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registry fee on his private letter, packet, package, or other matter in the mail, shall be fined not more than three hundred dollars.

Act March 4, 1909, c. 321, s. 227, 35 Stat. 1134.

This is a section of "An act to codify, revise, and amend the penal laws of the United States,” cited above, incorporating therein provisions of act March 3, 1877, c. 103, s. 5. which provisions are expressly repealed by section 341 of this act.

ACT JULY 5, 1884, c. 234. (23 Stat. 156.)
Letters, packages, etc., transmitted free; endorsements on official envelopes,

enclosure of penalty envelopes, with return address; official mail matter registered free. Sec. 3. That section twenty-nine of the act of March third, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine (United States Statutes at Large, page three hundred and sixty-two), be, and it is hereby, amended so as to read as follows:

“ The provisions of the fifth and sixth section of the act entitled 'An act establishing post-routes, and for other purposes' approved March third, eighteen hundred and seventy-seven, for the transmission of official mail-matter, be, and they are hereby, extended to all officers of the United States Government, not including members of Congress, the envelopes of such matter in all cases to bear appropriate indorsements containing the proper designation of the office from which or officer from whom the same is transmitted, with a statement of the penalty for their misuse. * Provided, That any Department or officer authorized to use the penalty envelopes may inclose them with return address to any person or persons from or through whom official information is desired, the same to be used only to cover such official information, and indorsements relating thereto: Provided further, That any letter or packet to be registered by either of the Executive Departments, or Bureaus thereof, or by the Agricultural Department,

may be registered without the payment of any registry fee; and any part-paid letter or packet addressed to either of said Departments or Bureaus may be delivered free; but where there is good reason to believe the omission to prepay the full postage thereon was intentional, such letter or package shall be returned to the sender: Provided further, That this act shall not extend or apply to

officers who receive a fixed allowance as compensation for their services, including expenses of postages. And section thirty-nine hundred and fifteen of the Revised Statutes of the United States, so far as the same relates to stamps and stamped envelopes for official purposes, is hereby repealed.”

Act July 5, 1884, c. 234, s. 3, 23 Stat. 158.

Act March 3, 1877, c. 103, ss. 5, 6, mentioned in this section, are set forth above.

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Contract for official envelopes for departments, by Postmaster General; business

address, etc., thereon forbidden. SEC. 96. The Postmaster-General shall contract for all envelopes, stamped or otherwise, designed for sale to the public, or for use by his own or other Departments, and may contract for them to be plain or with such printed matter as may be prescribed by the Department making requisition therefor: Provided, That no envelope furnished by the Government shall contain any business address or advertisement.

Act January 12, 1895, c. 23, s. 96, 28 Stat. 624.

ACT JUNE 26, 1906, c. 3546. (34 Stat. 467.)
Contracts for official envelopes for departments, by Postmaster General.

The Postmaster-General is authorized to extend for a period not exceeding six months, the contract for official, registry, and deadletter envelopes for the postal service for the calendar year ending December thirty-first, nineteen hundred and six; and thereafter the Postmaster-General shall contract, for a period not exceeding four years, for all envelopes, stamped or otherwise, designed

* for use by the

Executive Departments, and all Government bureaus and establishments, and the branches of the service coming under their jurisdiction, and may contract for them to be plain or with such printed matter as may be prescribed by the Department making requisition therefor:

* Act June 26, 1906, C. 3546, 34 Stat. 476.

This is a provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1907, cited above.

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ACT MARCH 3, 1883, c. 128. (22 Stat. 531.)
Penalty envelopes for answers to be inclosed in official communications to

Members of Congress.
Sec. 2.

And it shall be the duty of the respective departments to inclose to Senators, Representatives and Delegates in Congress, in all official communications requiring answers, or to be forwarded to others, penalty envelopes addressed as far as practicable, for forwarding or answering such official correspondence.

Act March 3, 1883, c. 128, s. 2, 22 Stat. 563.

This is a provision of the legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation act for the fiscal year 1884, cited above.

The portion of this section omitted here, authorizing the heads of departments to make requisitions on the Postmaster General for official postage stamps, is superseded by act July 5, 1884, c. 234, s. 3, set forth above, amending act March 3, 1879, c. 180, s. 29.

ACT MARCH 1, 1899, c. 327. (30 Stat. 959.)
Franking privilege extended to Hawaiian Islands.

The franking privilege, as the same is regulated by law, shall extend to the Hawaiian Islands.

Act March 1, 1899, c. 327, s. 4, 30 Stat. 966.

This is a provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1900, cited above.

ACT JUNE 26, 1906, c. 3546. (34 Stat. 467.)
Matter admitted to mails under penalty privilege restricted to matter admis-

sible on payment of postage. That hereafter no article, package, or other matter, except postage stamps, stamped envelopes, newspaper wrappers, postal cards, and internal-revenue stamps, shall be admitted to the mails under a penalty privilege, unless such article, package, or other matter, except postage stamps, stamped envelopes, newspaper wrappers, postal cards,

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and internal-revenue stamps would be entitled to admission to the mails under laws requiring payment of postage.

Act June 26, 1906, c. 3546, 34 Stat. 477.

This is a provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal

year 1907, cited above. Lending or permitting use of frank by or for any committee, organization or

association, unlawful. That hereafter it shall be unlawful for any person entitled under the law to the use of a frank to lend said frank or permit its use by any committee, organization, or association, or permit its use by any person for the benefit or use of any committee, organization, or association:

Act June 26, 1906, c. 3546, 34 Stat. 477.

This is a further provision of the postal service appropriation act for

the fiscal year 1907, cited above. ACT JUNE 8, 1896, c. 370. An act to regulate mail matter of the fourth class.

(29 Stat. 262.) Nonmailable matter; limit on weight.

That mailable matter of the fourth class shall embrace all matter not embraced in the first, second, or third class which is not in its form or nature liable to destroy, deface, or otherwise damage the contents of the mail bag or harm the person of anyone engaged in the postal service, and is not above the weight provided by law, which is hereby declared to be not exceeding four pounds for each package thereof, except in case of single books weighing in excess of that amount, and except for books and documents published or circulated by order of Congress, or printed or written official matter emanating from any of the Departments of the Government

Act June 8, 1896, c. 370, 29 Stat. 262.

This provision is superseded by act August 24, 1912, c. 389, s. 8, set

forth below. ACT AUGUST 24, 1912, c. 389. (37 Stat. 539.) Limit on weight and size; nonmailable matter.

Sec. 8. That hereafter fourth-class mail matter shall embrace all other matter, including farm and factory products, not now embraced by law in either the first, second, or third class, not exceeding eleven pounds in weight, nor greater in size than seventy-two inches in length and girth combined, nor in form or kind likely to injure the person of any postal employee or damage the mail equipment or other mail matter and not of a character perishable within a period reasonably required for transportation and delivery.

Act August 24, 1912, c. 389, s. 8, 37 Stat. 557.

This section is a part of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above.

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TELEGRAPHS.

ACT FEBRUARY 4, 1874, c. 22. An act in relation to the lines of telegraph

connecting the Capitol with the various Departments of the Government.

(18 Stat. 14.) Telegraph lines connecting public buildings in Washington; supervision; opera

tion. That the lines of telegraph, connecting the Capitol with the various Departments in Washington, constructed under and by virtue of the act of Congress approved March third, eighteen hundred and seventythree, entitled "An act making appropriations for sundry civil expenses of the Government for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-four, and for other purposes," be, and the same are hereby, placed under the supervision of the officer in charge of the public buildings and grounds; and that the said officer be authorized and empowered to make rules and regulations for the working of said lines. And the Secretary or the Head of each Executive Department, and the Congressional Printer, are hereby authorized to detail one person from their present force of employees to operate the instruments in said Departments and printing office,

Act February 4, 1874, c. 22, 18 Stat. 14.

Act March 3, 1873, c. 227, 17 Stat. 519, mentioned in this act, makes an appropriation “for connecting the capitol by telegraph, to be used solely for public business, with all the departments of the government and the government printing office in the city of Washington."

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ACT MARCH 7, 1874, c. 50. (18 Stat. 20.) Use of telegraph lines connecting public buildings in Washington restricted to public business.

That said lines of telegraph shall be for the use only of Senators, Members of Congress, Judges of the United States courts and officers of Congress and of the Executive Departments, and solely on public business.

Act March 7, 1874, c. 50, 18 Stat. 20.

The telegraph lines referred to are those mentioned in act February 4, 1874, c. 22, and note thereunder set forth above.

REV. ST. SEC. 5266.
Government to have priority in transmission of messages over telegraph lines

on public domain. Sec. 5266. Telegrams between the several Departments of the Government and their officers and agents, in their transmission over the lines of any telegraph company to which has been given the right of way, timber, or station lands from the public domain shall have priority over all other business, at such rates as the Postmaster-General shall annually fix. And no part of any appropriation for the several Departments of the Government shall be paid to any company which neglects or refuses to transmit such telegrams in accordance with the provisions of this section.

REV. ST. SEC. 5269.
Refusal to transmit Government telegraphic communications; penalty.

Sec. 5269. Whenever any telegraph company, after having filed its written acceptance with the Postmaster-General of the restrictions and obligations required by the act approved July twenty-fourth. eighteen hundred and sixty-six, entitled "An act to aid in the con struction of telegraph lines, and to secure to the Government the use of the same for postal, military, and other purposes," or by this Title, shall, by its agents or employés, refuse or neglect to transmit any such telegraphic communications as are provided for by the aforesaid act,

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or by this Title, or by the provisions of section two hundred and twenty-one, Title “ THE DEPARTMENT OF WAR,” authorizing the Secretary of War to provide for taking meteorological observations at the military stations and other points of the interior of the continent, and for giving notice on the northern lakes and sea-board of the approach and force of storms, such telegraph company shall be liable to a penalty of not less than one hundred dollars and not more than one thousand dollars for each such refusal or neglect. To be recovered by an action or actions at law in any district court of the United States.

Rev. St. sec. 5269, as amended by act February 27, 1877, c. 69, 19 Stat. 252.

The provisions of act July 24, 1866, c. 230, referred to in this section are incorporated in Rev. St. secs. 5263-5268. Rev. St. secs. 5263–5265, 5267, 5268, are set forth on pp. 144, 145, ante, under “ Forest Service."

The filing by telegraph companies of their written acceptance of the restrictions and obligations under the law, is required by Rev. St. sec. 5268.

Rev. St. sec. 221, mentioned in this section, is set forth on p. 35, ante, under Weather Bureau."

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ACT MARCH 3, 1883, c. 143. (22 Stat. 603.)
Receipts from private telegrams transmitted over Government lines.

That on and after the first day of July, eighteen hundred and eighty-three, all moneys received for the transmission of private dispatches over any and all telegraph lines owned or operated by the United States, shall be paid into the Treasury of the United States, as required by section thirty-six hundred and seventeen of the Revised Statutes; and all acts or parts of acts inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed.

Act March 3, 1883, c. 143, 22 Stat. 616.

This is a proviso annexed to an appropriation for maintenance and repair of telegraph lines, in the sundry civil appropriation act for the fiscal year 1884, cited above.

Rev. St. sec. 3617, mentioned in this provision, is set forth on p. 334, ante, under Public Moneys and Accounting.”

ACT MARCH 4, 1909, c. 321. (35 Stat. 1088.)
Injury to United States telegraph, etc., lines; punishment.

Sec. 60. Whoever shall willfully or maliciously injure or destroy any of the works, property, or material of any telegraph, telephone, or cable line, or system, operated or controlled by the United States, whether constructed or in process of construction, or shall willfully or maliciously interfere in any way with the working or use of any such line, or system, or shall willfully or maliciously obstruct, hinder, or delay the transmission of any communication over any such line, or system, shall be fined not more than one thousand dollars, or imprisoned not more than three years, or both.

Act March 4, 1909, c. 321, s. 60, 35 Stat. 1099.

This is a section of "An act to codify, revise, and amend the penal laws of the United States," cited above, incorporating therein the provisions of act June 23, 1874, c. 461, which act is expressly repealed by section 341 of this act.

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