A Treasury of Humorous Poetry: Being a Compilation of Witty, Facetious, and Satirical Verse Selected from the Writings of British and American Poets

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Frederic Lawrence Knowles
D. Estes, 1902 - 407 psl.
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202 psl. - Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. 'Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch ! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch...
127 psl. - Nick, in shape o' beast; A towzie tyke, black, grim, and large, To gie them music was his charge: He screw'd the pipes and gart them skirl, Till roof and rafters a
129 psl. - Paisley harn, That while a lassie she had worn, In longitude tho' sorely scanty, It was her best, and she was vauntie. Ah ! little ken'd thy reverend grannie, That sark she coft for her wee Nannie, Wi...
19 psl. - Wakes on the morn of its hundredth year Without both feeling and looking queer. In fact, there's nothing that keeps its youth, So far as I know, but a tree and truth. (This is a moral that runs at large; Take it. You're welcome. No extra charge.) FIRST OF NOVEMBER, — the Earthquake-day. — There are traces of age in the one-hoss shay, A general flavor of mild decay, But nothing local as one may say.
289 psl. - A sect whose chief devotion lies In odd perverse antipathies ; In falling out with that or this, And finding somewhat still amiss ; More peevish, cross, and splenetic...
3 psl. - And I never larf, and I never smile, And I never lark nor play, But sit and croak, and a single joke I have — which is to say: "Oh, I am a cook and a captain bold, And the mate of the Nancy brig, And a bo'sun tight, and a midshipmite, And the crew of the captain's gig!
125 psl. - Shanter, As he frae Ayr ae night did canter, (Auld Ayr, wham ne'er a town surpasses, For honest men and bonnie lasses).
214 psl. - GOOD people all, of every sort, Give ear unto my song ; And if you find it wondrous short, It cannot hold you long. In Isling town there was a man Of whom the world might say That still a godly race he ran, Whene'er he went to pray. A kind and gentle heart he had, To comfort friends and foes: The naked every day he clad, When he put on his clothes. And in that town a dog was found, As many...
156 psl. - Gilpin's spouse said to her dear — " Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we no holiday have seen. " To-morrow is our wedding-day, and we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton all in a chaise and pair.
203 psl. - Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came! One, two ! One, two ! And through, and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. " And hast thou slain the Jabberwock ? Come to my arms, my beamish boy ! Oh, frabjous day! Callooh! callay!

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