The Pastime of Pleasure: An Allegorical Poem, 18 tomas

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Percy Society, 1845 - 220 psl.
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141 psl. - ... longe, White as the milke, with blew vaynes among. Her fete proper, she gartered well her hose, I never saw so swete a creature; Nothing she lacketh as I do suppose, That is longing to fayre dame Nature; Yet more over her countenaunce so pure, So swete, so lovely, wold my hert inspyre, Wyth fervent love to attayne his desyre. But what for her maners passeth all, She is both gentyll, good, and vertuous; Alas! what fortune did me to her call Without that she be to me piteous? With her so fettered...
210 psl. - These two the worlde dampned in certaynete, By disobedience so foule and vycyate; And all other than frome them generate, Tyll peace and mercy made right to enclyne Out of the Lyon to enter the Vyrgyne. Lyke as the worlde was distroyed totally By the virgins sone, so it semed well A virgins sone to redeme it pyteously, Whose hye Godheed in the chosen vessell Forty wekes naturally did dwell. Nature wekes naturally dyd good of kynde, In the vyrgyn he dyd suche nature fynde. Thus wythout nature nature...
195 psl. - Pucell me sente, Agaynst my wedding, of the satyn fyne, Whyte as the milke, a goodly garment, Branded with perle that clerely did shyne; And so the mariage for to determyne Venus me brought to a ryall chappell, Which of fyne golde was wrought every dele. And after that the gay and glorious La Belle Pucell to the chappell was ledde, In a white vesture fayre and precious, Wyth a golden chaplet on her yalow hede; And Lex Ecclesie did me to her wedde; After which wedding there was a great feast, Nothing...
15 psl. - In stede of grapes the rubies there did shyne. The flore was paved with berall clarified, With pillers made of stones precious, Like a place of pleasure so gayely glorified, , It might be called a palaice glorious, So muche delectable and solacious.
173 psl. - Ye must put in ure This daye your power, in honour to endure, Against this gyaunt your mortall enemy. Be of good cheare, you shall have victory. Besydes this gyaunt, upon every tree I did se hang many a goodly shelde Of noble knyghtes, that were of hye degre, Whiche he had slayne and murdred in the fielde. From farre this gyaunt I ryght well behelde; And towarde hym as I rode my waye, On his first head I sawe a banner gay...
146 psl. - Age of his cours must at the last transporte: Now trouth of his right dooth our selfe exhorte That you your youth in ydelnes wyll spende, Wythouten pleasure to bryng it to an ende. What was the cause of your creacion, But man to love, the world to multeply? As to sow the sede of generacion, Wyth fervent love so well conveniently, The cause of love engendreth perfytely, Upon an entent of dame Nature, Which you have made so fayre a creature. Than of dame Nature what is the entent But to accomplyshe...
48 psl. - And on what ymage he his matter found. If to the oratour many a sundry tale, One after other, treatably be tolde, Than sundry ymages in his closed male Eche for a mater he doth than well holde, Lyke to the tale he doth than so beholde, And inwarde a recapitulacyon, Of eche ymage the moralazacyon. Whiche be the tales he grounded pryvely Upon these ymages...
33 psl. - We ordre it for to be ryght stable, And than we never begyn our sentement, Recityng letters not convenient, But thys commutacion shoulde be refused, Wythout cause or thynge make it be used. Thys that I wryte is harde and covert To them that have nothynge intelligence; Up so downe they make oft transvert, Or that they can knowe, they experience Of thys craft and facundious science, By dysposicion the rethorician To make lawes ordinatly began. Wythout disposicion none ordre gan be, For the disposicion...
51 psl. - Our vyces to dense; his depared stremes Kyndlynge our hertes wyth the fyry lemes Of moral vertue, as is probable In all hys bokes so swete and profytable. The boke of fame, which is sentencyous, He drewe hym selfe on hys own invencyon; And than the tragidyes so pytous Of the xix. ladyes, was his translacyon; And upon hys ymaginacyon He made also the tales of Caunterbury; Some vertuous, and some glad and mery. And of Troylus the pytous dolour For his lady Cresyde, full of doublenes, He did bewayle...
44 psl. - Hawes, who takes Lydgate as his model. To quote from Hawes: . . . my mayster Lydgate veryfyde The depured rethoryke in Englysh language; To. make our tongue so clerely puryfyed That the vyle termes should nothing arage As like a pye ['magpie'] to chatter in a cage, But for to speke with rethoryke formally.10 The amount of artifice in the aureate style of fifteenthcentury British poets is at once apparent.