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SEVENTH SERIES
VOLUME XLIV.

No. 3391 July 3, 1909.

FROM BEGINNING
Vol. CCLXII.

1.

II. III.

3 18

24

IV.

CONTENTS
Swinburne: Personal Recollections. By Edmund Gosse

FORTNIGHTLY REVIEW
New Signs in Russia. By Frederick Rennet NATIONAL REVIEW
Saleh : A Sequel. Chapters XVII and XVIII. By Hugh Clifford.
(To be continued.)

BLACKWOOD's MAGAZINE
Wildfowl and Parlakimedi. By Edmund Candler

CORNHILL MAGAZINE
A Man of Impulse. By St. John Hankin ENGLISH REVIEW
A Poet of the Northumbrian Pits. By John F. Runciman

SATURDAY REVIEW
A Children's Pageant.

NATION
Parlor Socialists.

OUTLOOK
The Builders,

PUNCA
* These Three "

ACADEMY
The Lesser Affections.

SPECTATOR

V. VI.

29 36

VII. VIII. IX.

46 49 52 55 57 60

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fanned, The English Review.

Then, when day closes and the tired

arms fall, When slumber creeps round eyelids un

awarc, To breathe at last a sudden, vehement

prayer,
One prayer for all!

Osman Eduards.

SWINBURNE: PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS.

Men who to-day have not passed structed of several elements. It was middle age can scarcely form an im- built up on the legend of his mystepression of what the name and fame of rious and unprecedented appearance, Algernon Charles Swinburne meant of the astonishing verbal beauty of bis forty years ago to those who were then writings, but most of all of his deyoung and enthusiastic candidates for fiance of the intellectual and religious apprenticeship in the fine arts. Crit prejudices of his age and generation. icism now looks upon his work-and He was not merely a poet, but a flag; possibly it is right in so looking - and not merely a flag but the Red Flag rather as closing than as opening a incarnate. There was an idea abroad, great poetic era. The conception is of and it was not ill-founded, that in mata talent which collects all the detonat- ters of taste the age in England had ing elements of a previous illumina- for some time been stationary, if not tion, and lets them ott, once and for stagnant. It was necessary to wake all, in a prodigious culminating explo- people up; as Victor Hugo had said: sion, after which darkness ensues. “Il faut rudoyer le genre humain," and But such a conception of Swinburne, in every gesture it was believed that as the floriated termination of the ro- Swinburne set forth to "rudoyer" the mantic edifice, or again to change the Philistines. image, as one who brought up the rear

This was welcome to all young perof a long and straggling army, would sons sitting in bondage, who looked up have seemed to his adorers of 1869 not to Swinburne as to the deliverer. He merely paradoxical but preposterous. also enjoyed, in popular belief, the adIt was not doubted by any of his ad- vantage of excessive youth. In point mirers that here they held an incom- of fact, his immaturity was not parable poet of a new order, “the fair dazzling as was reported by the newsest first-born son of fire," who was to papers, or alas! as he then himself reinaugurate a new age of lyric gold. ported. When Poems and Ballads ap

This conception was shared alike by peared, he was in his thirtieth year, the few who in those days knew him yet he was generally understood to be personally, and by the many who did only twenty-four. This is interesting not. While the present writer was merely because there are five or six still in that outer class, he well remem- years of Swinburne's early manhood bers being told that an audience of which seem to be without any visible the elect to whom Swinburne recited history. What did he do with himself “Dolores," had been moved to such in- between 1860, when The Queen- Mother credible ecstasy by it that several of was still-born, and 1865, when he them had sunk on their knees, theu flashed into universal prominence as and there, and adored him as a god.

the author of Atalanta in Calydon! Those were blissful times, when poets On the large scale, nothing; on the and painters, if they were attached to small scale the bibliographer (aided by Keats' "little clan," might hope for the indefatigable Mr. Thos. J. Wise) honors which were private, indeed, and

detects the review of Baudelaire's strictly limited, but almost divine. Fleurs du Mal in the “Spectator" The extraordinary reputation of Swin- (1862), and a dim sort of short story in burne in the later 'sixties was con- prose, called Dead Lore (1864). No

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doubt this was a time of tremendous Byron left England exactly half a cengrowth in secret; but, visibly, no flame tury before. Then, when the fury of or even smoke was ejected from the the public was at its height, there was crater of the young volcano. Swin- a meeting between Jowett and Mazburne told me

that he wrote the zini, at the house of Mr. George HowBaudelaire in a Turkish bath in Paris. ard (now the Earl of Carlisle), to dis(There were stranger groves of Aca- cuss “what can be done with and for deme than this.) No doubt the biog- Algernon.” And then there came the raphers of the future, intent on rub. dedication to the Republic, “the beabing the gold-dust off the butterfly's con-bright Republic far-off sighted," wings, will tell us everything, day by and all the fervor and intellectual frenday. Meanwhile, these early years con- zies were

successfully diverted from tinue to be delightfully mysterious, "such tendrils as the wild Loves wear” and he was nearly thirty when he to the luminous phantasms of liberty dawned in splendor on London.

and tyrannicide, to the stripping of the Swinburne's second period lasted muffled souls of kings, and to all the from 1865 to 1871. This was the blos- other glorious, generous absurdities of soming-time of the aloe, when its the Mazzini-haunted Songs before Sunacute perfume first filled the literary rise (1871). This was the period when, salons, and then emptied them; when, after an unlucky experience of Lonfor a very short time, the poet emerged don society, the poet fled to the solifrom his life-long privacy and trod the tudes again, and nearly lost his life social stage. The experiment culinin- swimming in the harbor of Etretat. ated, I suppose, in his solitary public The autumn of 1870 saw him once utterance. He might be called “Sin- again in London. It is at this mogle-Speech Swinburne,” since positively ment, when Swinburne was in his his only performance on his legs was thirty-fourth year, that the recollecan after-dinner oration, in May, 1866, tions which I venture to set down bewhen he responded to the toast of "The fore they be forgotten practically beImaginative Literature of England” at gin. They represent the emotional obWillis's Rooms. This, I conjecture, servations of a boy on whom this myswas the occasion, of which I remem- terious and almost symbolical lumiber Browning telling me, when Sala nary turned those full beams which coupled with a toast "the names of were then and afterwards so thriftily the moral (though I cannot say clever) withdrawn from the world at large. Mr. Tupper, and the clever (though I That I may escape as quickly as cannot say moral) Mr. Swinburne." I possible from the necessity of speakbelieve this not unpleasing anecdote to ing for myself, and yet may detail the be ben trovato, but it is quite in the credentials of my reminiscences, let me 1866 manner.

say that my earliest letter from SwinThis second period was brilliant, but burne was dated September 14th, 1867, stormy. Swinburne was constitution- when I was still in my eighteenth ally unfitted to shine in mixed society. year, and that I first saw him about The events in his career now came fast that time, or early in 1868. I was not and thick. The Atalanta, acclaimed in presented to him, however, until the 1865, had been followed later in the last week in 1870, when, in a note same year by Chastelard, which made

from the kind hostess who brought us old men begin to dream dreams, and in together, I find it stated: “Algernon 1866 by Poems and Ballads, which

took to you at once, as is seldom the roused a scandal unparalleled since case with him.” In spite of this happy

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