The Castles of England: Their Story and Structure, 1 tomas

Priekinis viršelis
Macmillan Company, 1896
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271 psl. - My loving people, we have been persuaded by some that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit ourselves to armed multitudes, for fear of treachery. But I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful and loving people.
271 psl. - I am come amongst you, as you see, at this time, not for my recreation and disport, but being resolved, in the midst and heat of the battle, to live or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my honour and my blood, even in the dust. I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too...
271 psl. - Let tyrants fear. I have always so behaved myself that, under God, I have placed my chiefest strength and safeguard in the loyal hearts and goodwill of my subjects...
271 psl. - ... but, by your obedience to my general, by your concord in the camp, and your valour in the field, we shall shortly have a famous victory over those enemies of my God, of my kingdom, and of my people.
271 psl. - I know I have the body but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king — and of a king of England too — and think foul scorn that Parma, or Spain, or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm.
125 psl. - Death is there associated, not, as in Westminster Abbey and St Paul's, with genius and virtue, with public veneration and with imperishable renown; not, as in our humblest churches and churchyards, with everything that is most endearing in social and domestic charities; but with whatever is darkest in human nature and in human destiny, with the savage triumph of implacable enemies, with the inconstancy, the ingratitude, the cowardice of friends, with all the miseries of fallen greatness and of blighted...
195 psl. - We stormed, this morning, after six of the clock : the signal for falling on was the firing four of our cannon ; which being done, our men fell on with great resolution and cheerfulness. We took the two Houses without any considerable loss to ourselves. Colonel Pickering stormed the New House, passed through, and got the gate of the Old House ; whereupon they summoned a parley, which our men would not hear. In the...
262 psl. - The king started a little, and said, " By my faith, my lord, I thank you for my " good cheer, but I may not endure to have my laws " broken in my sight; my attorney must speak with
271 psl. - Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm; to which rather than any dishonour should grow by me, I myself will take up arms, I myself will be your general, judge, and rewarder of every one of your virtues in the field. I know already...
262 psl. - My lord, I have heard much of your hospitality, but I see it is greater than the speech. These handsome gentlemen and yeomen, which I see on both sides of me, are sure your menial servants.

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