Puslapio vaizdai
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I am a-fear'd”—“Push on, push on !"
Said the hermit cheerily.
The boat came closer to the ship,
But I nor spake nor stirred;
The boat came close beneath the ship,
And straight a sound was heard.
Under the water it rumbled on,
Still louder and more dread :
It reached the ship, it split the bay;
The ship went down like lead.
Stunn'd by that loud and dreadful sound,
Which sky and ocean smote,
Like one that hath been seven days drown'd
My body lay afloat;
But swift as dreams, myself I found
Within the pilot's boat.
Upon the whirl, where sank the ship,
The boat spun round and round;
And all was still, save that the hill
Was telling of the sound.
I moved my lips—the pilot shriek'd
And fell down in a fit:
The holy hermit raised his eyes,
And pray'd where he did sit.
I took the oars: the pilot's boy,
Who now doth crazy go,
Laughed loud and long, and all the while
His eyes went to and fro,
" Ha! ha!” quoth he, “full plain I see,
The devil knows how to row.
And now, all in my own countree,
I stood on the firm land !
The hermit stepped forth from the boat,
And scarcely he could stand.
O shrieve me, shrieve me, holy man!”
The hermit crossed his brow.

Say quick," quoth he, “I bid thee say-
What manner of man art thou?
Forthwith this frame of mine was wrench'd
With a woful agony,
Which forced me to begin my tale;
And then it left me free.
Since then, at an uncertain hour,
That agony returns :
And till my ghastly tale is told,
This heart within me burns.

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pass, like night, from land to land; I have strange power of speech; That moment that his face I see, I know the man that must hear me: To him my tale I teach. What loud uproar bursts from that door! The wedding-guests are there : But in the garden-bower the bride And bride-maids singing are: And hark the little vesper-bell, Which biddeth me to prayer! O wedding-guest! this soul hath been Alone on a wide wide sea : So lonely 'twas, that God himself Scarce seemed there to be. O sweeter than the marriage-feast, 'Tis sweeter far to me, To walk together to the kirk With a goodly company! To walk together to the kirk, And all together pray, While each to his great Father bends, Old men, and babes, and loving friends, And youths and maidens gay! Farewell, farewell; but this I tell To thee, thou wedding-guest! He prayeth well, who loveth well Both man and bird and beast. He prayeth best, who loveth best All things both great and small; For the dear God who loveth us, He made and loveth all. The mariner, whose eye is bright, Whose beard with age is hoar, Is gone ; and now the wedding-guest Turned from the bridegroom's

door. He went like one that hath been stunn'd, And is of sense forlorn: A sadder and a wiser man, He rose the morrow morn.

Hannibal to his Soldiers.

LIVY. THE most elegant of Roman historians, born at Padua, and a chosen favourite among the wits of the court of Augustus. Few particulars of his life are known.

I know not, soldiers, whether you or your prisoners be encompassed by fortune with the stricter bonds and necessities. Two seas enclose

ou on the right and left; not a ship to flee to for escaping. Before you is the Po, a river broader and more rapid than the Rhone; behind you are the Alps, over which, even when your numbers were undiminished, you were hardly able to force a passage. Here, then, soldiers, you must either conquer or die, the very first hour you meet the enemy. But the same fortune which has thus laid you under the necessity of fighting, has set before your eyes those rewards of victory, than which no man was ever wont to wish for greater than the immortal gods. Should we by our valour recover only Sicily and Sardinia, which were ravished from our fathers, these would be no inconsiderable prizes. Yet what are these ! The wealth of Rome, whatever riches she has heaped together in the spoils of nations, all these, with the masters of them,

will be yours. You have been long enough employed in driving the cattle upon the vast mountains of Lusitania and Celtiberia ; you have hitherto met with no reward worthy of the labours and dangers you have undergone. The time is now come to reap the full recompense of your toilsome marches over so many mountains and rivers; and through so many nations, all of them in arms. This is the place which fortune has appointed to be the limits of your labours : it is here that you will finish your glorious warfare, and receive an ample recompense of your completed service. For I would not have you imagine that victory will be as difficult as the name of a Roman war is great and sounding. It has often happened, that a despised enemy has given a bloody battle, and the most renowned kings and nations have by a small force been overthrown. And if you but take away the glitter of the Roman name, what is there wherein they may stand in competition with you! For (to say nothing of your service in war for twenty years together with so much valour and success) from the very pillars of Hercules, from the ocean, from the utmost bounds of the earth, through so many warlike nations of Spain and Gaul, are you not come hither victorious ? And with whom are you now to fight? With raw soldiers, an undisciplined army, beaten, vanquished, besieged by the Gauls the very last summer, an army unknown to their leader, and unacquainted with him

Or, shall I, who was born I might almost say, but certainly brought up, in the tent of my father, that most excellent general; shall I, the conqueror of Spain and Gaul, and not only of the Alpine nations, but, which is greater yet, of the Alps themselves ; shall I compare myself with this half-year captain ? A captain before whom should one place the two armies without their en. signs, I am persuaded he would not know to which of them he iş consul ? I esteem it no small advantage, soldiers, that there is not one among you, who has not often been an eye-witness of my exploits in war; not one of whose valour I myself have not been a spectator, so as to be able to name the times and places of his noble achievements; that with soldiers, whom I have a thousand times praised and rewarded, and whose pupil I was before I became their general, I shall march against an army of men, strangers to one another.

On what side soever I turn my eyes, I behold all full of courage and strength; a veteran infantry; a most gallant cavalry: you, my allies, most faithful and valiant; you, Carthaginians, whom pot only your country's cause, but the justest anger impels to battle. The hope, the courage of assailants, is always greater than of those who act upon the defensive. With hostile banners displayed, you are come down upon Italy; you bring the war, Grief, injuries, indignities fire your minds, and spur you forward to revenge!-First they demanded me; that I, your general, should be delivered up to them; next, all of you who had fought at the siege of Saguntum ; and we were to be put to death by the extremest tortures. Proud and cruel nation! Everything must be yours and at your disposal! you are to prescribe to us with whom we shall make war, with whom we shall make peace! You are to set us bounds; to shut us up within hills and rivers : but you-you are not to observe the limits which yourselves have fixed. Pass not the Iberus. What next? Touch not the Saguntines. Saguntum is upon the Iberus, move not a step toward that city. Is it a small matter, then, that you have deprived us of our ancient possessions, Sicily and Sardinia ; you would have Spain too? Well, we shall yield Spain ! and then you will pass into Africa. Will pass, did I say? This very year they ordered one of their consuls into Africa, the other into Spain. No, soldiers, there is nothing left for us but what we can vindicate with our swords.

then. Be men. The Romans may with more safety be cowards; they have their own country behind them, have places of refuge to fee to, and are secure from danger in the roads thither; but for you there is no middle fortune between death and victory. Let this be but well fixed in your minds, and once again, I say, you are conquerors.

Come on,

On Happiness.

POPE.
O HAPPINESS! our being's end and aim !
Good, pleasure, ease, content! whate'er thy name;
That something still, which prompts the eternal sigh,
For which we bear to live, or dare to die;

Which still so near us, yet beyond us lies,
O’erlook'd, seen double, by the fool, and wise.
Plant of celestial seed! if dropp'd below,
Say, in what mortal soil thou deign'st to grow.
Fair op’ning to some court's propitious shine,
Or deep with diamonds in the flaming mine?
'Twined with the wreaths Parnassian laurels yield,
Or reap'd in iron harvests of the field ?

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it not? If vain our toil, We ought to blame the culture, not the soil: Fix'd to no spot is happiness sincere, 'Tis nowhere to be found, or everywhere; 'Tis never to be bought, but always free, And, fled from monarchs, St. John, dwells with thee.

Ask of the learn’d the way, the learn'd are blind : This bids to serve, and that to shun mankind: Some place the bliss in action, some in ease, Those call it pleasure, and contentment these : Some, sunk to beasts, find pleasure end in pain, Some, swell’d to gods, confess even virtue vain :

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