The Book of Humorous Verse

Priekinis viršelis
George H. Doran Company, 1920 - 962 psl.
0 Apžvalgos
Atsiliepimai nepatvirtinti, bet „Google“ ieško netikro turinio ir jį šalina, jei jis aptinkamas

Knygos viduje

Ką žmonės sako - Rašyti recenziją

Neradome recenzijų įprastose vietose.

Turinys

Homœopathic Soup
77
Prehistoric Smith
83
Mans Place in Nature
89
An Old Bachelor
98
Reflections on Cleopatheras Needle Cormac OLeary
106
Hiram Hover
113
Mis Smith
119
Over the
125
A
132
Wing Tee
139
Tu Quoque
146
My Mistresss Boots
153
Noras
159
Larrie ODee
165
The Belle of the Ball
171
Buxom Joan
179
Chloe M
185
Lilies
188
Feminine Arithmetic
191
Gifts Returned
198
The Secret Combination
209
Hae Laid a Herring in Saut
216
Ballade of the Golfer in Love
222
Miniver Cheevy
229
Contentment
238
The Meeting of the Clabberhuses Sam Walter Foss
247
The Three Black Crows
254
Trust in Women Unknown
276
The Friar of Orders Gray John OKeefe
282
That Texan Cattle Man Joaquin Miller
288
The Candidates Creed James Russell Lowell
294
Father Molloy Samuel Lover
308
SkyMaking Mortimer Collins
314
After Horace A D Godley
320
John Grumlie Allan Cunningham
326
Philliss Age Matthew Prior
332
Pessimism Newton Mackintosh
338
The Joys of Marriage Charles Cotton
344
The Annuity
350
Fin de Siecle
357
John G Saxe
362
The Fool and the Poet
363
Lovers and a Reflection
372
Mavrone
378
am
379
Eugene Field
386
The Babys Debut
393
Villons Straight Tip to All Cross
399
An Idyll of Phatte and Leene
406
Here is the Tale
421
The Translated
427
Imitation of Walt Whitman
434
The Confession
443
Nephelidia
459
Ballad
467
Arabella Willson
470
After Dilettante Concetti
474
Owen Seaman
480
The Poets at
486
Ballad of the Canal
492
Home Sweet Home with Varia
504
A MaudleIn Ballad
510
Little Billee
546
The Wofle New Ballad of Jane
552
The Quakers Meeting
576

Kiti leidimai - Peržiūrėti viską

Pagrindiniai terminai ir frazės

Populiarios ištraukos

865 psl. - Twas brillig, and the slithy toves Did gyre and gimble in the wabe; All mimsy were the borogoves, And the mome raths outgrabe. 'Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch ! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch...
562 psl. - JOHN GILPIN was a citizen Of credit and renown, A trainband captain eke was he Of famous London town. John Gilpin's spouse said to her dear, Though wedded we have been These twice ten tedious years, yet we No holiday have seen. To-morrow is our wedding day, And we will then repair Unto the Bell at Edmonton All in a chaise and pair. My sister, and my sister's child, Myself, and children three, Will fill the chaise ; so you must ride On horseback after we.
932 psl. - Gave the lustre of midday to objects below, When, what to my wondering eyes should appear, But a miniature sleigh, and eight tiny reindeer, With a little old driver, so lively and quick, I knew in a moment it must be St. Nick. More rapid than eagles his coursers they came, And he whistled, and shouted, and called them by name; "Now, Dasher! Now, Dancer! Now, Prancer and Vixen! On, Comet! On, Cupid! On, Donder and Blitzen! To the top of the porch! To the top of the wall! Now dash away! Dash away!...
565 psl. - He grasped the mane with both his hands, And eke with all his might. His horse, who never in that sort Had handled been before, What thing upon his back had got Did wonder more and more. Away went Gilpin, neck or nought; Away went hat and wig; He little dreamt when he set out, Of running such a rig.
381 psl. - That never a hall such a galliard did grace ; While her mother did fret, and her father did fume, And the bridegroom stood dangling his bonnet and plume ; And the bride-maidens whispered, "Twere better by far To have matched our fair cousin with young Lochinvar.
108 psl. - GOD makes sech nights, all white an' still Fur 'z you can look or listen, Moonshine an' snow on field an' hill, All silence an' all glisten. Zekle crep' up quite unbeknown An' peeked in thru' the winder, An' there sot Huldy all alone, 'ith no one nigh to hender. A fireplace filled the room's one side With half a cord o' wood in — There warn't no stoves (tell comfort died) To bake ye to a puddin'.
423 psl. - It was surely October On this very night of last year That I journeyed — I journeyed down here! — That I brought a dread burden down here — On this night of all nights in the year, Ah, what demon has tempted me here?
565 psl. - The wind did blow, the cloak did fly Like streamer long and gay, Till loop and button failing both, At last it flew away. Then might all people well discern The bottles he had slung ; A bottle swinging at each side, As hath been said or sung. The dogs did bark, the children screamed, Up flew the windows all ; And every soul cried out, "Well done!
579 psl. - Thoroughbrace bison-skin, thick and wide; Boot, top, dasher, from tough old hide Found in the pit when the tanner died. That was the way he 'put her through.
578 psl. - Now in building of chaises, I tell you what, There is always somewhere a weakest spot, — In hub, tire, felloe, in spring or thill, In panel, or crossbar, or floor, or sill, In screw, bolt, thoroughbrace, — lurking still, Find it somewhere you must and will, — Above or below, or within or without, — And that's the reason, beyond a doubt, A chaise breaks down, but doesn't wear out. But the Deacon swore (as Deacons do, With an "I dew vum...

Bibliografinė informacija