR. WATTS.

DR. ISAAC WATTS, a learned and eminent dissenting minis ter, was born at Southampton, 1674, of parents remarkable for piety and virtue. From his infancy, he discovered a strong propensity to learning; and was early distinguished for the sprightliness of his wit; which, even in the years of younger life, was regulated by a deep sense of religion. At the school at Southampton, he was taught Latin, Greek, and Hebrew; and in 1690 was sent to an academy in London, to complete his education. His tutor declared that during the whole time of his tuition at this academy, he was not only so inoffensive as never to give occasion for reproof; but so exemplary that he often proposed him as a pattern to his other pupils.

In 1696, he was invited by Sir John Hartopp, to reside in his family at Stoke Newington, as tutor to his son. Here he continued about four years: and acquitted himself with fidelity and reputation. Believing it to be his duty, he determined to devote his life to the pastoral office, of the Importance of which, he had a deep sense upon his mind. He began to preach on his birth-day, 1695, when he had completed his 34th year; and be met with general acceptance.

In 1712, he had a severe fever, which, by its violence and continuance, reduced him so much that he never perfectly recovered. The languishing state of his health drew upon him the attention of Sir Thomas Abney, who received him into his house; where, with a constancy of friendship and uniformity of conduct not often to be found, he was treated for thirty six years, with all the kindness that friendship could prompt, and all the attention that respect could dictate. From the time of his reception in this family, his life was no otherwise diversified than by successive labours for the good of mankind; the number nud variety of which show the inrenseness of his industry, and the extent of his capacity. In 1728, the universities of Edinburgh and Aberdeen, without his knowledge, conferred on him the degree of Doctor of Divinity.

Has writings are so numerous, that in this sketch we cannot even give a list of them. They were collected and published in 1754, in 6 vols. quarto. His Lyric Poems, his Psalms and Hymns, and his Divine Songs for children, are a sufficient proof of his poetical talents. They have bad an amazing number of editions. His treatise on Logic, a masterly performance, has been long used in the most distingished seminaries His Improvement of the Mind" is an excellent work, which may be recommended to all young persons.

This worthy and exemplary man became, towards the end of his days, so infirm that he was confined to his chamber and his bed, where he was worn gradually away, without pain, till be expired in the 75th year of his age.

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remarkable for ered a strong pro ed for the sprightli ounger life, was reool at Southampton, in (690 was sent to ucation. His tutor de uition at this academy, give occasion for reposed him as a pattern rtopp, to reside in his fam

s son.

Here he continued

f with fidelity and reputa etermined to devote his life ance of which, he had a deep O preach on his birth-day, 1696, ear; and he met with general which, by its violence and conthat he never perfectly recovered. th drew upon him the attention of ed him into his house; where, with niformity of conduct not often to irty six years, with all the kindness , and all the attention that respect of his reception in this family, its ed than by successive labours for the er and variety of which show the ind the extent of his capacity. In 1728, urgh and Aberdeen, without his knowhe degree of Doctor of Divinity. merous, that in this sketch we cannot They were collected and published in His Lyric Poems, his Psalms and Hymns, for children, are a sufficient proof of his have had an amazing number of editions. , a masterly performance, has been long ished seminarie His "Improvement of llent work, which may be recommended to

xemplary man became, towards the end of his be was confined to his chamber and his bed, gradually away, without pain, till he expired of his age.

Page

35 Lord, I am vile, conceiv'd i

30 Lord, I can suffer
31 Lord, I esteem thy
166 Lord, if thine eyes-
277 Lord if thou dost not soon
263 Lord, I have made
246 Lord, in the morning
Lord, I will bless thee

269 Lord, I would spread

269 Lord, of the worlds above 1

59 Lord, thou hast call'd

74 Lord, thou hast heard
300 Lord, thou hast search'd 2

I love the Lord, he heard 236 Lord, thou hast seen

I'll speak the honours
In all my vast concerns
In anger, Lord, rebuke
In God's own house
In Judah God of old
Into thine hand, O God
I set the Lord before
Is there ambition
It is the Lord our
I waited patient
I will extol thee, Lord,

JJesus, our Lord,

EHOVAH reigns;

96 Lord, thou wilt hear
289 Lord, 'tis a pleasant
18 Lord, we have heard

311 Lord, what a feeble

155 Lord, what a thoughtless 1

65 Lord, what is man, poor 2

37 Lord, what was man

273 Lord, when I count
206 Lord, when thou didst
88 Loud hallelujahs to the
64 Lo! what a glorious
Lo, what an everlasting 21

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