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OF

LANGUAGE,

OR A POPULAR VIEW OF

NATURAL LANGUAGE, IN ALL ITS VARIED DIS-
PLAYS, IN THE ANIMATE AND THE
INANIMATE WORLD;

AND AS CORRESPONDING WITH

Instinct, Intelligence and Reason;

A PHYSIOLOGICAL DESCRIPTION OF THE ORGANS OF VOICE; AN
ACCOUNT OF THE ORIGIN OF ARTIFICIAL, SPOKEN
LANGUAGE; AND A BRIEF ANALYSIS OF
ALPHABETICAL SOUNDS.

BY BENJ. F. TAYLOR, A. M.

WITH AN

INTRODUCTION

BY ASAHEL C. KENDRICK, A. M.

PROFESSOR OF THE GREEK LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE IN THE
THEO. INSTITUTION.

HAMILTON LIT. AND

[ILLUSTRATED.]

HAMILTON, N. Y.-J. & D. ATWOOD:

UTICA:-BENNETT, BACKUS & HAWLEY.

1842.

KD 61406

1233131.5

HARVARD COLLEGE

July 11.1924

LIBRARY

Essex Sivstitute

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY
LIRARY
DEC 5 1961

ENTERED according to Act of Congress, in the year 1842, by J. & D. ATWOOD, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Northern District of the State of New York.

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PREFACE.

To manifest indifference, where we apprehend censure― to ask for sympathy, where we cannot hope for praise-to pronounce the sentence "mene tekel," upon every similar effort to perpetrate the most daring deeds of literary piracy, and then, pirate-like, attempt to scuttle the good ship that we have rifled, are too much "tricks of the trade," either to obtain credence or disarm criticism.

The old Sculptor, who placed the Parian statue in the forum, that every passer-by might mark thereon, what seemed faulty to him, met a fate, which has many parallels in this "age of print."

A Grecian disfigured the nose because it was Roman, and a Roman battered the lip because it was Grecian. A crippled soldier deprived it of an arm, a gladiator demolished an eye, and a boor mutilated the bust; and when the artist went forth to profit by the comments of his teachers, he saw the beautiful creation that had heaved, as with life, beneath his chisel, and become human-intellectual-noble, beneath the tracings of his graver, dashed from its pedestal, a heap of misshapen fragments. As he sadly gathered them up, he learned that while demolition is the pastime of the many, the design and the execution are the unremunerated labors of the few.

I do not claim a martyr's niche, as some do, for I wrote all for love-the love of the subject; and if my reader feels half the pleasure in the perusal, that I experienced in the production of it, he will have as little claim to such a distinction as I have.

Indeed, so deeply am I interested in the subject, that I contemplate its continuation in a subsequent volume. If this

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