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thereof, for each offense, be fined in a sum not exceeding five hundred dollars, or be imprisoned not to exceed ninety days, or be both fined and imprisoned, in the discretion of the court.

Act March 3, 1905, C. 1405, 33 Stat. 864.

This is a provision enacted in the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1906. See act March 4, 1909, c. 321, s. 61, set forth above, and notes thereunder.

ACT AUGUST 10, 1912, c. 284. (37 Stat. 269.)

SALARIES, WEATHER BUREAU : One chief of bureau, six thousand dollars; one assistant chief of bureau, three thousand' two hundred and fifty dollars; one chief clerk and executive assistant, three thousand dollars; three chiefs of division, at two thousand dollars each; eight clerks, class four; nine clerks, class three; twenty clerks, class two; twenty-nine clerks, class one; twenty clerks, at one thousand dollars each; nine clerks, at nine hundred dollars each; four copyists or typewriters, at nine hundred dollars each; one copyist or typewriter, eight hundred and forty dollars; one telegraph operator, one thousand two hundred dollars; two assistant foremen of division, at one thousand six hundred dollars each; one lithographer, one thousand five hundred dollars; three lithographers, at one thousand two hundred dollars each; five compositors, at one thousand two hundred and fifty dollars each; fourteen printers, at one thousand two hundred dollars each; eleven printers, at one thousand dollars each; four folders and feeders, at seven hundred and twenty dollars each; one chief mechanic, one thousand four hundred dollars; five skilled mechanics, at one thousand two hundred dollars each; seven skilled mechanics, at one thousand dollars each; one skilled mechanic, eight hundred and forty dollars; six skilled artisans, at eight hundred and forty dollars each; one engineer, one thousand three hundred dollars; one fireman and steam fitter, eight hundred and forty dollars; six firemen, at seven hundred and twenty dollars each; one captain of the watch, one thousand dollars; one electrician, one thousand dollars; one gardener, eight hundred and forty dollars; two repairmen, at eight hundred and forty dollars each; eight repairmen, at seven hundred and twenty dollars each; four watchmen, at seven hundred and twenty dollars each; seventeen messengers, messenger boys, or laborers, at seven hundred and twenty dollars each; six messengers, messenger boys, or laborers, at six hundred and sixty dollars each; twenty-seven messengers, messenger boys, or laborers, at six hundred dollars each: eighty-seven messengers, messenger boys, or laborers, at four hundred and eighty dollars each; five messengers, messenger boys, or laborers, at four hundred and fifty dollars each; twenty-seven messenger boys, at three hundred and sixty dollars each; one charwoman, three hundred and sixty dollars; three charwomen, at two hundred and forty dollars each ; in all, three hundred and fifteen thousand nine hundred and thirty dollars.

CONTINGENT EXPENSES, WEATHER BUREAU : For fuel, lights, repairs, and other expenses for the care and preservation of the public build ings and grounds and the improvements of the existing public buildings of the Weather Bureau in the city of Washington; for stationery and blank books, furniture and repåirs to same, and freight and express charges; for subsistence, care, and purchase of horses and vehicles, and repairs of harness, for official purposes only; for advertising, dry goods, twine, mats, oils, paints, glass, lumber, hardware,

ice, washing towels, and other' miscellaneous supplies and expenses not otherwise provided for in the city of Washington, twenty-five thousand dollars.

GENERAL EXPENSES, WEATHER Bureau: For carrying into effect in the District of Columbia and elsewhere in the United States, in the West Indies or on adjacent coasts, in the Hawaiian Islands, and in Bermuda, the provisions of an Act approved October first, eighteen hundred and ninety, so far as they relate to the weather service transferred thereby to the Department of Agriculture, and for every expenditure requisite for and incident to the establishment, equipment, and maintenance of meteorological observation stations, including cooperation with other bureaus of the Government and societies and institutions of learning for the dissemination of meteorological information, as follows:

For the employment of professors of meteorology, inspectors, district forecasters, local forecasters, section directors, research observers, observers, assistant observers, operators, skilled mechanics, repairmen, station agents, messengers, messenger boys, laborers, and other necessary employees, five hundred and sixty-nine thousand dollars;

For fuel, gas, electricity, freight and express charges, furniture, stationery, and all other necessary supplies and miscellaneous expenses, one hundred and five thousand five hundred dollars;

For instruments, shelters, apparatus, storm-warning towers, and repairs thereto, forty-two thousand five hundred dollars;

For rent of offices and repairs and improvements to buildings now completed and located outside of the District of Columbia, and care and preservation of grounds, including construction of necessary outbuildings and sidewalks on public streets abutting Weather Bureau grounds, ninety-nine thousand dollars;

For official traveling expenses, twenty-two thousand dollars;

For telephone rentals and for telegraphing, telephoning, and cabling reports and messages, rates to be fixed by the Secretary of Agriculture by agreements with the companies performing the service, three hundred and five thousand dollars;

For the maintenance and repair of Weather Bureau telegraph, telephone, and cable lines, four thousand dollars;

For investigations in climatology and evaporation, including the erection of temporary buildings for living quarters for observers, for river, rain, snow, ice, crop, evaporation, aerial, storm, hurricane, and other observations, warnings, and reports, and for pay of special observers and display men, one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars;

For the maintenance of a printing office in the city of Washington, including the purchase of necessary supplies and materials for printing weather maps, bulletins, circulars, forms, and other publications, and for pay of additional assistant foremen, proof readers, compositors, pressmen, lithographers, and folders and feeders, when necessary, sixteen thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars;

In all, for general expenses, one million two hundred and seventyeight thousand seven hundred and fifty dollars.

Total for Weather Bureau, one million six hundred and nineteen thousand six hundred and eighty dollars.

Act August 10, 1912, c. 284, 37 Stat. 270.

These are provisions of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above.

LAWS APPLICABLE TO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE.

41

BUREAU OF ANIMAL INDUSTRY..

ACT MAY 29, 1884, c. 60. An act for the establishment of a Bureau of Animal

Industry, to prevent the exportation of diseased cattle, and to provide means for the suppression and extirpation of pleuro-pneumonia and other con

tagious diseases among domestic animals. (23 Stat. 31.) Establishment of the Bureau.

That the Commissioner of Agriculture shall organize in his Department a Bureau of Animal Industry, and shall appoint a Chief thereof, who shall be a competent veterinary surgeon, and whose duty it shall be to investigate and report upon the condition of the domestic animals of the United States, their protection and use, and also inquire into and report the causes of contagious, infectious, and communicable diseases among them, and the means for the prevention and cure of the same, and to collect such information on these subjects as shall be valuable to the agricultural and commercial interests of the country; and the Commissioner of Agriculture is hereby authorized to employ a force sufficient for this purpose, not to exceed twenty persons at any one time. The salary of the Chief of said Bureau shaîl be three thousand dollars per annum; and the Commissioner shall appoint a clerk for said Bureau, with a salary of one thousand five hundred dollars per annum.

Act May 29, 1884, c. 60, s. 1, 23 Stat. 31.

The designation of the Commissioner of Agriculture is changed by the organization of the department as an executive department under a Secretary of Agriculture, by act February 9, 1889, c. 122, s. 1, set forth on p. 9. ante. The authority granted to the Commissioner of Agriculture by this act is vested in the Secretary of Agriculture by act July 14, 1890, c. 707, set forth on p. 11, ante.

The last portion of this section providing for the salary of the Chief of the Bureau and the appointment and salary of a clerk, is superseded by subsequent agricultural appropriation acts providing for increased salary for the Chief of the Bureau and for other officers, clerks, and employees and their salaries, from time to time, increasing with the growth and the extension of the scope and functions of the bureau. The appropriations for the salary of the Chief of the Bureau and other officers, clerks, and employees of the bureau, in the appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, are set forth on p. 71, post.

Agents; duties.

SEC. 2. That the Commissioner of Agriculture is authorized to appoint two competent agents, who shall be practical stock-raisers or experienced business men familiar with questions pertaining to coinmercial transactions in live stock, whose duty it shall be, under the instructions of the Commissioner of Agriculture, to examine and report upon the best methods of treating, transporting, and caring for animals, and the means to be adopted for the suppression and extirpation of contagious pleuro-pneumonia, and to provide against the spread of other dangerous contagious, infectious, and communicable diseases. The compensation of said agents shall be at the rate of ten dollars per diem, with all necessary expenses, while engaged in the actual performance of their duties under this act, when absent from their usual place of business or residence as such agent.

Act May 29, 1884, c. 60, s. 2, 23 Stat. 31.

See note under section 1 of this act as to change of designation of Commissioner to Secretary of Agriculture.

The provisions of this section for the appointment and compensation of two agents are superseded by appropriations of subsequent agricultural appropriation acts. The provisions of the act for the fiscal year 1913, are set forth on p. 71, post.

Rules and regulations for suppression and extirpation of diseases; coopera

tion of States and Territories. Sec. 3. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Agriculture to prepare such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary for the speedy and effectual suppression and extirpation of said diseases, and to certify such rules and regulations to the executive authority of each State and Territory, and invite said authorities to co-operate in the execution and enforcement of this act. Whenever the plans and methods of the Commissioner of Agriculture shall be accepted by any State or Territory in which pleuro-pneumonia or other contagious, infectious, or communicable disease is declared to exist, or such State or Territory shall have adopted plans and methods for the suppression and extirpation of said diseases, and such plans and methods shall be accepted by the Commissioner of Agriculture, and whenever the governor of a State or other properly constituted authorities signify their readiness to co-operate for the extinction of any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease in conformity with the provisions of this act, the Commissioner of Agriculture is hereby authorized to expend so much of the money appropriated by this act as may be necessary in such investigations, and in such disinfection and quarantine measures as may be necessary to prevent the spread of the disease from one State or Territory into another.

Act May 29, 1884, c. 60, s. 3, 23 Stat. 32.

See note under section 1 of this act as to change of designation of

Commissioner to Secretary of Agriculture. Investigation as to pleuro-pneumonia and other contagious, etc., diseases; regu

lations. Sec. 4. That in order to promote the exportation of live stock from the United States the Commissioner of Agriculture shall make special investigation as to the existence of pleuro-pneumonia, or any con. tagious, infectious, or communicable disease, along the dividing-lines between the United States and foreign countries, and along the lines of transportation from all parts of the United States to ports from which live stock are exported, and make report of the results of such investigation to the Secretary of the Treasury, who shall, from time to time, establish such regulations concerning the exportation and transportation of live stock as the results of said investigations may require.

Act May 29, 1884, c. 60, S. 4, 23 Stat. 32.

See note under section 1 of this act as to change of designation of Com. missioner to Secretary of Agriculture.

The powers conferred on the Secretary of the Treasury by this and the following section are conferred on the Secretary of Agriculture, to be exercised exclusively by him, by provisions of act February 2, 1903, c. 349, s. 1, set forth below.

Inspection of neat cattle, sheep, and other ruminants, and swine, for exportation, and disinfection of vessels, etc., is authorized by act August 30, 1890, c. 839, 8. 10, set forth on p. 50, post; inspection and certification of cattle for exportation is authorized by act March 3, 1891, c. 555, s. 1, set forth on p. 55, post; and provisions for rules and regulations concerning the exportation of live stock, and for the inspection and certification of live stock for exportation, are contained in act February 2, 1903, c. 349, s. 1, set forth below.

Measures to prevent exportation of diseased live stock, authorized.

Sec. 5. That to prevent the exportation from any port of the United States to any port in a foreign country of live stock affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially pleuro-pneumonia, the Secretary of the Treasury be, and he is hereby, authorized to take such steps and adopt such measures, not inconsistent with the provisions of this act, as he may deem necessary.

Act May 29, 1984, c. 60, s. 5, 23 Stat. 32.

See notes under section 4 of this act. Transportation of diseased live stock prohibited; splenetic fever not consid

ered contagious, etc. Sec. 6. That no railroad company within the United States, or the owners or masters of any steam or sailing or other vessel or boat, shall receive for transportation or transport, from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from the District into any State, any live stock affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuro-pneumonia ; nor shall any person, company, or corporation deliver for such transportation to any railroad company, or master or owner of any boat or vessel, any live stock, knowing them to be affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease; nor shall any person, company, or corporation drive on foot or transport in private conveyance from one State or Territory to another, or from any State into the District of Columbia, or from the District into any State, any live stock, knowing them to be affected with any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease, and especially the disease known as pleuro-pneumonia: Provided, That the socalled splenetic or Texas fever shall not be considered a contagious, infectious, or communicable disease within the meaning of sections four, five, six and seven of this act, as to cattle being transported by rail to market for slaughter, when the same are unloaded only to be fed and watered in lots on the way thereto.

Act May 29, 1884, c. 60, s. 6, 23 Stat. 32.

Provisions for rules and regulations concerning the exportation of live stock, and for the inspection and certification of live stock for exportation, are contained in act February 2, 1903, c. 349, s. 1, set forth below.

Provisions for the establishment of quarantine of any State or Territory or the District of Columbia, or any portion of any of them, when cattle or other live stock therein are affected with any contagious, etc., disease, and the making and promulgation of regulations in regard thereto, and prohibiting the interstate movement of cattle or other live stock from such quarantined areas except under such regulations, are contained

in act March 3, 1905, c. 1496, set forth below. Notice to railroads, etc., in infected localities; transportation of diseased live

stock; penalty. Sec. 7. That it shall be the duty of the Commissioner of Agriculture to notify, in writing, the proper officials or agents of any railroad, steamboat, or other transportation company doing business in or through any infected locality, and by publication in such newspapers as he may select, of the existence of said contagion; and any person or persons operating any such railroad, or master or owner of any boat or vessel, or owner or custodian of or person having control over such cattle or other live stock within such infected district, who shall knowingly violate the provisions of section six of this act, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction, shall

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