Dostoevsky: Language, Faith and Fiction

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Bloomsbury Publishing, 2008-04-09 - 304 psl.
When an Archbishop of Canterbury takes time off to write a book about Dostoevsky, this is a sign of great hope and encouragement for The Church of England and for all those who seek God.

The current rash of books hostile to religious faith will one day be an interesting subject for some sociological analysis.
But to counter such work, is a book of the profoundest kind about the nature and purpose of religious belief. Terrorism, child abuse, absent fathers and the fragmentation of the family, the secularisation and the sexualisation of culture, the future of liberal democracy, the clash of cultures and the nature of national identity - so many of the anxieties that we think of as being quintessentially features of the early twenty first century and on, are present in the work of Dostoevsky - in his letters, his journalism and above all in his fiction.

The world we inhabit as readers of his novels is one in which the question of what human beings owe to each other is left painfully and shockingly open and there is no place to stand from which we can construct a clear moral landscape. But the novels of Dostoevsky continually press home what else might be possible if we - characters and readers - saw the world in another light, the light provided by faith. In order to respond to such a challenge the novels invite us to imagine precisely those extremes of failure, suffering and desolation. There is an unresolved tension in Dostoevsky's novels- a tension between believing and not believing in the existence of God. In The Brothers Karamazov, we can all receive Ivan with a terrible kind of delight. Ivan's picture of himself we immediately recognise as self-portrait. The god that is dead for him is dead for us. This Karamazov God of tension and terror is often the only one we are able to find. This extraordinary book will speak to our generation like few others.

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LibraryThing Review

Vartotojo apžvalga  - Michael_Godfrey - LibraryThing

Densely written, Williams sometimes needs to trim his sentences from ten lines down to two or three to sustain clear meaning. It would be necessary, in order to do justice to his work however, to be ... Skaityti visą apžvalgą

LibraryThing Review

Vartotojo apžvalga  - zappa - LibraryThing

Densely written, Williams sometimes needs to trim his sentences from ten lines down to two or three to sustain clear meaning. It would be necessary, in order to do justice to his work however, to be ... Skaityti visą apžvalgą

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Apie autorių (2008)

Rowan Williams (Baron Williams of Oystermouth) is Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge, UK. He was formerly Lady Margaret Professor of Divinity at the University of Oxford, UK, and was Archbishop of Canterbury from 2002 - 2012.

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