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AND A BOTTLE OF

KUNTALINE

Are all that is required to help the growth of your hair. When the faithful use of Kuntaline leads you more often than usual, to your mirror, and you find the once-thin hair grown to graceful profusion and radiant with life, you may ask yourself why you did not, long before, use this fragrant restorative Kuntaline, which has been in great demand by people of taste and refinement. Once you use Kuntaline all other hair oils lose their charms.

Put up in following odours :

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Sweet, Lily, Rose, Jasmin, Lotus, Violet., Bouquet.¡ For prices and terms of Sub-Agency, please apply to: K.N.V. Iyer & Co., 13/286, Appa Buildings,

China Bazaar, G. T., Madras.

65, Bowbazaar Street,

CALCUTTA.

USE

KESHAVKANT HAIR OIL.

QUITE FREE FROM WHITE OIL. The best Hair Tonic and the most Fragrant and the cheapest in Market

B. B.

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Rs. 1,000 to be given to any one who will prove that White Oil (which is injurious to Hair) is used in KESHAVKANT HAIR OIL.

TRIAL SOLICITED.

Re. 0-12-0 per Bottle.

The Hind Button Factory and Metal

Works
AND

THE KESHAV PERFUMERY WORKS, 147, Abdul Rehman Street, BOMBAY.

Ask for a free sample from :

DWARKADAS JAGMOHANDAS & CO.,

PROPRIETORS:

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A MONTHLY PERIODICAL DEVOTED TO THE DISCUSSION OF ALL TOPICS OF INTEREST. EDITED BY MR. G. A. NATESAN.

APRIL, 1919

Vol. XX.

A LESSON FROM CHINA

BY

THE HON. JUSTICE SIR JOHN WOODROFFE.

OR a long time past I have not come across a book of its kind which has so pleased me as Mr. A. E. Grantham's recently published volume called "Pencil Speakings from Peking." Though it treats of China, there is much in it which bears upon the question of what young India should, and what modern Europe should not, be or do. It contains much wisdom and displays fully that passion for beauty which is a marked trace of the best European minds.

The Chinese sages spoke of the three spheres of Heaven, Earth, and Man; of spiritual influences, of material objects, of the self and social relationships. The official name of Peking is Shun T'ien Fu or "Obedient to Heaven." How fine is the mentality which the choice of such a title indicates! It is by obedience to Heaven that the state prospers. The Chinese selected neither politics, military glory, trade nor other appeal to pride, greed, or vanity but obedience to Heaven-to the Tao-submission to the principles of reason and righteousness as the standard of their lives. This has been, says Mr. Grantham, the secret of their amazing vitality. Equal sacredness is attached to all three worlds and equal reverence is enjoined towards them. The western mind in its periods of superficiality has marked off the divine from the profane. The east sees the divine in all. Moreover, the Chinese are an artistic and emotional people swayed by delight in poetry and natural beauty. It is depressing in this country

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to observe the lack of interest in the beauty of nature, or the incapacity to appreciate it. Those who are hungry and anxious have good excuse, but not all are that. There is no true culture where beauty is not seen. The universe is a veritable Song whose sounds (Shabda) and harmonies (Chhandah) are greater than any other music.

Has not India also been sustained until to-day by the spiritual character of Her civilisation? In China, reverence externally elaborated itself in the observance of forms and ceremonies which the ordinary western and his eastern imitator think unnecessary. A vulgar temperament, and a commercial " race against time," are hostile to the mannered leisure of the past. The author truly says:

"The twentieth-century Chinaman who gives up his traditional regard for ceremoniousness loses far more than the outer show of a superficial politeness; the mainstay of his self-discipline is shaken. And perhaps it is not only the Oriental who degenerates into quite a despicable type of being when he discards the strait-jacket of traditional manners: for the Western counterpart of K'ung-fu-tsze's princely man, the English gentleman, is likewise moulded far more effectually by devotion to form than by fear of punishment in a future world, in which, for practical purposes, he only takes the most tepid interest."

The ancient Chinese sought guidance in the Divine Way, the manifest Tao creating and maintaining life. They saw holiness in Heaven

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