Puslapio vaizdai
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Published by James Fraser 215, Regent Street, London.

OR,

HEADS AND TALES,

FOR THE WISE AND WAGGISH;

TO WHICH ARE ADDED,

POETICAL SELECTIONS.

BY THE LATE

PAUL CHATFIELD, M.D.

EDITED BY

JEFFERSON SAUNDERS, Esq.

"Misce stultitiam consiliis brevem."-HORACE.

IN TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR WHITTAKER & Co.

AVE MARIA LANE.

C. WYMAN, Printer, Chichester Place, London.

THE

TIN TRUMPET;

OR,

HEADS AND TALES.

LAMPS.-When these were brought in at night, the ancient Greeks used to salute them with the words, Xaupe, pidov pws-Salve amica lux!-The human owls of modern times, when the intellectual light is spreading around them, are so far from hailing it with a blessing, that they retire to their cells and lurking places, and hoot at it as a pestilent innovation. While stabbing at the liberties and happiness of mankind, they would rather cry out, with Macbeth,—

"Come, thick night,

And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell,

That my keen knife see not the wound it makes,
Nor Heaven peep through the blanket of the dark,
To cry hold! hold!"

LANDSCAPE GARDENING-Artificial nature: the finest of the fine arts. He who lays out

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grounds and gardens, calling new beauties into existence, not only for his own gratification, but for that of his contemporaries and successors, is exercising a benevolent power which makes him a species of creator. Like all the pure and simple pleasures, this is an enjoyment which rewards itself, and retains its attraction under all circumstances, and at every period of life. The word Paradise is synonymous with garden, and the Elysium of the ancients consisted of sylvan fields. Happy the man who can secure a living apotheosis, amid the beatitudes of a terrestrial garden!

LANGUAGES-in several instances have derived their names from a single word. Sismondi writing on the literature of the Trouveres, says, "The Provençal was called the Langue d'Oc, and the Wallon the Langue d'Oil, or d'Oui, from the affirmative word of each language, as the Italian was then called the Langue de Si, and the German the Langue de Ya." Not only to a whole language, but to a whole life may the word yes give its colour and character, as many an unhappy wife has found to

her cost.

Language, which is the uniting bond and the very medium of communion between men, is at the same time by the great variety of tongues, the means of severing and estranging nations more than any thing

H

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