The Elocutionist's Annual ...: Comprising New and Popular Readings, Recitations, Declamations, Dialogues, Tableaux, Etc., Etc, 8 leidimas

Priekinis viršelis
National School of Elocution and Oratory, 1883
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115 psl. - For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night. Thou carriest them away as with a flood ; they are as a sleep : in the morning they are like grass which groweth up. In the morning it flourisheth, and groweth up; in the evening it is cut down, and withereth. For we are consumed by thine anger, and by thy wrath are we troubled. Thou hast set our iniquities before thee, our secret sins in the light of thy countenance.
186 psl. - But, soft! what light through yonder window breaks! It is the east, and Juliet is the sun ! — Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, Who is already sick and pale with grief, That thou her maid art far more fair than she...
186 psl. - tis not to me she speaks: Two of the fairest stars in all the heaven, Having some business, do entreat her eyes To twinkle in their spheres till they return.
91 psl. - I SHOT an arrow into the air, It fell to earth I knew not where ; For, so swiftly it flew, the sight Could not follow it in its flight. I breathed a song into the air, It fell to earth, I knew not where ; For who has sight so keen and strong, That it can follow the flight of song ! Long, long afterward, in an oak I found the arrow, still unbroke ; And the song, from beginning to end, I found again in the heart of a friend.
11 psl. - Weep awhile, if ye are fain — Sunshine still must follow rain; Only not at death — for death, Now I know, is that first breath Which our souls draw when we enter Life, which is of all life center.
115 psl. - Lord, Thou hast been our dwelling place in all generations. Before the mountains were brought forth, or ever Thou hadst formed the earth and the world, Even from everlasting to everlasting, Thou art God.
185 psl. - Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me, from the crown to the toe, top-full Of direst cruelty ! make thick my blood ; Stop up the access and passage to remorse, That no compunctious visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between The effect and it...
144 psl. - I am not one of those, sir, who esteem any tribute of regard, whether light and occasional, or more serious and deliberate, which may be bestowed on others, as so much unjustly. withholden from themselves. But the tone and manner of the gentleman's question forbid me that I thus interpret it.
44 psl. - I blow the bellows, I forge the steel, In all the shops of trade ; I hammer the ore, and turn the wheel, Where my arms of strength are made ; I manage the furnace, the mill, the mint ; I carry, I spin, I weave ; And all my doings I put into print On every Saturday eve. I've no muscle to weary, no breast to decay, No bones to be "laid on the shelf," And soon I intend you "may go and play," While I manage the world by myself.
145 psl. - I never shall be, into crimination and recrimination, the honorable member may, perhaps, find, that, in that contest, there will be blows to take as well as blows to give; that others can state comparisons as significant, at least, as his own, and that his impunity may, perhaps, demand of him whatever powers of taunt and sarcasm he may possess.

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