Essays: Second series

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G. Routledge, 1898 - 270 psl.
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297 psl. - in every hour, paid or unpaid; see only that thou work, and thou canst not escape the reward: whether thy work be fine or coarse, planting corn or writing epics, so only it be honest work, done to thine own approbation, it shall earn a reward to the senses as well as to the thought: no matter how often defeated, you are born to victory. The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.
25 psl. - These are auxiliaries to the centrifugal tendency of a man, to his passage out into free space, and they help him to escape the custody of that body in which he is pent up, and of that jail-yard of individual relations in which he is enclosed.
17 psl. - As the eyes of Lyncseus were said to see through the earth, so the poet turns the world to glass, and shows us all things in their right series and procession.
65 psl. - She comes eating and drinking and sinning. Her darlings, the great, the strong, the beautiful, are not children of our law, do not come out of the Sunday School, nor weigh their food, nor punctually keep the commandments.
197 psl. - In like manner, there is throughout nature something mocking, something that leads us on and on, but arrives nowhere, keeps no faith with us. All promise outruns the performance. We live in a system of approximations. Every end is prospective of some other end, which is also temporary ; a round and final success nowhere.
10 psl. - Every spirit as it is more pure, And hath in it the more of heavenly light, So it the fairer body doth procure To habit in, and it more fairly dight With cheerful grace and amiable sight. For of the soul the body form doth take : For soul is form, and doth the body make.
74 psl. - If I have described life as a flux of moods, I mnst now add, that there is that in us which changes not, and which ranks all sensations and states of mind. The consciousness in each man is a sliding scale, which identifies him now with the First Cause, and now with the flesh of his body ; life above life, in infinite degrees.
173 psl. - Nature. The rounded world is fair to see, Nine times folded in mystery : Though baffled seers cannot impart The secret of its laboring heart, Throb thine with Nature's throbbing breast, And all is clear from east to west.
43 psl. - EXPERIENCE. THE lords of life, the lords of life,— I saw them pass, In their own guise, Like and unlike, Portly and grim, Use and Surprise, Surface and Dream, Succession swift, and spectral Wrong; Temperament without a tongue, And the inventor of the game Omnipresent without name ; — Some to see, some to be guessed, They marched from east to west : Little man, least of all, Among the legs of his guardians tall, Walked about with puzzled look : — Him by the hand dear nature took; Dearest nature,...
243 psl. - I am very much struck in literature by the appearance that one person wrote all the books; as if the editor of a journal planted his body of reporters in different parts of the field of action, and relieved some by others from time to time ; but there is such equality and identity both of judgment and point of view in the narrative that it is plainly the work of one all-seeing, all-hearing gentleman.

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