Memorials of Shakspeare: Or, Sketches of His Character and Genius

Priekinis viršelis
H. Colburn, 1828 - 494 psl.
0 Apžvalgos
Atsiliepimai nepatvirtinti, bet „Google“ ieško netikro turinio ir jį šalina, jei jis aptinkamas

Knygos viduje

Ką žmonės sako - Rašyti recenziją

Neradome recenzijų įprastose vietose.

Kiti leidimai - Peržiūrėti viską

Pagrindiniai terminai ir frazės

Populiarios ištraukos

468 psl. - He was the man who of all modern, and perhaps ancient poets, had the largest and most comprehensive soul. All the images of nature were still present to him, and he drew them not laboriously, but luckily : when he describes anything, you more than see it, you feel it too.
406 psl. - I am thane of Cawdor : If good, why do I yield to that suggestion Whose horrid image doth unfix my hair, And make my seated heart knock at my ribs, • Against the use of nature...
300 psl. - You taught me language; and my profit on't Is, I know how to curse : The red plague rid you, For learning me your language ! Pro.
181 psl. - From his cradle, He was a scholar, and a ripe, and good one; Exceeding wise, fair spoken, and persuading : Lofty, and sour, to them that lov'd him not; But, to those men that sought him, sweet as summer.
187 psl. - How absolute the knave is ! we must speak by the card, or equivocation will undo us. By the Lord, Horatio, these three years I have taken note of it ; the age is grown so picked that the toe of the peasant comes so near the heel of the courtier, he galls his kibe. — How long hast thou been a grave-maker? 1 Clo. Of all the days i' the year, I came to't that day that our last King Hamlet o'ercame Fortinbras.
315 psl. - Stain my man's cheeks! No, you unnatural hags, I will have such revenges on you both That all the world shall— I will do such things.— What they are yet I know not,— but they shall be The terrors of the earth. You...
302 psl. - Were I in England now, as once I was, and had but this fish painted, not a holiday fool there but would give a piece of silver. There would this monster make a man. Any strange beast there makes a man. When they will not give a doit to relieve a lame beggar, they will lay out ten to see a dead Indian.
169 psl. - This guest of summer, The temple-haunting martlet, does approve By his loved mansionry that the heaven's breath Smells wooingly here : no jutty, frieze, Buttress, nor coign of vantage, but this bird Hath made his pendent bed and procreant cradle : Where they most breed and haunt, I have observed The air is delicate.
348 psl. - To be suspected ; fram'd to make women false. The Moor is of a free and open nature. That thinks men honest that but seem to be so ; And will as tenderly be led by the nose As asses are. I have't ; — it is engender'd : — hell and night Must bring this monstrous birth to the world's light.
211 psl. - What need'st thou such weak witness of thy name ? Thou in our wonder and astonishment Hast built thyself a live-long monument. For whilst to th...

Bibliografinė informacija