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Treasury may deliver to the consignee such goods pending examination and decision in the matter on execution of a penal bond for the amount of the full invoice value of such goods, together with the duty thereon, and on refusal to return such goods for any cause to the custody of the Secretary of the Treasury, when demanded, for the purpose of excluding them from the country, or for any other purpose, said consignee shall forfeit the full amount of the bond: And provided further, That all charges for storage, cartage, and labor on goods which are refused admission or delivery shall be paid by the owner or consignee, and in default of such payment shall constitute a lien against any future importation made by such owner or consignee.

Act June 30, 1906, c. 3915, s. 11, 34 Stat, 772.

Previous provisions somewhat similar to those of this section accompanied appropriations for the Bureau of Chemistry in the annual agri. cultural appropriation acts for the fiscal year 1907 and previous fiscal years, but are omitted from the acts for subsequent years.

The provisions of the act for the fiscal year 1907, act June 30, 1906, c. 3913, are

set forth on p. 185, ante. Term “Territory” in act to include insular possessions; construction of word

“person" in act; liability of corporations, etc., for acts, omissions, etc., of officers, agents, employees, etc. SEC. 12. That the term “ Territory" as used in this Act shall include the insular possessions of the United States. The word “person as used in this Act shall be construed to import both the plural and the singular, as the case demands, and shall include corporations, companies, societies and associations. When construing and enforcing the provisions of this Act, the act, omission, or failure of any officer, agent, or other person acting for or employed by any corporation, company, society, or association, within the scope of his employment or office, shall in every case be also deemed to be the act, omission, or failure of such corporation, company, society, or association as well as that of the person.

Act June 30, 1906, c. 3915, s. 12, 34 Stat. 772. Time of taking effect of act.

Sec. 13. That this Act shall be in force and effect from and after the first day of January, nineteen hundred and seven.

Act June 30, 1906, c. 3915, s. 13, 34 Stat. 772.

Annual appropriations for all expenses necessary to carry into effect the provisions of this act are made in the agricultural appropriation acts for the fiscal year 1908 and thereafter. The provision of the act for the fiscal year 1913 is set forth on p. 196, post.

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ACT MAY 23, 1908, c. 192. (35 Stat. 251.)
Report to Congress of payments to State, county, or municipal officers, etc.

That hereafter any sum used for compensation of or payment of expenses to any officer or other person employed by any State, county, or municipal government, shall be reported to Congress in detail, on the first Monday of December of each year.

Act May 23, 1908, c. 192, 35 Stat. 261.

This is a proviso annexed to appropriations for "General expenses, Bureau of Chemistry,” in the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1909, cited above. A similar proviso, without the word “hereafter,” accompanied the appropriations for the purposes mentioned in the similar appropriation act for the preceding fiscal year.

ACT AUGUST 10, 1912, c. 284. (37 Stat. 269.)

SALARIES, BUREAU OF CHEMISTRY: One chemist, who shall be chief of bureau, five thousand dollars; one chief clerk, two thousand dollars; one executive clerk, two thousand dollars; five clerks, class four; seven clerk, class three; one clerk, one thousand four hundred and forty dollars; twelve clerks, class two; one clerk, one thousand three hundred dollars; eighteen clerks, class one; thirteen clerks, at one thousand and twenty dollars each; eleven clerks, at one thousand dollars each; eighteen clerks, at nine hundred dollars each; one clerk, eight hundred and forty dollars; one assistant property custodian, nine hundred dollars; one chief food and drug inspector, three thousand dollars; one food and drug inspector, two thousand two hundred and fifty dollars; nine food and drug inspectors, at two thousand dollars each; thirteen food and drug inspectors, at one thousand eight hundred dollars each; one food and drug inspector, one thousand six hundred and twenty dollars; eleven food and drug inspectors, at one thousand six hundred dollars each; eight food and drug inspectors, at one thousand four hundred dollars each; two laboratory helpers, at one thousand two hundred dollars each'; one laboratory helper, one thousand and twenty. dollars; four laboratory helpers, at one thousand dollars each; four laboratory helpers, at nine hundred and sixty dollars each; two laboratory helpers, at nine hundred dollars each; six laboratory helpers, at eight hundred and forty dollars each; two laboratory helpers, at seven hundred and eighty dollars each; twenty laboratory helpers, messengers, or laborers, at seven hundred and twenty dollars each; two laboratory helpers, messengers, or laborers, at six hundred and sixty dollars each; twenty-four laboratory helpers, messengers, or laborers, at six hundred dollars each; one laboratory assistant, one thousand two hundred dollars; one tool maker, one thousand two hundred dollars; one janitor, one thousand and twenty dollars; one student assistant, three hundred dollars; two messengers, at eight hundred and forty dollars each; one skilled laborer, one thousand and fifty dollars; one skilled laborer, eight hundred and forty dollars; two messenger boys or laborers, at five hundred and forty dollars each; eight messenger boys or laborers, at four hundred and eighty dollars each; three messenger boys or laborers, at four hundred and twenty dollars each; one messenger boy or laborer, three hundred and sixty dollars; six charwomen, at two hundred and forty dollars each; in all, two hundred and fifty-four thousand six hundred and sixty dollars.

GENERAL EXPENSES, BUREAU OF CHEMISTRY: For necessary expenses in conducting the investigations contemplated by the Act of May fifteenth, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, relating to the application of chemistry to agriculture, and to continue collaboration with other departments of the Government desiring chemical investigations and whose heads request the Secretary of Agriculture for such assistance, and for other miscellaneous work, as follows:

For chemical apparatus, chemicals and supplies, repairs to apparatus, gas, electric current, official traveling expenses, telegraph and telephone service, express and freight charges, thirty thousand dollars;

For the employment of such assistants, clerks, and other persons as the Secretary of Agriculture may consider necessary for the purposes named, in the city of Washington and elsewhere, in conducting investigations, collating and reporting the results of such investigations, and for the rent of buildings outside of the District of Columbia, fifty-five thousand dollars;

For investigating the character of the chemical and physical tests which are applied to American food products in foreign countries, and for inspecting the same before shipment when desired by the shippers or owners of these products intended for countries where chemical and physical tests are required before the said products are allowed to be sold therein, and for all necessary expenses in connection with such inspection and studies of methods of analysis in foreign countries, four thousand two hundred and eighty dollars;

In all, for general expenses, eighty-nine thousand two hundred and eighty dollars.

ENFORCEMENT OF THE FOOD AND DRUGS Act: For enabling the Secretary of Agriculture to carry into effect the provisions of the Act of June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and six, entitled "An Act for preventing the manufacture, sale, or transportation of adulterated, or misbranded, or poisonous, or deleterious foods, drugs, medicines, and liquors, and for regulating traffic therein, and for other purposes," in the city of Washington and elsewhere, including chemical apparatus, chemicals and supplies, repairs to apparatus, gas, electric current, official traveling expenses, telegraph and telephone service, express and freight charges, and all other expenses, employing such assistants, clerks, and other persons as may be considered necessary for the purposes named, and rent outside of the District of Columbia, six hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars.

Total for Bureau of Chemistry, nine hundred and sixty-eight thousand nine hundred and forty dollars.

Act August 10, 1912, c. 284, 37 Stat. 288.

These are provisions of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above.

BUREAU OF SOILS.

ACT JUNE 3, 1902, c. 985. (32 Stat. 286.)
Establishment of bureau.

All existing statutes relating to the Division of Soils, reorganized into the Bureau of Soils, not otherwise repealed, are continued in effect as applying to the said bureau, by a proviso annexed to the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1903, cited above, set forth on p. 11, ante.

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ACT MARCH 2, 1901, c. 805. (31 Stat. 922.)
Chief of bureau.

One soil physicist who shall be Chief of Bureau, * * *
Act March 2, 1901, c. 805, 31 Stat. 931.

This is a provision of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1902, cited above. Provisions in the same words are contained in the similar acts for subsequent fiscal years. The provision in the act

for the fiscal year 1913 is set forth below. ACT AUGUST 10, 1912, c. 284. (37 Stat. 269.)

SALARIES, BUREAU OF Soils: One soil physicist, who shall be chief of bureau, four thousand dollars; one chief clerk, two thousand dollars; one executive assistant, two thousand dollars; three clerks, class four; two clerks, class three; three clerks, class two; one clerk, one thousand two hundred and sixty dollars; eight clerks, class one; four clerks, at one thousand dollars each; three clerks, at nine hundred dollars each; one soil cartographer, one thousand eight hundred dollars; one soil bibliographer, one thousand four hundred dollars; one photographer, one thousand two hundred dollars; three draftsmen, at one thousand two hundred dollars each; one draftsman, one thousand dollars; one messenger, eight hundred and forty dollars; two messengers, messenger boys, or laborers, at four hundred and eighty dollars each; one laborer, six hundred dollars; one laborer, three hundred dollars; one charwoman or laborer, four hundred and eighty dollars; in all, fifty thousand five hundred and forty dollars.

GENERAL EXPENSES, BUREAU OF Soils: For all necessary expenses connected with the investigations and experiments hereinafter authorized, including the employment of investigators, local and special agents, assistants, experts, clerks, draftsmen, and labor in the city of Washington and elsewhere; official traveling expenses, materials, tools, instruments, apparatus, repairs to apparatus, chemicals, furniture, office fixtures, stationery, gas, electric current, telegraph and telephone service, express and freight charges, rent' outside of the District of Columbia, and for all other necessary supplies and expenses, as follows:

For chemical investigations of soil types, soil composition and soil minerals, the soil solution, solubility of soil and all chemical properties of soils in their relation to soil formation, soil texture, and soil productivity, including all routine chemical work in connection with ihe soil survey, eighteen thousand one hundred and thirty-five dollars;

For physical investigations of the important properties of soil which determine productivity, such as moisture relations, aeration, heat conductivity, texture, and other physical investigations of the various soil classes and soil types, eleven thousand two hundred and sixty-five dollars;

For soil-fertility investigations into organic causes of infertility and remedial measures, maintenance of productivity, properties and composition of soil humus, and the transformation and formation of soil "humus by soil organisms, twenty-two thousand two hundred dollars;

For exploration and investigation within the United States to determine a possible source of supply of potash, nitrates, and other natural fertilizers, twenty-five thousand dollars;

For the investigation of the relation of soils to drainage and seepage waters, five thousand dollars;

For the investigation of soils and for indicating upon maps and plats, by coloring or otherwise, the results of such investigations, one hundred and sixty-five thousand dollars;

For general administrative expenses connected with the abovementioned lines of investigation, four thousand two hundred and eighty dollars;

In all, for general expenses, two hundred and fifty thousand eight hundred and eighty. dollars.

Total for Bureau of Soils, three hundred and one thousand four hundred and twenty dollars.

Act August 10, 1912, c. 284, 37 Stat. 290.

These are provisions of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above.

BUREAU OF ENTOMOLOGY.

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ACT APRIL 23, 1904, c. 1486. (33 Stat. 276.)
Chief of bureau.

One entomologist, who shall be chief of bureau,
Act April 23, 1904, c. 1486, 33 Stat. 299.

This is a provision of the agricultural appropriation act for the fiscal year 1905, cited above. Provisions in the same words are contained in the similar acts for subsequent fiscal years. The provision in the act for the fiscal year 1913 is set forth on p. 200, post. The agricultural appropriation acts for the fiscal years 1896 to 1904. inclusive, contain provisions for One entomologist, who shall be chief of division."

ACT JUNE 16, 1880, c. 235. (21 Stat. 259.)
Entomological investigations transferred to Department of Agriculture.

For the completion of the work of the United States Entomological Commission under the Department of the Interior in the special investigation of the Rocky Mountain locust or grasshopper and the cottonworm, * Provided, That after the close of the next fiscal year all work of the character herein provided for shall be exclusively under the control of the Agricultural Department,

Act June 16, 1880, c. 235, 21 Stat. 276.

This is a provision of the sundry civil appropriation act for the fiscal year 1881, cited above.

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ACT MARCH 3, 1905, c. 1501. An act to prohibit importation or interstate trans

portation of insect pests, and the use of the United States mails for that

purpose. (33 Stat. 1269.) Transportation, removal, or importation of insects injurious to crops, vegetables,

trees, etc., except for scientific purposes, forbidden. That no railroad, steamboat, express, stage, or other transportation company shall knowingly transport from one State or Territory into any other State or Territory, or from the District of Columbia into a State or Territory, or from a State or Territory into the District of Columbia, or from a foreign country into the United States, the gypsy moth, brown-tail moth, leopard moth, plum curculio, hop plant-louse, boll weevil, or any of them in a live state, or other insect in a live state which is notoriously injurious to cultivated crops, including vegetables, field crops, bush fruits, orchard trees, forest trees, or shade trees; or the eggs, pupæ, or larvæ of any insect injurious as aforesaid, except when shipped for scientific purposes under the regulations hereinafter provided for; nor shall any person remove from one State or Territory into another State or Territory, or from a foreign country into the United States, or from a State or Territory into the District of Columbia, or from the District of Columbia into any State or Territory, except for scientific purposes under the regulations hereinafter provided for, the gypsy moth, brown-tail moth, leopard moth, plum curculio, hop plant-louse, boll

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