President Garfield and Education: Hiram College Memorial

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J. R. Osgood and Company, 1881 - 433 psl.
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115 psl. - I am distressed for thee, my brother Jonathan : Very pleasant hast thou been unto me : Thy love to me was wonderful, Passing the love of women.
200 psl. - Promote, then, as an object of primary importance, institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of a government gives force to public opinion, it is essential that public opinion should be enlightened.
408 psl. - The death of a dear friend, wife, brother, lover, which seemed nothing but privation, somewhat later assumes the aspect of a guide or genius ; for it commonly operates revolutions in our way of life, terminates an epoch of infancy or of youth which was waiting to be closed, breaks up a wonted occupation, or a household, or style of living, and allows the formation of new ones more friendly to the growth of character.
127 psl. - I am not the thing you kiss; Cease your tears, and let it lie; It was mine, it is not I.
230 psl. - You are surprised to learn that I have not a high opinion of Mr. Jefferson, and I am surprised at your surprise. I am certain that I never wrote a line, and that I never, in Parliament, in conversation, or even on the hustings — a place where it is the fashion to court the populace — uttered a word indicating an opinion that the supreme authority in a state ought to be intrusted to the majority of citizens told by the head; in other words, to the poorest and most ignorant part of society.
243 psl. - Next in importance to freedom and justice, is popular education, without which neither freedom nor justice can be permanently maintained.
232 psl. - I have seen England pass three or four times through such critical seasons as I have described. Through such seasons the United States will have to pass in the course of the next century, if not of this. How will you pass through them ? I heartily wish you a good deliverance. But my reason and my wishes are at war, and I cannot help foreboding the •worst.
240 psl. - Mated with a squalid savage — what to me were sun or clime! I the heir of all the ages, in the foremost files of time...
164 psl. - SEC. 3. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Education to present annually to Congress a report embodying the results of his investigations and labors, together with a statement of such facts and recommendations as will, in his judgment, subserve the purpose for which this department is established.
383 psl. - ... bring all Heaven before mine eyes. And may at last my weary age Find out the peaceful hermitage, The hairy gown and mossy cell, Where I may sit and rightly spell Of every star that heaven doth shew, And every herb that sips the dew, Till old experience do attain To something like prophetic strain. These pleasures, Melancholy, give; And I with thee will choose to live.

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