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But the first hawser was barely clear when a boy in the uniform of a messenger rushed wildly through the entrance of the Deutschland's pier, waving a yellow envelop over his head, and shouting at the top of his lungs:

"Telegram for Cap'n Koenig! Telegram for Cap'n Koenig!"

On reaching the submarine, one of the men on the dock extended his hand for the message, but the boy sidestepped him.

"Are youse Cap'n Koenig?"

"No; but I'll sign it."

"Oh, I guess not! An' me lose me job? Nobody signs for dis but de guy it 's for, see!"

And nothing would change him. Nor would he surrender the telegram until his "book" had been passed with some difficulty over the widening stretch of water to the Deutschland, signed by Koenig, and safely returned to him; after which he promptly disappeared. Koenig ripped off the yellow envelop and attempted to read the message by the light from the "Baby's Own" sign. No sooner had he accomplished the first few words of the illegible scrawl than the light annoyingly flashed off. Turning so as to catch the comparatively feeble gleams from the pier, his eyes had barely accustomed themselves to the change when the sign flashed into life with blinding brilliance. Twice more he repeated this cycle, Wilson meantime standing grim-faced in the Judith's cabin, the sign-controller beneath his hand, watching with evident relish the working out of his plans. Not until a lantern was brought did Koenig succeed in reading this message:

Washington, D. C., November 21, 1916.

Captain Paul Koenig, Submarine Deutschland,

New London, Conn.

I offer you the most heartfelt wishes of all America for a safe and speedy homeward voyage. We of this nation stand always ready to welcome to our shores men in whose hands difficult tasks reach a successful culmination, and I assure you on behalf of the people that we regard the trans-oceanic voyages of the Deutschland not only as enviable national achivements,

but also as conclusive evidence of your sterling personal worth. Auf Wiedersehen.

WILSON.

Koenig, bursting with pride, quite naturally, read the message to his friends on the pier. Thus six full minutes elapsed before the departure of the Deutschland was resumed, whereas only three had been counted upon. Wilson possessed another card had it been needed: he would have asked Koenig to repeat the message to the tug, and the slow transcription, combined with occasional skilful misunderstandings, would have secured several minutes more. Koenig would have been less than human had he refused the chance of publishing such a message to the world. But the extra time was unnecessary. Less than the estimated three minutes had elapsed when Roy, his ear glued to the receiver, cried out:

"He's through! He 's through! He 's on his way back!"

At which Wilson, for reasons best known to himself, turned away so that the boy might not see his face. As the Deutschland passed out not far from the Judith's bow, Wilson reached up and opened the siren wide. When the ear-splitting shriek died down, Koenig, his arms waving, cursed him through the megaphone.

"Thou fool and blockhead! Do I want the entire world to know that I am going?"

Whereupon Wilson apologized most humbly. He was sorry, but he had n't understood it that way. To him it was an event to be celebrated and published broadcast; but since Koenig did not wish it, he would not offend again. And all was happy, and a little extra time was gained to assist Everett in getting back.

Even while they talked, a thing resembling a giant octopus was hauled up through the Judith's dumb-waiter shaft. Roy fed it a stiff dose of neat brandy when the helmet was removed, thrust its benumbed, bloodless hands into a bucket of steaming water, and, so far as he could, wiped the face free of the muddy water which covered it. "I suppose I'd do that again," gasped

the lieutenant when he was able to talk, "but I hope I never have to. By gad! I thought I was gone once. The suck of the screw turned me right upside down!"

As he spoke, the Judith slipped her moorings, and followed the Deutschland's wake, rapidly disappearing from the circle of light cast by an electric sign, which stupidly, to the Teutonic mind, advocated some kind of baby soap.

Once clear of the shelter of the pierends, a cold, raw wind struck the Judith. The night was as black as could be wished, the few stars seeming only to accentuate the inky darkness. Straight ahead, carrying regulation lights, ran the Deutschland, bearing for the open Behind followed the Judith, keeping her well within vision.

sea.

When the two approached the threemile limit there was not another vessel within sight. Apparently the time of departure had been well guarded; but Koenig, unwilling to run the slightest risk, intended to submerge at this point, anyway. If specific reason were needed, there was that verdammte tugboat. No telling what that crazy fool might be up to next.

One by one the lights were taken in, the masts lowered, and the other equipment of open running in friendly waters made secure for under-sea work. Gradually the boat slowed to less than two knots, and then, slowly and ponderously like some great fish, disappeared beneath the surface.

Instantly the whole character of the Judith changed. The advertising banner came fluttering down, and in its place was rushed up the antenna of a wireless outfit. Roy took less than five minutes to raise the Amphion.

"Tell them we 're coming!" cried Wil"Tell them we left the dock at quarter past six!"

son.

"There's no code for that."

"Oh, damn the code! Talk English; nothing can reach those Huns now."

So Roy talked, if the stilted, hiccoughing abbreviation of International Morse can be so termed, and the Amphion answered:

she knew where she was going. Considering her mission, no one seemed much concerned over the disappearance of the Deutschland. In fact, though a sharp watch was kept ahead, Wilson and Everett paid far more attention to the southwest, from which direction the cruiser was expected.

From time to time Everett read the patent log, and reported to the Amphion the distance covered and the exact heading of the tug.

An hour elapsed of such running, and then came the message:

"What lights are you carrying?" Roy informed them.

order:

"Good work; we 're coming."

Thereafter the Judith kept steaming ahead, slowly, it is true, but quite as if

Then came the

"Blink your aft range-light every ten seconds."

Five minutes elapsed.

"All right; we see you," came the word.

"Blest if we can see you!" answered Roy. "What lights are you carrying?" "None," said the cruiser, laconically. A long, gray shape, carrying two ten-inch rifles forward and an equally vicious pair aft, quietly oozed out of the blackness and fell in beside the Judith. One moment there was nothing there, then a mere ghostly shadow, and then, in a breath, she became too terribly real to leave any doubt of her identity. Swiftly the tug slipped over against the cruiser's side and made fast. Quickly the war-ship's crane lifted clear the entire roof of the forward deck-house, and thereafter, steaming along in the dark at perhaps six knots, they performed the delicate task of a transshipment at sea.

When the work was finished, Everett clambered down from the cruiser's deck for a final word with the man who had placed success almost within his reach. Wilson had already announced his intention of going back with the tug, and now Everett pleaded with him to change his mind. Little did he realize the fullness of the passion which lay behind the American's activities.

Wilson finally stopped him with a gesture.

"No," he said in a tired, strained voice, "I 've thought it all out, and I 'm going home. One thing, though, breaks me clean up-I 've got the finest

newspaper story of the year, an absolute scoop, and I just don't dare use it. You don't know what that means to me; but take my word for it. No, there's no use my going; there's nothing I can do; and besides, "-here he smiled grimly,-"having committed our crime, it's rather up to me to go back and destroy the evidence. If I stayed, I'd only make trouble. When you got those Huns on board, I'd kill some of the damned beasts with my bare hands!"

With more light, Everett must have seen that the man before him was fighting hard to retain his self-control. The voice gave but little evidence of the struggle which raged within.

"No! no! I want no thanks," he stumbled on. "You-you finish the job; that 's all I ask. No! no! I did n't do it for you, I did n't do it for you or for England; I did it for myself-for myself-for my own reasons-Oh, my God! for my own-damned—good—reasons!" And turning suddenly, he reeled into the Judith's cabin, leaving the Englishman staring.

In five minutes the tug had cast off and was steaming back toward the land.

KOENIG'S plan was to cross the routes of the transatlantic steamers as quickly as possible, and then get well away from them. Once free from the risk of frequent meetings, he figured he could turn eastward and run on the surface virtually day and night, and thus, making haste to suit himself, win across the ocean with convenience and safety. On the other hand, should he, in his passage across the rarely traversed portions of the sea, encounter ships not free from suspicion or ships which came too close, he was possessed of most adequate means for handling the situation: he need only take in his camouflage deck-house and smoke-stack, close his hatches, and disappear utterly from the knowledge of the world. But Koenig had little fear of these casual ships; the experience of three other voyages had shown that surface vessels paid no heed, or, detecting his submersible character and not knowing his peaceable intentions, avoided him like the plague.

"Oho!" he had boasted, "they are not afraid of us, oh, no! I have only to show myself, and they run like frightened curs!"

Of course there was a limit to the Deutschland's act of disappearance. She could go down, it is true, but, like any other submarine, the mileage traveled under water without recharging batteries was strictly limited, and the re-charging process required many hours, and could be done only upon the surface. The chief factor controlling the under-water mileage is the speed at which the submarine is driven. At the very maximum of, say, ten knots, the batteries will be dead in less than an hour; normal speed of six or seven knots can be held for perhaps eight hours; while a loaf-along three knots will permit of at least a full day's operation. Ten miles, fifty miles, eighty miles, are roughly the greatest ranges at these respective speeds, and the figures are significant. They mean that the faster she goes, the less the distance which a submarine can cover.

Provided the water is not too deep, submarines can descend and lie "doggo" upon the bottom, thus conserving the energy in the batteries; but in depths too great to permit of this, they must keep running at sufficient speed to render their horizontal rudders effective, otherwise they lose control of themselves. Hence, in deep water, with batteries almost dead, the submarine must choose between two things: she can come to the surface or she can go down, down, down, until the terrific pressure crushes her like an empty egg-shell. There is no other course.

The air which must be breathed by the crew rapidly becomes a factor limiting the period of submergence. Air is used again and again, being passed through chemical purifiers which remove the carbonic acid gas and being revitalized by the addition of pure oxygen carried under pressure in tanks; but a point is eventually reached where, unless a submarine comes to the surface, her crew must die the most terrible of all deaths-slow suffocation. Even an hour's run beneath the surface will so foul and taint the air that to a landsman it would be unbreathable;

[graphic]

"But the periscope was scarcely up before its delicate lenses and prisms were shattered into a thousand pieces"

twenty-four hours brings about a situation which is extremely critical; additional submergence means

The figures on submarine performance are those supplied to Lieutenant Everett by the Admiralty as being applicable to the Deutschland. Naturally they are meager, since Germany did not furnish detailed specifications to her enemies, and some of them were the result of surmise rather than of positive knowledge. However, they answered Wilson's purpose, and the calculations based on them were later found to be free from material error. In the under-sea boats built later than the Deutschland and intended for belligerent purposes,—that is, where machinery and equipment have not been sacrificed to give cargo space, all the figures have of course been very greatly improved upon.

On approaching the three-mile limit the Deutschland had submerged. Slowly she had run down a long sloping course until almost eighty feet below the surface, then straightened out and continued at that depth, heading approximately southeast. Thus she ran steadily for a number of hours.

When Koenig felt reasonably sure of safety, he reduced speed to mere steerageway, and cautiously approached the surface. As the periscope came out through the water, it showed a calm, but absolutely black, night, even the few stars visible in the earlier evening being completely clouded over. There was a suspicion of fog, though not enough to interfere with navigation. So far as he could see, the ocean appeared quite empty, and Koenig, smiling the smile of the superior German, congratulated himself for having passed through any cordon which had been set for him.

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"Pigs!" he sneered. "They have not brains to catch a broken play-boat!"

He then emerged completely, and brought the Deutschland to a stop. The conning-tower hatch was thrown open, and, welcoming the chance, the crew quickly clambered out on deck for a breath of air. There is something so demoralizing about a submarine that the men long for the outer world as soon as the hatch is closed.

The Deutschland lay motionless upon the surface for perhaps ten minutes, during which Koenig cursed the blackness and the mist.

newspaper story of the year, an absolute scoop, and I just don't dare use it. You don't know what that means to me; but take my word for it. No, there's no use my going; there's nothing I can do; and besides, "-here he smiled grimly,-"having committed our crime, it's rather up to me to go back and destroy the evidence. If I stayed, I'd only make trouble. When you got those Huns on board, I'd kill some of the damned beasts with my bare hands!"

With more light, Everett must have seen that the man before him was fighting hard to retain his self-control. The voice gave but little evidence of the struggle which raged within.

"No! no! I want no thanks," he stumbled on. "You-you finish the job; that 's all I ask. No! no! I did n't do it for you, I did n't do it for you or for England; I did it for myself-for myself-for my own reasons-Oh, my God! for my own-damned-good-reasons!" And turning suddenly, he reeled into the Judith's cabin, leaving the Englishman staring.

In five minutes the tug had cast off and was steaming back toward the land.

KOENIG'S plan was to cross the routes of the transatlantic steamers as quickly as possible, and then get well away from them. Once free from the risk of frequent meetings, he figured he could turn eastward and run on the surface virtually day and night, and thus, making haste to suit himself, win across the ocean with convenience and safety. On the other hand, should he, in his passage across the rarely traversed portions of the sea, encounter ships not free from suspicion or ships which came too close, he was possessed of most adequate means for handling the situation: he need only take in his camouflage deck-house and smoke-stack, close his hatches, and disappear utterly from the knowledge of the world. But Koenig had little fear of these casual shir the experience of three other voy had shown that surface vessels no heed, or, detecting his sub character and not knowing able intentions, avoided hi plague.

"Oho!" he had boasted, "they are not afraid of us, oh, no! I have only to show myself, and they run like frightened curs!"

Of course there was a limit to the Deutschland's act of disappearance. She could go down, it is true, but, like any other submarine, the mileage traveled under water without recharging batteries was strictly limited, and the re-charging process required many hours, and could be done only upon the surface. The chief factor controlling the under-water mileage is the speed at which the submarine is driven. At the very maximum of, say, ten knots, the batteries will be dead in less than an hour; normal speed of six or seven knots can be held for perhaps eight hours; while a loaf-along three knots will permit of at least a full day's operation. Ten miles, fifty miles, eighty miles, are roughly the greatest ranges at these respective speeds, and the figures are significant. They mean that the faster she goes, the less the distance which a submarine can cover.

Provided the water is not too deep, submarines can descend and lie "doggo" upon the bottom, thus conserving the energy in the batteries; but in depths too great to permit of this, they must keep running at sufficient speed to render their horizontal rudders effective, otherwise they lose control of themselves. Hence, in deep water, with batteries almost dead, the submarine must choose between two things: she can come to the surface or she can go down down, down, until the terrific press crushes her ike an empty eggThere is r The ai

cher course.

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