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For the investigation and improvement of tobacco and the methods of tobacco production and handling, twenty-six thousand six hundred and thirty dollars;

For the investigation and improvement of forage crops and methods of forage-crop production, twenty thousand dollars;

For testing and breeding fibrous plants, including the testing of flax straw, in cooperation with the North Dakota Agricultural College, which may be used for paper making, twelve thousand five hundred and eighty dollars;

For the breeding and physiological study of alkali-resistant and drought-resistant crops, eighteen thousand one hundred and forty dollars;

For the investigation and improvement of sugar-producing plants, including their utilization and culture, thirty-five thousand seven hundred and ninety-five dollars;

For taxonomic investigations and the study of methods for the improvement of grazing lands, twenty-one thousand nine hundred and thirty-dollars;

To investigate and encourage the adoption of improved methods of farm management and farm practice, and for farm demonstration work, three hundred thousand dollars: Provided, That of the amount hereby appropriated the sum of ten thousand dollars may be used in the investigation and utilization of cacti and other dry-land plants as food for stock;

For farmers' cooperative demonstrations and for the study and demonstration of the best methods of meeting the ravages of the cotton-boll weevil, three hundred and thirty-two thousand nine hundred and sixty dollars;

For the investigation and improvement of methods of crop production under semiarid or dry-land conditions, one hundred and twentyfive thousand dollars: Provided, however, That the sum of fifty thousand dollars of this amount, or so much thereof as may be necessary, shall be used for the purchase of land and equipment and the construction of buildings necessary to establish, equip, and maintain an experimental farm in the northern section of the Great Plains area to demonstrate the kind and character of plants, shrubs, trees, berries, and vegetables best adapted to the climate and soil of the semiarid lands of the United States: Provided further, That the limitation in this Act as to the cost of farm buildings shall not apply to this paragraph;

For studying methods of clearing off"logged-off” lands with a view to their utilization for agricultural and dairying purposes; for their irrigation; for testing powders in clearing them; and for the utilization of by-products arising in the process of clearing, in cooperation with the States, companies, or individuals, or otherwise, five thousand dollars;

For investigations in connection with western irrigation agriculture, the utilization of lands reclaimed under the reclamation Act, and other areas in the arid and semiarid regions, sixty-nine thousand six hundred dollars;

For the investigation and improvement of fruits, and the methods of fruit growing, harvesting, packing, storing, handling, and shipping, and for experimental shipments of fruits within the United States and to foreign countries, eighty-six thousand and fifteen dollars;

To cultivate and care for experimental gardens and grounds, manage and maintain conservatories, greenhouses, and plant and fruit propagating houses, thirteen thousand and ten dollars;

For continuing the necessary improvements to establish and maintain a general experiment farm and agricultural station on the Arlington estate, in the State of Virginia, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of Congress approved April eighteenth, nineteen hundred, and for other general horticultural investigations, thirtysix thousand nine hundred and twenty dollars;

For general administrative expenses connected with the abovementioned lines of investigation, including the office of the chief of bureau, the assistant chief of bureau, the chief clerk, the officer in charge of publications, records, supplies, and property, and for miscellaneous expenses incident thereto, thirty-six thousand five hundred and thirty dollars;

In all, for general expenses, one million six hundred and fifty-eight thousand and eighty dollars.

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The portion of this act, here omitted, relating to the purchase, propagation, testing, and distribution of valuable seeds, etc., and plants, is set

forth on p. 75, ante. Total for Bureau of Plant Industry, two million three hundred and twenty-three thousand five hundred and eighty dollars.

Act August 10, 1912, c. 284, 37 Stat. 274. To enable the Secretary of Agriculture to meet the emergency caused by the continuous spread of the chestnut-bark disease by continuing the study of the nature and habits of the parasitic fungus causing the disease, for the purpose of discovering new methods of control, and by putting into application methods of control already discovered, eighty thousand dollars, of which sum thirty thousand dollars shall be immediately available, and the Secretary of Agriculture is hereby authorized to expend said appropriation in such manner as he shåll deem best, in cooperation with the authorities of the States concerned or with individuals, and to pay all necessary expenses for the employment of investigators, local and special agents, experts, assistants, and all labor and other necessary expenses, including rent, in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, as may be required: Provided, That of this sum not exceeding ten thousand dollars shall be used in the study of the relation of insects to the chestnut-bark disease.

To enable the Secretary of Agriculture to investigate the cultivation, acclimating and development of the most nutritious and productive types of potatoes, and for the purpose of experimentation and development of American sugar-beet seed adapted to the irrigated lands of the arid West, ten thousand dollars.

Act August 10, 1912, c. 284, 37°Stat. 301.

These are further provisions of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above. The last two paragraphs are contained under the heading “ Miscellaneous."

FOREST SERVICE.

ACT MARCH 2, 1901, c. 805. (31 Stat. 922.)
Chief of bureau.

One forester, who shall be chief of bureau,
Act. March 2, 1901, c. 805, 31 Stat. 929.

This is a provision of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1902, cited above. Provisions in the same words are contained in the similar acts for subsequent fiscal years. The provision in the act for the fiscal year 1913 is set forth on p. 173, post. Previous to the reorganization of the Division of Forestry into the Bureau of Forestry, by a provision of act June 3, 1902, c. 955, set forth on p. 11, ante, the agricultural appropriation acts, for the fiscal years 1895 to 1901, inclusive, contained provisions for One forester, who shall be chief of division."

ACT JUNE 3, 1902, c. 985. (32 Stat. 286.)
Establishment of Bureau of Forestry.

All existing statutes relating to the Division of Forestry, reorganized into the Bureau of Forestry, not otherwise repealed, are continued in effect as applying to the bureau into which the division is reorganized, by a proviso annexed to the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1903, cited above, set forth on p. 11, ante.

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ACT FEBRUARY 1, 1905, c. 288. An act providing for the transfer of forest

reserves from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Agri

culture. (33 Stat. 628.) Secretary of Agriculture to execute laws affecting forest reserves; exceptions.

That the Secretary of the Department of Agriculture shall, from and after the passage of this Act, execute or cause to be executed all laws affecting public lands heretofore or hereafter reserved under the provisions of section twenty-four of the Act entitled “An Act to repeal the timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and Acts supplemental to and amendatory thereof, after such lands have been so reserved, excepting such laws as affect the surveying, prospecting, locating, appropriating, entering, relinquishing, reconveying, certifying, or patenting of any of such lands.

Act February 1, 1905, c. 288, s. 1, 33 Stat. 628.

Act March 3, 1891, C. 561, s. 24, mentioned in this section, is set forth

below. ACT MARCH 3, 1899, c. 424. (30 Stat. 1074.) Establishment of boundaries of forest reservations.

That hereafter all standard, meander, township, and section lines of the public land surveys shall, as heretofore, be established under the direction and supervision of the Commissioner of the General Land Office, whether the lands to be surveyed are within or without reservations, except that where the exterior boundaries of public forest reservations are required to be coincident with standard, township, or section lines such boundaries may, if not previously established in the ordinary course of the public land surveys, be established and marked under the supervision of the Director of the United States Geological Survey whenever necessary to complete the survey of such exterior boundaries.

Act March 3, 1899, c. 124, 30 Stat. 1097.

This is a proviso annexed to the sundry civil appropriation act for the fiscal year 1900, cited above.

ACT MARCH 3, 1891, c. 561. (26 Stat. 1095.)
Establishment of forest reservations.

Sec. 24. That the President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests, in any part of the public lands wholly or in part covered with timber or undergrowth, whether of commercial value or not, as public reservations, and the President shall, by public proclamation, declare the establishment of such reservations and the limits thereof.

Act March 3, 1891, c. 561, s. 24, 26 Stat. 1103.

This section is a portion of "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes,” cited above.

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ACT MARCH 4, 1907, c. 2907. (34 Stat. 1256.) Forest reserves to be known as national forests. forest reserves

shall be known hereafter as national forests

Act March 4, 1907, c. 2907, 34 Stat. 1269.

This is a provision of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1908, cited above.

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ACT JUNE 4, 1897, c. 2. (30 Stat. 11.)
Revocation, modification, or suspension of Executive orders establishing forest

reservations; orders setting aside lands in certain States, suspended. * * * That, to remove any doubt which may exist pertaining to the authority of the President thereunto [public lands that may have been or may hereafter be designated as forest reserves by Executive proclamation, under section twenty-four of the Act of Congress approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled “An Act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes,"], the President of the United States is hereby authorized and empowered to revoke, modify, or suspend any and all such Executive orders and proclamations, or any part thereof, from time to time as he shall deem best for the public interests: Provided, That the Executive orders and proclamations dated February twenty-second, eighteen hundred and ninety-seven, setting apart and reserving certain lands in the States of Wyoming, Utah, Montana, Washington, Idaho, and South Dakota as forest reservations, be, and they are hereby, suspended, and the lands embraced therein restored to the public domain the same as though said orders and proclamations had not been issued: Provided further, That lands embraced in said reservations not otherwise disposed of before March first, eighteen hundred and ninety-eight, shall again become subject to the operations of said orders and proclamations as now existing or hereafter modified by the President.

Act June 4, 1897, c. 2, s. 1, 30 Stat. 34.

These are provisos of the sundry civil appropriation act for the fiscal year 1898, cited above,

The provisions of act March 3, 1891, c. 561, s. 24, referred to in this paragraph, are set forth above.

By a provision of act March 4, 1907, c. 2907, set forth on p. 91, post, no forest reserve shall be created nor additions made to existing forest reserves, within the States of Oregon, Wyoming, Idaho, Montana, Colorado, or Wyoming, except by act of Congress.

Purposes for which forest reserves may be administered and established.

All public lands heretofore designated and reserved by the President of the United States under the provisions of the Act approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, the orders for which shall be and remain in full force and effect, unsuspended and unrevoked, and all public lands that may hereafter be set aside and reserved as public forest reserves under said Act, shall be as far as practicable controlled and administered in accordance with the following provisions:

No public forest reservation shall be established, except to improve and protect the forest within the reservation, or for the purpose of securing favorable conditions of water flows, and to furnish a continuous supply of timber for the use and necessities of citizens of the United States; but it is not the purpose or intent of these provisions, or of the Act providing for such reservations, to authorize the inclusion therein of lands more valuable for the mineral therein, or for agricultural purposes, than for forest purposes. Protection of forest reserves; rules and regulations therefor.

The Secretary of the Interior shall make provisions for the protection against destruction by fire and depredations upon the public forests and forest reservations which may have been set aside or which may be hereafter set aside under the said Act of March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, and which may be continued; and he may make such rules and regulations and establish such service as will insure the objects of such reservations, namely, to regulate their occupancy and use and to preserve the forests thereon from destruction; and any violation of the provisions of this Act or such rules and regulations shall be punished as is provided for in the Act of June fourth, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, amending section fifty; three hundred and eighty-eight of the Revised Statutes of the United States.

Act June 4, 1897, c. 2, s. 1, 30 Stat. 34.

These are further provisions of the sundry civil appropriation act for the fiscal year 1898, cited above.

The provisions of act March 3, 1891, c. 561, s. 24, referred to above, are set forth above.

The provisions of Rev. St. sec. 5388, as amended by act June 4, 1888, c. 340, 25 Stat. 166, mentioned above, are incorporated in “An act to codify, revise, and amend the penal laws of the United States," act March 4, 1909, c. 321, s. 50, set forth on p. 105, post. Said Rev. St. sec. 5388 and said act June 4, 1888, are expressly repealed by section 341 of said act March 1909.

The Secretary of Agriculture shall execute all laws affecting public lands reserved under the provisions of act March 3, 1891, c. 561, s. 24, except such laws as affect the surveying, prospecting, locating, entering, etc., and patenting of such lands, by the provisions of "An act providing for the transfer of forest reserves from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Agriculture," act February 1, 1905, c. 288, s. 1, set

forth on p. 86, ante. Sale of timber on forest reservations.

For the purpose of preserving the living and growing timber and promoting the younger growth on forest reservations, the Secretary of the Interior, under such rules and regulations as he shall prescribe, may cause to be designated and appraised so much of the dead, matured, or large growth of trees found upon such forest reserva

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