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e. Table Illustrating the Growth of Cotton Manufacture

by Sections of the U. S., 1840-19148

[The quantities are given in running bales, except those for production in 1850, 1860, and 1870, which are in equivalent 400-
pound bales, and those for consumption from 1840 to 1870, and for foreign cotton which are in equivalent
500-pound bales. Linters are included.]

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1914

1913

610,277

1,987,897

614,999

1,981,089

1,855,714

14,613,964 5,884,733 3,023,415 2,251,041
32,107,572 12,711,303 17,408,372
14,090,863 5,786,330 2,960,518 2,210,813
31,519,766 12,227,226 17,311,451
1912. 16,109,349 5,367,583 2,712,223 2,108,360 547,000 30,578,528 11,582,869 17,139,945
1911. 11,965,962 4,704,978 2,328,487 1,911,092 465,399 29,522,597 11,084,623 16.510,981 1,926,993
1910.. 10,386,209 4,798,953 2,292,333 2,016,386 490,234 28,266,862 10,494,112 15,735,086 2,037,664
1909.. 13,432,131 5,240,719 2,553,797 2,144,448 542,474 28,018,305 10,429,200 15,591,851 1,997,254
1908 11,325,882 4,539,090 2,187,096 1,894,835 457,159 27,505,422 10,200,903 15,329,333
1907 13,305,265 4,984,936 2,410,993 2,073,355 500,588 26,375,191 9,527,964 14,912,517
1906. 10,725,602 4,909,279 2,373,577 2,059,900 475,802 25,250,096 8,994,868 14,407,580
1905.. 13,697,310 24,278,980 22,140,151 21,753,282 2385,547 23,687,495 7,631,331 14,202,971 1,853,193
9,507,786 3,873,165 1,523,168 1,909,498 440,499 19,472,232 4,367,688 13,171,377 1,933,167
7,472,511 2,518,409 538,895 1,502,177 477,337 14,384,180
5,755,359 31,570,344 3188,748 $1,129,498 8252,098 $10,653,435

1900..
1890 ..
1880 ..

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1,975,186

1,934,710

1,847,648

1,570,288 10,934,297 1,879,595
3561,360 38,632,087 81,459,988

327,871 5,498,308 1,306,236
324,052 3,858,962 1,052,713
264,571 2,958,536

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774,915

2,063,915

236,525

71,000

158,708 6,817

2,284,631

180,927 1,597,394

506,310

1 Relates to crop of preceding year.

8 Bulletin No. 128, U. S. Dept. of Commerce: Washington, 1914; p. 16.

2 Does not include foreign cotton.

3 Cotton mills only.

3. THE WORLD

a. The World's Cotton Crops, 1902-1914°

(Bales of approximately 500 lbs.-000 omitted)

1902-8 1903-4 1904-5 1905-6 1906-7 1907-8 1908-9 1909-10 1910-11 1911-12 1912-13 1913-14 1914-15

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3,122 3,692

Estimate 3,367 3,161 3,791 3,416 4,934 10,758 10,124 13,557 11,320 13,551 11,582 13,829 10,651 12,132 16,043 14,129 14,610 16,500

4,718

3,853

3,288

4,395 5,201

5,000

Egypt

1,168

1,302 1,263

1,192 1,390

1,447

1,150

1,000

1,515

1,485

1,507

1,537

1,300

Russia

342

477

536

604 759

664

698

686

895

875

911

1,015

1,300

China

1,200

1,200

756

788 806

875

1,933

2,531

3,467

3,437

3,931

4,000

4,000

Others

801

751

803

936

1,027

950 969

950

967

1,058 1,171 1,340 1,300

Total

17,636 17,015 20,706 18,256 22,467 18,640 22,271 20,536 22,829 26,186 26,044 27,703 29,400

From Todd, p. 395. Probably the most accurate cotton statistics

published. But see note on page 339.

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In 1909 Sir Charles Macara, who compiled the above table, addressed the President of the British Board of Trade as follows:

"Lancashire, the center of the cotton industry of England, has during the last 50 years doubled her population; she has also doubled her cotton machinery, considerably improved its efficiency, and increased the speed at which it is run, with the result that not only is there a proportionately greater output, but the output is of immensely increased value. The importance of the cotton industry of England may be judged from the fact that its products, in addition to providing for our home requirements, represent about a third of our total exports of manufactures.-These exports go to the great neutral markets, as well as largely to the countries which have a cotton industry of their own, forming part of their exports. In round figures, the cotton crop of the world now averages about 20,000,000 bales, and a common fallacy is to gauge the value of the cotton industry by the weight of raw cotton consumed. England, with considerably over one-third of the spindles of the world, consumes annually 4,000,000 bales of cotton, whereas

10 As of March 1, 1913. Sir Chas. Macara, as cited, p. 9.

the United States of America, with about half the number of spindles there are in England, consumes 5,000,000 bales, and Germany, with considerably less than a fifth of the spindles in England, consumes 134 million bales. The value of the cotton trade of the respective countries can really only be gauged by the extent of the machinery, the labor employed, the fineness, variety, excellence, and value of the fabrics produced." 11

See also figures in Chapters 70, 71, 72.

11 Cited by Porter, p. 312.

APPENDIX G

AUTHORITIES

BOOK I

FROM INDIA TO ENGLAND

BAINES, EDWARD, JR.-History of the Cotton Manufacture: London, 1835.

BALLS, W. L.-The Cotton Plant in Egypt: London, 1912. CHISHOLM, G. G.-Handbook of Commercial Geography: London, 1904.

DANA, W. B.-Cotton from Seed to Loom: New York, 1878.

DARWIN, ERASMUS.-The Botanic Garden, Part I: The Economy of Vegetation: London, 1791; Part II: The Loves of the Plants: London, 1790.

DRAPER, J. W.-A History of the Intellectual Development of Europe: New York, 1863.

DYER, JOHN.-The Fleece: London, 1757.

FERRERO, G.-Characters and Events of Roman History; Translation: New York, 1909.

HALLAM, H.-View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages: New York, 1896.

HALLIWELL, J. O. (editor)-The Voiage & Travaile of Sir

John Maundevile, Kt. Reprinted from the edition of 1725: London, 1883.

HERODOTUS.-Historia; Edited by Dietsch: Leipzig, 1899. KING, HENRY (translator)-The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidius Naso: Edinburgh, 1871.

LARNED, J. N. (compiler)-History for Ready Reference and Topical Reading: Springfield, Mass., 1895, 1901, 1910.

LEE, HENRY.-The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary: London,

1887.

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