The Edinburgh Review, 226 tomas

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A. and C. Black, 1917
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312 psl. - To build, to plant, whatever you intend. To rear the column, or the arch to bend, To swell the terrace, or to sink the grot; In all, let nature never be forgot.
182 psl. - Whereas it is expedient that provision should be made for regulating the relations between the two Houses of Parliament: And whereas it is intended to substitute for the House of Lords as it at present exists a Second Chamber constituted on a popular instead of hereditary basis...
102 psl. - But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts — for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments, for the rights and liberties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations and make the world itself at last free.
47 psl. - Rejoice, O young man in thy youth ; and let thy heart cheer thee in the days of thy youth, and walk in the ways of thine heart, and in the sight of thine eyes ; but know thou, that for all these things God will bring thee into judgment.
298 psl. - They guide to valley and ridge's end. The kestrel hovering by day, And the little owls that call by night, Bid him be swift and keen as they, As keen of ear, as swift of sight. The blackbird sings to him, ' Brother, brother, If this be the last song you shall sing, Sing well, for you may not sing another; Brother, sing.
313 psl. - We nobly take the high Priori Road, And reason downward, till we doubt of God; Make Nature still encroach upon his plan; And shove him off as far as e'er we can: Thrust some Mechanic Cause into his place; Or bind in Matter, or diffuse in Space.
318 psl. - T' inclose the Lock ; now joins it, to divide. Ev'n then, before the fatal engine closed, A wretched sylph too fondly interposed ; Fate urged the shears, and cut the sylph in twain, (But airy substance soon unites again;) The meeting points the sacred hair dissever From the fair head, for ever, and for ever ! Then flash'd the living lightning from her eyes, And screams of horror rend th
185 psl. - With a perfect Lower House it is certain that an Upper House would be scarcely of any value. If we had an ideal House of Commons perfectly representing the nation, always moderate, never passionate, abounding in men of leisure, never omitting the slow and steady forms necessary for good consideration, it is certain that we should not need a higher chamber. The work would be done so well that we should not want any one to look over or revise it.
95 psl. - A steadfast concert for peace can never be maintained except by a partnership of democratic nations. No autocratic government could be trusted to keep faith within it or observe its covenants.
312 psl. - Bid harbours open, public ways extend, Bid temples worthier of the God ascend, Bid the broad arch the dangerous flood contain, The mole projected break the roaring main ; Back to his bounds their subject sea command, And roll obedient rivers through the land : These honours, peace to happy BRITAIN brings, These are imperial works, and worthy kings.

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