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H U N T'S
MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE AND COMMERCIAL REVIEW

Established July, 1839,
BY FREEMAN HUNT, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.

PUBLISHED MONTHLY,
At 142 Fulton-street, New Yorkat Five Dollars per annum, in Advance.

The "MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE AND COMMERCIAL REVIEW” will continue to include in its design every subject connected with COMMERCE, MANUFACTURES, AND POLITICAL ECONOMY, as-COMMERCIAL LEGISLATION, COMMERCIAL HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY; MERCANTILE BIOGRAPHY ; Essays from the ablest pens on the leading topics of the day, relating to COMMERCIAL AFFAIRS; DESCRIPTIVE, STATISTICAL, AND HistoriCAL ACCOUNTS OF THE VARIOUS COMMODITIES WHICH FORM THE SUBJECT OF MERCANTILE TRANSACTIONS; Port CHARGES; TARIFFS; CUSTOMS AND COMMERCIAL REGULATIONS; TREATIES; COMMERCIAL STATISTICS OF THE UNITED STATES, and the different countries of the world with which we have intercourse, including their PuysICAL CHARACTER, POPULATION, PRODUCTIONS, EXPORTS, IMPORTS, SEAPORTS, MONEYS, Weights, MEASURES, FINANCE AND BANKING Associations ;-ENTERPRISES connected with COMMERCE, embracing FISHERIES, INCORPORATED COMPANIES, RAILROADS, CANALS, STEAMBOATS, Docks, Post OFFICES, &c.; PRINCIPLES OF COMMERCE, FINANCE AND BANKING, WITH PRACTICAL AND HISTORICAL DETAILS AND ILLUSTRATIONS; COMMERCIAL LAW AND MERCANTILE Law REPORTS, AND DECISIONS OF COURTS IN THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE, including InsuRANCE, PARTNERSHIP, PRINCIPAL AND AGENT, BILLS OF EXCHANGE, SALE, GUARANTY, BANKRUPTCY, SHIPPING AND NavigaTION, &c., and whatever else shall tend to develop the resources of the country and the world, and illustrate the various topics bearing upon COMMERCE AND COMMERCIAL LITERATURE; and we may venture lo say that no work heretofore published, embraces in its pages so large an amount of information on all these subjects, as the nineteen volumes now completed.

Our means of enhancing the value of “THE MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE AND COMMERCIAL Review," are constantly increasing; and, with new sources of information, an extending correspondence abroad, and other facilities, which nearly ten years' devotion to a single object have enabled us to make available, we shall be able to render the work a perfect vade mecum for the Merchant, Navigator, and Manufacturer, as well as to the Slatesman, Commercial Lawyer, and Political Economist, and, indeed, all who desire information on the multifarious operations of business life.

EXTRACTS FROM LETTERS ADDRESSED TO THE EDITOR. From Hon. Samuel R. Betts, U. S. District Judge for the From the Hon. Washington Hunt, Member of Congress from Southern District of New York.

New York. "I have received the Merchants' Magazine since its

“I am gratified to learn from your letter that your establishment, and regard it as one of the most valuable valuable Magazine continues to receive a liberal support publications of the day. As a Register of Facts con- from the public. I have long considered it one of tho nected with Political Economy and Industrial Interests, most useful publications in the country. Indeed it may Commercial, Agricultural, and Manufacturing, it is, in be regarded as indispensable, not only to the statesman my judgment, not equalled by any work of its size and but to all who wish to be well-informed respecting the cost, in fullness and accuracy; and its collection of Cases commerce of the world, and the rapid growih and vast and Doctrines in relation to Maritime Law, will be found importance of our own commercial interests. A work of highly useful to professional men-often furnishing so much interest and usefulness ought to have a place in American and English cases of great value, which are every school district library in the United States. I wish not to be found in any other publication. I most cheer- by some such means it might be brought within the reach fully recommend the work as useful in a high degree, of every intelligent man in the country. I am convinced to all professions studying the current history of the that it has done much to liberalize and nationalize the times."

public mind, and I hope your circulation may continue lo

increase, until the patronage of the work shall be equal From Hon. Henry Clay, Ashland, Kentucky. to its merits." “I have long known the great merits of your Maga- From the Hon. Edmund Burke, Commissioner of Patents. zine, the most useful and valuable of all the publications ++++“When it first commenced I thought its content known to me, published in the United States."

presented a rich treat, but from that time to the presen!

it has continued to improve in the variety, excellence. From the Hon. Levi Woodbury, one of the Justices of the and value of the intellectual repast it has monthly pre. United States Court.

sented to its readers. Although professedly devoicd 10 "I have heretofore read most of the numbers of the the interests of that enterprising and enlightened class of Merchants' Magazine with much satisfaction and advan our countrymen, the merchants, it is not more valuable tage. It is exceedingly useful to the politician and I know of do work which equals it in the variety, co

to them than it is to the statesman and political economisi. scholar, as well as those engaged in commercial suits, to have the useful statistical information with piousness, and accuracy of the statistical information: which it abounds, collected together and presented for one of its most valuable features. Another feature in the

which it contains, and which, in my view, constitutes their perusal seasonably."

Magazine which I like very much, is the spirit of free From Hon. John Macpherson Berrien, Senator of the United discussion which pervades its pages. You act wisely in States from Georgia.

permitting all parties to be heard upon the mooted theo

ries of trade and commerce, which involve to some ex " I have been, for some time past, in possession of the tent the great problem of modern civilization, thus keep several volumes and numbers of the Merchants' Maga. ing open and free from obstruction, the only direct avenue zine,' and in the habit of referring to it. I can therefore to truth. unhesitatingly say, that I consider it a very valuable ad- * Your publication is equally creditable to the periodical dition to the library of the statesman, as well as the mer- literature of the day. Iis leading articles exhibit abun chant, and express, as I do cordially, the hope that its dant proof of the ability, research and industry of theu publication may be continued with increased benefit to authors. In short, 1 esteem the Merchants Magazine as yourself, as I feel assured it will be with advantage to second to no publication of the kind, published in this or the public."

any other country." OT A few complete sets of the MERCHANTS' MAGAZINE, embracing NINETEEN semi-annual volumes, of more than 600 large octavo pages each, bringing it down to December, 1848, may be obtained at the Publisher's Offica. 12 Fultou-street, New V the subscription price.

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