American Tariffs from Plymouth Rock to McKinley: A Complete and Impartial History of Our Tariff Systems, 1620-1891

Priekinis viršelis
American Protective Tariff League, 1892 - 96 psl.
0 Apžvalgos
Atsiliepimai nepatvirtinti, bet „Google“ ieško netikro turinio ir jį šalina, jei jis aptinkamas
 

Ką žmonės sako - Rašyti recenziją

Neradome recenzijų įprastose vietose.

Pasirinkti puslapiai

Kiti leidimai - Peržiūrėti viską

Pagrindiniai terminai ir frazės

Populiarios ištraukos

26 psl. - In short, sir, we have been too long subject to the policy of British merchants. It is time that we should become a little more Americanized; and instead of feeding the paupers and laborers of England feed our own, or else in a short time by continuing our present policy we shall all be rendered paupers ourselves.
61 psl. - it is better not to know so many things than to know so many things that ain't so.
18 psl. - Whereas, it is necessary for the support of the Government, for the discharge of the debts of the United States, and the encouragement and protection of manufactures, that duties be laid on goods, wares, and merchandise imported.
20 psl. - ... to be independent for the comforts of life we must fabricate them ourselves. We must now place the manufacturer by the side of the agriculturist.
76 psl. - Europe as fast as they could arrive within the territory, and still by a system of taxation so indirect as not to be perceived, much less felt. Because it is my deliberate judgment that the prosperity of America is mainly due to its system of protective laws, I urge that Germany has now reached that point...
69 psl. - January, eighteen hundred and ninety-two, whenever, and so often as the President shall be satisfied that the government of any country producing and exporting sugars, molasses, coffee, tea, and hides,, raw and uncured, or any of such articles, imposes duties or other exactions upon the agricultural or other products of the United States, which in view of the free introduction of such sugar, molasses, coffee, tea, and hides into the United States he may deem to be reciprocally unequal and unreasonable...
69 psl. - ... imposes duties or other exactions upon the agricultural or other products of the United States, which in view of the free introduction of such sugar, molasses, coffee, tea, and hides into the United States he may deem to be reciprocally unequal and unreasonable...
30 psl. - General good health has prevailed, abundance has crowned the toil of the husbandman, and labor in all its branches is receiving an ample reward, while education, science, and the arts are rapidly enlarging the means of social happiness. The progress of our country in her career of greatness, not only in the vast extension of our territorial limits and the rapid increase of our population, but in resources and wealth and in the happy condition of our people, is without an example in the history of...
71 psl. - Commerce is not a gambling among nations for a stake, to be won by some and lost by others. It has not the tendency necessarily to impoverish one of the parties to it, while it enriches the other; all parties gain, all parties make profits, all parties grow rich, by the operations of just and liberal commerce.
23 psl. - Americans will pay, which the exhausted state of the continent renders very unlikely ; and because it was well worth while to incur a loss upon the first exportation, in order, by the glut, to stifle in the cradle those rising manufactures in the United States, which the war had forced into existence contrary to the natural course of things.

Bibliografinė informacija