History of American Literature

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American Book Company, 1911 - 431 psl.
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This volume describes the greatest achievements in American literature, from the earliest times to the present. Special attention has been paid to the individual works of great authors, but also to literary movements, ideals, and animating principles, and the relation of all these to English literature. The author hopes this book will inspire students to investigate for themselves the remarkable American record of spirituality, initiative, and democratic accomplishment contained in our national literature.

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It is interesting to read an American Literature textbook from almost 100 years ago, when many famous American authors were still around. Also some that were later not as famous. There is a good index and biographical section the the back. As always, these older texts are good reading. Skaityti visą apžvalgą

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