A Compendious History of English Literature, and of the English Language, from the Norman Conquest

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Griffin, Bohn, 1861
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434 psl. - Forget not yet the tried intent Of such a truth as I have meant ; My great travail so gladly spent, Forget not yet ! Forget not yet when first began The weary life ye know, since whan The suit, the service none tell can ; Forget not yet ! Forget not yet the great assays, The cruel wrong...
556 psl. - The First part of the Contention betwixt the two famous Houses of Yorke and Lancaster...
419 psl. - Saxon at this day, yet it is not so Courtly nor so currant as our Southerne English is: no more is the far Westerne mans speach. Ye shall therefore take the vsuall speach of the Court, and that of London and the shires lying about London within Ix. myles, and not much aboue.
551 psl. - tis best To use myself in jest, Thus by feigned deaths to die. Yesternight the sun went hence, And yet is here today; He hath no desire nor sense, Nor half so short a way. Then fear not me, But believe that I shall make Speedier journeys, since I take More wings and spurs than he.
467 psl. - The Wounds of Civil War, lively set forth in the True Tragedies of Marius and Sylla.
505 psl. - And gazers' sense with double pleasure fed, Able to heal the sick, and to revive the dead. In her fair eyes two living lamps did flame, Kindled above at the heavenly Maker's light, And darted fiery beams out of the same, So passing persant and so wondrous bright That quite...
566 psl. - I have ever truly cherished my good opinion of other men's worthy labours, especially of that full and heightened style of Master Chapman ; the laboured and understanding works of Master Jonson ; the no less worthy composures of the both worthily excellent Master Beaumont and Master Fletcher ; and lastly (without wrong last to be named), the right happy and copious industry of Master Shakespeare, Master Dekker, and Master Heywood...
581 psl. - My lords, cannot I take my subjects money when I want it, without all this formality in parliament ? The bishop of Durham readily answered, God forbid, Sir, but you should ; you are the breath of our nostrils...
376 psl. - ... the truest lover, of a sinful man, that ever loved woman; and thou wert the kindest man that ever struck with sword. And thou wert the goodliest person that ever came among press of knights. And thou wert the meekest man, and the gentlest, that ever ate in hall among ladies. And thou wert the sternest knight to thy mortal foe that ever put spear in the rest.
433 psl. - GIVE place, ye lovers, here before That spent your boasts and brags in vain ; My Lady's beauty passeth more The best of yours, I dare well sayen, Than doth the sun the candle light, Or brightest day the darkest night. And thereto hath a troth as just As had Penelope the fair ; For what she saith, ye may it trust, As it by writing sealed were : And virtues hath she many mo' Than I with pen have skill to show.

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