Lectures on Shakespeare

Priekinis viršelis
Princeton University Press, 2019-10-08 - 432 psl.

From one of the great modern writers, the acclaimed lectures in which he draws on a lifetime of experience to take the measure of Shakespeare's plays and sonnets

"W. H. Auden, poet and critic, will conduct a course on Shakespeare at the New School for Social Research beginning Wednesday. Mr. Auden . . . proposes to read all Shakespeare's plays in chronological order." So the New York Times reported on September 27, 1946, giving notice of a rare opportunity to hear one of the century's great poets discuss at length one of the greatest writers of all time. Reconstructed by Arthur Kirsch, these lectures offer remarkable insights into Shakespeare's plays and sonnets while also adding immeasurably to our understanding of Auden.

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Turinys

Henry VI Parts One Two and Three 3
3
13
13
The Comedy of Errors and The Two Gentlemen of Verona 23
23
Loves Labours Lost
33
A Midsummer Nights Dream
53
The Taming of the Shrew King John and Richard II
63
Henry IV Parts One and Two and Henry V
101
The Merry Wives of Windsor
124
Alls Well That Ends Well
181
Antony and Cleopatra
231
Timon of Athens
255
Pericles and Cymbeline
270
Concluding Lecture
308
APPENDIX I
321
Fall Term Final Examination
341
Audens Markings in Kittredge
347

Troilus and Cressida
166

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Apie autorių (2019)

W. H. Auden, who was born in York, England, on February 21, 1907, is one of the most successful and well-known poets of the 20th century. Educated at Oxford, Auden served in the Spanish Civil War, which greatly influenced his work. He also taught in public schools in Scotland and England during the 1930s. It was during this time that he rose to public fame with such works as "Paid on Both Sides" and "The Orators." Auden eventually immigrated to the United States, becoming a citizen in 1946. It was in the U.S. that he met his longtime partner Chester Kallman. Stylistically, Auden was known for his incomparable technique and his linguistic innovations. The term Audenesque became an adjective to describe the contemporary sounding speech reflected in his poems. Auden's numerous awards included a Bollingen Prize in Poetry, A National Book Award for "The Shield of Achilles," a National Medal for Literature from the National Book Committee, and a Gold Medal from the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Numerous volumes of his poetry remain available today, including "About the House" and "City Without Walls." W.H. Auden died on September 28, 1973 in Vienna.

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