Puslapio vaizdai
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6. SUBLIME DESCRIPTION.

The cloud-capt tówers, the gorgeous pálaces,
The solemn témples, the great globe itsèlf, '
Yea, all which it inhèrits, shall dissólve,
And, like the baseless fabric of a vísion,
Leave not a wreck behind! we are such stuff!
As dreams are made of, and our little life '
Is rounded with a sleep.

7. VALUE OF COMMON SENSE.

Fine sense I and exalted sense 1 are not half so valuable as common sense. There are forty men of sense I for one man of wit: and he that will carry nothing about with him but gold, will be every day at a loss for ready change.

8. THE WOLF AND CRANE.

A wolf with too much eagerness, swallowed a bóne; which, unfortunately, stuck in his throat. In the violence of his pain, he applied to several animals, earnestly entreating them to extract it. None of them dared hazard the dangerous experiment, but the cràne; who, persuaded by his solemn promises of a compensation, ventured to thrust her enormous length of neck down his throat; and, having successfully performed the operation, claimed the recompense.

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"See how unreasonable some creatures àre," said the wolf; "have I not suffered thee safely to draw thy neck out of my jaws, and hast thou the conscience to demand a further reward?"

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By this fable, it is shown, that the utmost extent of some men's gratitude, is barely to refrain from oppressing and injuring their benefactors.

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9. THE FOX AND RAVEN.

A fox | observing a ráven perched on the branch of a tree, with a fine piece of cheese in his mouth, immediately began to consider how he might possèss | so delicate a morsel. 1

"Dear màdam," said he, "I am extremely glad I to have the pleasure of seeing you this morning; your beautiful shape | and shining feathers | are the delight of my eyes." "Would you condescend to favor me with a song? I doubt not but your voice | is equal to the rest of your accomplishments."

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Deluded by this flattering speech, the transported raven opened her mouth to give him a specimen of her pipe, when down dropped the cheese, which the fox instantly snatched up, and bore away in triumph; leaving the raven to lament her credulous vanity at I her leisure.

The moral of the fable appears to be this: wherever flattery gains admission, it seems to banish common

sense.

10. DOMESTIC ENJOYMENT.

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What a smiling aspect | does the love of parents and children, of brothers and sisters, of friends and relátions, give to every surrounding object, and every returning day! With what a lustre | does it gild even the small habitation, where this placid intercourse

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dwells where such scenes of heartfelt satisfaction! succeed uninterruptedly to one another.

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11. GOD'S BENEVOLENT DESIGNS.

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How many clear marks of benevolent intention appear every where around us! What a profusion of beauty and ornament is poured forth on the face of nature! What a magnificent spectacle presented to the view of màn! What a supply contrived for his wants! What a variety of objects set before him, to gratify his senses, to employ his understanding, to entertain his imagination, to chéer and gládden his heart!

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12. TIME, AN ESTATE.

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An Italian philosopher expressed in his motto, that "tíme I was his estàte." An estate, indeed, which will produce nothing without cultivation; but which will always abundantly repay the labors of industry, and satisfy the most extensive desires, if no part of it be suffered to lie waste by negligence, to be overrun with noxious plants, or laid out for shów rather than use.

13. HOPE OF FUTURE HAPPINESS.

The hope of future happiness is a perpetual source of consolation' to good mén. Under trouble, it soothes their minds; amidst temptation, it supports their vírtue; and, in their dying moments, enables them to say, “O' deàth! whère is thy sting? O' gráve ! whère is thy victory ?

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14. MODESTY.

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It is a sure indication of good sense to be dìffident of it. We then, and not till thén, are growing wisc, when we begin to discern how weak and unwise we are. An absolute perfection of understanding is impossible; he makes the nearest approaches to it, who has the sense to discern and the humility to acknówledge, its imperfèctions. Modesty always sits gracefully upon youth; it covers a multitude of fáults, and doubles the lustre of every virtue which it seems to hide the perfections of men being like those flowers which appear more beautiful, when their leaves are a little contracted and folded up, than when they are full blown, and display themselves, without any reserve, to the view.

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15. OPPOSITION.

A certain amount of opposition, says John Neal, is a great help to a man. I Kites rise against and not with the wind. Even a head wind is better than none. No man ever worked his passage any where in a dead calm. Let no man wax pale, therefore, because of opposition. Opposition is what he wants, and must have to be good for any thing. Hardship is the 1 native soil of manhood and self-reliance. He that cannot abide the storm without flinching or quáiling, strips himself in the sunshine, and lays down by the wayside, to be overlooked and forgotten. He who but braces himself to the struggle, when the winds blow, gives up when they have dóne, and falls asleep in the stillness that follows.

LESSON XXIX.

1. VIRTUE ITS OWN REWARD.-Home Journal.

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Every man, under God, has his destiny in his own hands. If he will be virtuous, he may be. If he is. virtuous, he cannot but be happy. Like the suffering Redeemer, he may and will be "a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief:" but his consolation shall flow like a river, and his righteousness and happiness shall roll like the waves of a peaceful sea; following one after another, until they bear him to the bright and beautiful land beyond the tomb. Art thou poor? art thou tried by thine infirmities? art thou persecuted by enemies? Still "hope on, hope èver," be the motto of thy life. Still be virtuous and thy triumph shall be certain. "I do not know a single young man," says Harry Woodland, "who started with me in life, guided by a virtuous intent, who has failed of success. Many of that class are scattered to and fro in the earth. Fierce blasts and pelting storms beat upon many of them to this day, but every one of them now living | who has been virtuous, has won for himself a good degree in his sphere; and many shall rise up and bless the hour! when these young men were born.

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2. GRATITUDE.-Joseph Addison. B. 1672, d. 1719.
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There is not a more pleasing exercise of the mind, than gratitude. It is accompanied with so great inward satisfaction that the duty is sufficiently rewarded' by

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