Seeing Europe with Famous Authors: Volum

Priekinis viršelis
Cosimo, Inc., 2006-04-01 - 200 psl.
It was our fortune to come into Greece by night, with a splendid moon shining upon the summer sea. The varied outlines of Sunium, on the one side, and gina on the other, were very clear, but in the deep shadows there was mystery enough to feed the burning impatience of seeing all in the light of common day... -from "On Arriving in Athens," by J.P. Mahaffy From the era from a trip to the Continent was rarer but more deeply appreciated comes an enchanting literary travelogue assembled from the hearts and minds of some of the greatest wordsmiths in the English language. A Grand Tour in 10 volumes, these delightful volumes, first published in 1914, gather little-seen essays from famous erudite explorers in compact collections that will inspire those who've never been abroad to make the journey, and move those who have to pack their bags again. Volume VIII continues the series' exploration of Italy, Sicily, and Greece, viewed through the eyes and prose of a panoply of extraordinary writers: Charles Dickens discovers Genoa, Augustus J.C. Hare braves the tomb of Virgil, Percy Bysshe Shelley journeys to Pompeii, and much more by such notable voices as Nathaniel Hawthorne, William Cullen Bryant, Theophile Gautier, and others. Beautifully illustrated with charming photographs, it is a work to treasure... and to take along on your next trip. OF INTEREST TO: armchair travelers, readers of classic literature American journalist and historian FRANCIS WHITING HALSEY (1851-1919) was literary editor of The New York Times from 1892 through 1896. He wrote and lectured extensively on history, and also edited the two-volume Great Epochs in American History Described by Famous Writers, From Columbus to Roosevelt (1912).

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Turinys

THE MAINLAND OF GREECE
112
A WINTER IN ATHENS HALF A CENTURY
119
THE ELGIN MARBLESBy J P Mahaffy
127
WHERE ST PAUL PREACHEDBy J P Mahaffy
134
CORINTHBy J P Mahaffy
140
THE TEMPLE OF ZEUS AT OLYMPIA AS IT
146
THERMOPYLAEBy Rufus B Richardson
152
SPARTA AND MAINABy Bayard Taylor
160

FERRARABy Theophile Gautier
59
LAKE COMоBy Percy Bysshe Shelley
64
SICILIAN SCENES
91
SEGESTEBy Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
97
MOUNT TNABy Will S Monroe
104
TIRYNS AND MYCENAEBy J P Mahaffy
169
THE GREEK ISLANDS
175
CORFUBy Edward A Freeman
182
MT ATHOSBy Charles Dudley Warner
189
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50 psl. - This scene was what the Greeks beheld (Pompeii, you know, was a Greek city). They lived in harmony with nature ; and the interstices of their incomparable columns were portals, as it were, to admit the spirit of beauty which animates this glorious universe to visit those whom it inspired.
52 psl. - I now understand why the Greeks were such great poets: and, above all, I can account, it seems to me, for the harmony, the unity, the perfection, the uniform excellence, of all their works of art. They lived in a perpetual commerce with external nature, and nourished themselves upon the spirit of its forms.
66 psl. - This shore of the lake is one continued village, and the Milanese nobility have their villas here. The union of culture and the untameable profusion and loveliness of nature is here so close that the line where they are divided can hardly be discovered. But the finest scenery is that of the Villa Pliniana, so called from a fountain which ebbs and flows every three hours, described by the younger Pliny, which is in the courtyard.
67 psl. - Pliniana ; so called from a fountain which ebbs and flows every three hours, described by the younger Pliny, which is in the courtyard. This house, which was once a magnificent palace, and is now half in ruins, we are endeavouring to procure.
71 psl. - His reputation quickly peopled it, and gave rise to the republic which calls itself after his name : so that the commonwealth of Marino may boast at least of a nobler original than that of Rome, the one having been at first an asylum for robbers and murderers, and the other a resort of persons eminent for their piety and devotion.
50 psl. - Prochyta, and Misenum. Behind was the single summit of Vesuvius, rolling forth volumes of thick white smoke, whose foam-like column was sometimes darted into the clear dark sky, and fell in little streaks along the wind. Between Vesuvius and the nearer mountains, as through a chasm, was seen the main line of the loftiest Apennines to the east. The day was radiant and warm. Every now and then we heard subterranean thunder of Vesuvius ; its distant deep peals seemed to shake the very air and light...
124 psl. - ... to mention this savage act. And there is a small stone such as a little man can sit on, on which they say Silenus rested, when Dionysus came to the land. Silenus is the name they give to all old Satyrs. About the Satyrs I have conversed with many, wishing to know all about them. And Euphemus, a Carian, told me that sailing once on a time to Italy he was driven out of his course by the winds, and carried to a distant sea, where people no longer sail. And he said that here were many desert islands,...
52 psl. - ... me, for the harmony, the unity, the perfection, the uniform excellence, of all their works of art. They lived in a perpetual commerce with external nature, and nourished themselves upon the spirit of its forms. Their theatres were all open to the mountains and the sky. Their columns, the ideal types of a sacred forest, with its roof of interwoven tracery, admitted the light and wind ; the odour and the freshness of the country penetrated the cities.
48 psl. - Pompeians could contemplate the clouds and the lamps of heaven ; could see the moon rise high behind Vesuvius, and the sun set in the sea, tremulous with an atmosphere of golden vapour, between Inarime and Misenum.

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