The American's Own Book: Containing the Declaration of Independence, with the Lives of the Signers : the Constitution of the United States : the Inaugural Addresses and First Annual Messages of All the Presidents from Washington to Pierce : the Farewell Addresses of George Washington and Andrew Jackson : with a Portrait and Life of Each President of the United States, to the Present Time

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Leavitt & Allen, 1855 - 496 psl.
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