Puslapio vaizdai
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Keep thy heart with all diligence: for out of it | are the issues uv life.

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He that gathereth in summer | is a wise son; but he that sleepeth in harvest | is à son that causeth shame.

Honorable age is not that which standeth in length uv time; nor that which is measured by number uv years; but wisdom | is the gray hair to man; and an unspotted life is old age.

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That every day has its pains and sorrows, is universally experienc'd, and almost universally confess'd. But let us attend not only to mournful truths: if we look impartially about us, we shall find, that every day has likewise its pleasures and its joys.

Reason's whole pleasure, all the joys uv sense, lie in three words, health, peace 'nd competence: but health I consists with temperance alone, and peace, O.virtue! peace I is all thy own.

And where the finest streams | through tangl'd forests stray, ev'n there the wildest beasts steal forth 1 upon ther prey. The Lord has betroth'd his church in eternal covI enant to himself. His quick'ning spirit | shall never depart from her. Arm'd with divine virtue, his gospel, secret, silent, unobserv'd, enters the hearts uv men, and sets up an everlasting kingdom.

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Stand in awe and sin not: commune with yer own heart upon yur bed, and be still. Offer the sacrifices uv righteousness, and put yur trust in the Lord. O Lord, thou hast search'd me, and known me. Thou knowest mi downsitting, and mine uprising, thou un

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derstandest mi thought afar off. Thou compassest my path, and mi lying down, and art acquainted with all mi ways. For there is not a word in my tongue, but lo, O Lord, thou knowest it altogether.

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And God spake all these words, saying, I am the Lord, thy God, which have brought thee out uv the land uv Egypt, out uv the house uv bondage.

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before me.

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Thou shalt have no other gods Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness uv any thing that is in heav'n above, or that is in the earth beneaтH, or that is in the waI ters under the earth: thou shalt not bow down thyself to them, nor serve them: for I the Lord thy God am ǎ jealous God, visiting the iniquity uv the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation uv them that hate me; and showing mercy unto thousands uv them that love me, and keep my commandments.

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Thou shalt not take the name uv the Lord thy God in vain for the Lord will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain.

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Remember the Sabbath day to keep it holy. Six days shalt thou labor, and do all thy work: but the seventh day is the Sabbath uv the Lord thy God: in it thou shalt not do any work, thou, nor thy son, nur thy daughter, thy man-servant, nor thy maid-servant, nur thy cattle, nur thy stranger that is within thy gates: for in six days the Lord made heav'n and earth, the sea and all that in them is, and rested the sev'nth day : wher'fore the Lord bless'd the Sabbath day, and hallow'd it.

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Honor thy father and thy mother; that thy days may be long upon the land | which the Lord thy God I giveth thee.-Thou shalt not kill.-Thou shalt not commit adultery.-Thou shalt not steal.-Thou shalt not bear false witness agenst thy neighbor.

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Thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's house, thou shalt not covet thy neighbor's wife, nor his man-servant, nor his maid-servant, nor his ox, nur his ass, nor any thing I that is thy neighbor's.

LESSON XII.

EXAMINATION ON INFLECTIONS AND EMPHASIS.

It is an excellent way to instruct a class in reading, to ask each pupil when he has read a passage, to state how he read it, and then to give his reasons why he read it as he did. This method was suggested by the practice I long pursued in teaching Latin and Greek. When a pupil had translated a passage, I never could depend upon his really understanding it, till he gave me the analysis. And if I neglected this process for awhile for the purpose of going over more ground, I found that the class soon made their calculations accordingly: and rarely prepared themselves to go beyond what they expected to be examined upon.

The practice of requiring pupils to give reasons for what they say and do in their scholastic exercises, is productive of many advantages: it tends to give them greater facility in expression; greater accuracy in study

and observation; and establishes a habit most favorable to the growth of the thinking and reasoning faculties. Thus trained, they will not be apt to think they know a thing unless they are able clearly to express it.

If the pupil commit his part of the lesson to memory, and be required to speak it, and then illustrate it to the eye on the black-board or slate; or if he come with it plainly written out, he will be likely to improve faster than by merely reading from the book. What he utters will be likely to have a more colloquial cast; and the examples treasured in his memory, after careful correction, will serve as landmarks, to aid him to remember and apply just principles. Take the following plan for examining a class of twelve pupils as the general outline of what I mean.

Teacher.

On this occasion, as on the last, each of the class was required to bring examples to illustrate the inflections, divisions, emphasis and cadence. I will call upon Master A. to give the lead.

A. There is a tide in the affairs of mén,

Whích, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune:
Omitted, all the voyage of their lífe |

Is bound in shallows and in misèries.

In the first two lines, all the divisions except the last, end with rising slides, because something more was needed to form the sense; and the last, with the falling slide, because the sense was formed in the two last, I have used the same slides for the same reasons. Had the sentence closed at shallows, sense would have been complete, and I should have used the falling slide to show

it: but as it did not, I gave it the rising slide to intimate that more was yet to come.

Teacher.—What are the divisions you speak of?

A. The first line has two distinct thoughts, which I have indicated by two distinct divisions. "There is a tide" forms one, and, "in the affairs of men," the other; separated from each by a slight suspension, and marked by a half bar. The third line has also two distinct thoughts and divisions, and the last one is "all the voyage of their life;" which I have separated from the next line by a bar all the other divisions are separated by punctuation.

Teacher. A very good example, and well managed, if it is right to read the passage without emphasis. Who can show a better way to read it?

B.-It seemed to me rather tame as it was read. I should change the rising slide on tide to the falling, which would make it emphatic; and the rising slide on flood to the rising curve, which would make that emphatic; I would also give a rising curve to omitted, which would make that so; and the falling slide to life to emphasize that; and a rising curve to shallows, for the same reason; and I think all would be much improved by the change. The cadence was good but I will mark the whole, as I think it would be best to read it.

There is a tide | in the affairs of mén,

Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;

Omítted, all the voyage of their life |

Is bound in shallows and in mis

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