Puslapio vaizdai
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He faw but little of the family at the rectory. Mrs. Evans declined rapidly; her husband feemed to need all the confolations of strong fenfe and chriftian fortitude to fupport the fhock, and the gentle Lucy funk, like a broken lily under the beating of "the pitiless ftorm." She feemed ftudiously to fhun converfing with Mr. Powerfcourt; and when an interview was unavoidable, fhe was not only dejected but referved. As he once attempted to recall to her rememberance the joyous fcenes of ju venile amusement, when the manor-house and the parfonage feemed alternately the temple of innocent cheerfulness, the turned fuddenly, and, gazing at him. with a penetrating fmile, obferved," that the temples remained, but they had "loft the goddefs who irradiated the " scene."

Disappointed in his expectations of finding confolation in thofe objects which ufed to adminifter delight, Henry at laft answered fir William's inquiries of what he could do to ferve him, by re-marking that he thought the falubrious climate of Italy might be of fervice to his health, and that the numerous objects which it reprefented to the curious eye might diffipate the languor which indifpofition excited. Though fir William was convinced that England, particularly Caernarvonshire, was the most healthful climate in the world, and contained a fufficient number of wonders to entertain any rational man, yet he thought that the whimsies of fick people fhould be treated with the fame indulgence as their palled appetites. His affent was accompanied by a liberal allowance; but he charged him to stop in London, and, if lord Monteith and Geraldine

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raldine had not left it, to make their houfe his home for a few weeks. "The

"company of your coufin," said he, "will do you good; and my lord is "ftill livelier than fhe is. Beside, you

may have an opportunity of getting "the best medical advice the kingdom "affords; and, I charge you, don't be guided by outlandish physicians while

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you are abroad, for they never can "understand what is proper for an "English constitution. I have no " doubt, Henry, that your good sense "will keep you from running wild, as

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many of our young fly-about travel"lers do; and I dare fay you will not "difgrace my regard for you, by pre"tending, when you come back again, "to like other countries better than "your own."

No physician at that time refiding in London who "could minifter to a

mind diseased," or who could " pluck from the memory a rooted forrow," Mr. Powerfcourt did not apply for medical affiftance; and he regretted that the established laws of fociety compelled him either to vifit the fair troubler of his peace before he left England, or, by attempting excuses to which his ingenuous nature was unequal, excite fufpicions of a fecret which he flattered himself was confined to his own bofom. He called at Portland-place at an unfeasonable hour, and without previously annourcing his intentions. He was, however, admitted, contrary to his hopes, and found himself in the countefs's dreffing-room before he had acquired fufficient fortitude to support the trying interview. He advanced with timid fteps, refigned her offered hand with refpectful coldnefs, and glancing his eyes over the 0 6 happy

happy envied Monteith, took a chair, and attempted a perplexed conversation.

His lordship immediately found that his intended raillery had loft all its enticing piquancy. The dejection, embarraffment, and evident indifpofition of his rival affected his good nature, and he ftrove by repeated attentions to dif fipate his confufion. But as it rather increased than diminished, his lordship recollected that his behaviour might have an air of infult; and after two or three attempts to occupy his own mind by reading the charades written on a firefcreen, he at last confidered, that the moft conciliating condut he could adopt would be to take himself out of the room, which, after defiring Henry to fpend the day with them, he immediately did, with too much precipitation to hear his reply.

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