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nothing to do but grin and bear it. Happily | A large brewing firm has bit upon quite a novel we then reached Rugby Junction, and I was and picturesque form of advertisement. Hangable to get out and promenade the platform for ing in front of their customers' public-houses half an hour, whilst our train was shunted off are large barrels, painted many colours, and somewhere to allow the express to pass. Next with gas-jets inside. As there are dozens of time I got into a smoking carraige. My com- these barrels on each side of all the principal panions were three fishermen, laden with the streets, the effect at night-time is quite Oriental, spoils of the briny. They told me they made and gives the town the appearance of a gigantic the journey two or three times a week; but as Cremorne, specially illuminated for the proprietheir business was merely to hawk fish about tor's benefit. the streets of Liverpool, how they made it pay After dinner I read the local papers, and seemed to me a mystery. We stop in the midst made myself acquainted with what was "going of a large station, full of life and bustle, and I on” in the town. Then I wandered out, across get occasional glimpses of Birmingham: we the stone-paved Square, past Saint George's tear through the Black Country, where the fur- Hall, and into Whitechapel--not to be compared naces, glowing in the darkness, look like so with our Eastern High-street, but more like the many earthly pandemoniums; we halt for a few Haymarket-cafés here, cafés there, and cafés minutes at Wolverhampton; and at last, when everywhere. Where there are not cafés there it seems as if I had been at least three days are public-houses. The cafés are of two sorts. sitting in a railway-carriage, we reach our The better sort are showy-looking places with journey's end, and I find myself on the platform plenty of looking-glasses and gilding, and reof the Lime-street Station, Liverpool.

freshment served in a style that even Spiers and People in want of a new sensation should | Pond could not improve upon. Here meet the enter a large city, long after dark, being perfectly fast young men of the town. Liverpood, it unacquainted with the place, and having no must le remembered, has no aristocracy; and particular destination. Such was my case. the yesterday nobodies, to-day large merchants, Happily on quitting the Lime-street Station you are the principal men of the place. They work find yourself in the very centre of the town, in hard, make money fast, and spend it faster; for what I may call the Trafalgar Square of Liver- there is much of the American element about pool. Opposite, across an immense stone-paved them. To see well-dressed young gentlemen square, is St. George's Hall, one of the finest going Tommy Dodd for bottles of champagne buildings in England. To the right and left may not be a very intellectual sight, but that is are several wide, well-lighted streets ; so that, what I saw. The lower cafés were much more having studied the map, I understood where I amusing, if less refined. Generally kept by was at once. To find an hotel was an easy Germans, there was a certain order and respecthing in a city which is always full of travellers; tability about them, which, alas! we only expect and I was not sorry to find myself seated in a to see in foreign places of amusement. With well-furnished coffee-room, which looked im- I real Frauleins bebind the bar, drawing the ale mensely cheerful after sitting all day in the l of Vienna or the beer of Bavaria ; with Lüdtrain. If good cooking, moderate charges, and i wig or Johann politely attending upon the cusquick attendance are necessary to dining, then i tomers; and with a quadrille-band playing the the Liverpool hotels are model houses of enter- dreamy waltzes of Strauss and Gung’l, it wanted tainment; and here I must mention something, very little imagination to fancy ourselves in trifling in itself, but still one of the "customs of Fatherland. The café chantant is chiefly fre. the country.” At one end of the coffee-room quented by sailors; and the specimens I saw was a glass-door, leading to a smaller apartment. were very different from the conventional Jacks -on that door was painted “Smoke Room.' ashore. 'Quiet, sober men, silently playing at The same expressian was vsed all over Liver- cards or dominoes, smoking cigars, and sipping pool. In London we say smoking-room; but lemonade, were certainly an improvement upon in Wales that particular chamber is called "The the rackety Jacks which Nelson commanded Smoky.". The beer-language of the North is and Captain Marryat immortalized. There were rather apt to confuse a Southerner. Stout is an also cafés dansante, where Bill Bowling and unknown word; neither have they London porter Ben Bunting danced polkas and redowas (sailors at twopence a pint, their only black beer being only dance hornpipes on the stage now) with porter at twopence a glass, equal, if not superior Poli and Sue; but as those young ladies would to our best stout, and with a “cauliflower” on just as soon bite off Jack's ear as mix his grog, the top, such as is seldom seen except in those and were more likely to pawn his clothes than wonderful paintings of bread, cheese, and beer mend them, the less said about them the better. generally hanging up in the parlour of a Kentish For it seems hard that Jack, whose only idea of country-inn. The Liverpool ale has a “head" "shore” is a place where he can be jolly, should with a slight strawberry Havour, and, though it become the prey of a set of tigresses, who only is generally threepence a glass, no one can leave him when his last penny is spent and his grumble at the extra penny; for on tasting it I last rag pawned; though until lately such was was able to imagine what the beverage was like bis certain fate; but now there is a Sailors' that Hebe handed round to the jolly Olympian Home in Liverpool, where Jack is well taken deities. Before quitting such a very low subject care of; and it is by no means an unusual as beer, I must relate one more circumstance,' thing for him to get out on a fresh voyage with

the greater part of his savings snugly lodged in / at bars as long as the publics remain open, and the bank.

then loiter lazily home to bed. Sitting in one of these cafés late at night, I At ray hotel everybody is up, though it is get a sermon on fast life far more telling than past one o'clock. The coffee-room :: full of many preached from a pulpit. It is furnished night birds, of course all staying in the house. like a drawing-room-Brussels carpet, elegant As I came to see Liverpool life, I join them. chairs and sofas, pictures, mirrors, and gaslight The room is decorated with real and artificial in abundance. There is no stage; but the lady flowers; and on the sideboards I see every and gentlemen professionals sing standing by variety of red and green Bohemian glass. There the piano. At a first glance everybody seems is soinething particularly luxurious about to be overflowing with happiness; but all is not coloured glass. In one respect the Livergold that glitters. Next to me is a comic-singer, pudlians show their sense, they smoke long clay in the approved evening-dress, looking the pic-pipes. In London this would be considered ture of misery. Whispering together across a low; but now that every office-boy and barber'stable are two would-be fast young men (ten clerk sports a cheap meerschaum, I cannot see years ago they would have been called boys), why it should be so. Tobacco tastes much who seem anything but “jolly” to-night. And nicer in a clay, especially a long one; and the not far off are a couple of " ladies," dressed a la Liverpool long clays were the best I ever met Mabile, one of whom is drinking unlimited hot with, nearly twice as long as those sold in whisky and water, and telling her troubles to London,and tipped with green sealing-wax. the other. The comic-singer makes me his Seeing so many gentlemen smoking long pipes, confidant. He has not been able to sing for gave the scene the appearance of one of three weeks-something the matter with his Hogarth's pictures. throat ; if he is not better by Saturılay, he will During my stay in Liverpool I made good lose his engagement. What will he do tben ? use of my tiine, and saw, I think, all that was Perbaps end his troubles (?) by throwing him- worth seeing in the great northern city. I had self into the Mersey. When the music grows

two enemies, who did all in their power to faint I hear what the “ boys” have to say. One prevent my getting about, the wind and the rain. has lost his situation-refused a character, owes It was not a wind that one couid hear indoors, money, and quarrelled with the "guvnor.” and

and take precautions against accordingly, The old story, betting and billiards. And yet neither was it a rain you could depend upon. hisсompanion, instead of taking the warning, only When I went out in the morning there was every boasts of his numerous acquaintances on the prospect of a fine day; but as soon as I found “turf” and amongst the “fancy.” Then their myself in an unsheltered spot, rude Boreas conversation is drowned in the chorus—such a commenced cracking bis cheeks, and Aquarius chorus!

emptied his watering-pot. Scotland-road is

about one of the longest roads up and down “I swore I'd follow her everywhere,

which I have wandered, beginning with large Every-everywhere where-r;

shops, such as we have in the Borough and LudShe'd cherry-red lips and pretty blue eyes, That girl with the golden hair.”

gate Hill (where the useful is more considered than the ornamental), and ending amongst the

squalid dens of the poor Irish. Poor Irish, The " lady' calls for more whisky- and-water indeed ! Whenever they manage to get a hot. O, I love it," she says, draining the quarter” at all it is sure to be in the lowest glass; “ I've spent three fortunes in drink, and and least healthy part of the town. Here boots, I'd spend three more if I had 'em.” She went shoes, and stockings, are evidently considered to the doctor that morning, -rapid consumption. unnecessary luxuries, men, women, and children; Her rent is due, and her landlord threatens. going about barefooted. In fact I never entered “ I have a little boy at home, such a sweet

a minor theatre or music-hall without seeing as little fellow! His father says he will take it many bare feet in the pit and gallery as I saw and bring him up like a gentleman if I promise boots. But considering the ills we suffer from never to want to see him again ; but when he corns and bunions, to say nothing of our feet puts his iittle arms round my neck, and kisses growing into different shapes from what nature me, I feel that I could do anything, anything intended, I think those people were rather to be sooner than part with him.”

envied than pitied. Scotland-road is one way And then they all sing about the “girl with to the docks; considered in Liverpool the eighth the golden hair.”

wonder of the world. Certainly such a number Well, if this is fast life, let me be the slowest of ships, from every country in the world, are of the slow.

never seen together in one place. In “ The streets are still crowded. A policeman summer-time” those docks must be a delightful tells me that the young men make a boast of | lounging place, the walk along the outer basin, never going to bed sober. At all events, they and the Mersey dashing against the walls, and get inebriated, as the English are supposed to the fine view up and down the river, being quite take their pleasures-very sadly. No Jolly romantic ; but as the wind seemed determined Dogs, no Rollicking Rams, such as disturb the to blow me over the unprotected edge whenever sleeping Londoners with their midnight I went near it, regard for personal safety overchoruses ; but gangs of quiet men, who stand came my love of the picturesque, and I was obliged to retreat into safer quarters. Close to the Drama ; either a handsome building lately the docks are the Custom-House and Exchange, erected by some enterprising capitalist, or else a right in the midst of the haunts of the Liverpool tumble-down house, famous for its ancient merchants, a name which gained such unenviable tradition. Many of our principal dramatic notoriety some nine years ago in consequence of authors prefer having their plays brought out a certain letter sent to the modern Cæsar. The in Liverpool, knowing that if they there gain a landing-stage is a very lively place, steamboats favourable reception, their success is certain departing and arriving every minute. Seeing everywhere else. Byron's " Lancashire Lass," so many different sorts of people continually Robertson's "Lady Clara Vere de Vere,” and passing to and fro in one place, reminded me of Gilbert's burlesque of "The Vivandiere," all à set scene in a grand opera at the “garden;" first saw the light of the Liverpool lamps. and I could almost imagine that Mr. Augustus During my visit, Italian Opera reigned at the Harris had been specially engaged to superintend | Alexandra, and Mr. Mapleson's "stars” were the grouping, and that Mr. W. H. Payne would nightly drawing crowded houses. At the suddenly appear as the principal citizen. Amphitheatre, Barry Sulllivan and Miss Kate

sweet

Once I was sold. Seeing a green space in Saville were doing the legitimate; and the way the map marked " Recreation Grounds," I that Shakspeare was appreciated gave a thought I would go there and recreate myself; good idea of the intellectual capabilities of the but I found only a small enclosed space, inhabitants. Perhaps the prettiest theatre in apparently without an entrance, entirely deserted, Liverpool is the Prince of Wales's, the Strand of and looking more like a “pound” than anything the North. Under the régime of Mr. Henderelse. Not far off is Everton, the realization of son, and afterwards of Mr. H. J. Byron (2 the Sweetstuff palace of the fairy tale; or native), this theatre became one of the best rat her a sweetstuff village, the inhabitants of known in the provinces; and its present which mostly, in some way or the other, get manager, Mr. Frank Musgrave (late musical their living by the manufacture and sale of the conductor of the Strand), seems determined to famous toffee. If I had only been a schoolboy, follow in their footsteps. With a burlesque with a shilling or two in my pocket, what a company, including Misses E. Johnstone, Jenny happy day I might have passed in Everton, and White, and Hughes (who does not recollect the what a week I should have had afterwards. latter with Robson at the Olympic !) the perform. Having reached the years of discretion (“not so ances could even be compared with those at our certain of that," I hear somebody say), I "did" New Royalty or Strand. The Adelphi theatre Everton in five minutes ; and then went in in Christian Street, went in for the sensational; search of fresh fields and,-but I fancy that but what amused me most was the Coliseum. expression has been used once too often. Certainly not an aristocratic audience, by no

The Botanical Gardens looked very pleasant, means a star company, but what melo-dramas ! even at a time of the year when the ground was I seemed to be in a theatre of the last century, covered with leaves, and the fair summer flowers The general appearance of this theatre reminded were sleeping their long sleep. I cannot say me of the old Effingham before it was turned much for the parks. At present they are only into the New East London. Smoking was in their infancy, and in no way to be compared allowed ; the audience fought and quarrelled with the “lungs" of London. And I was between the acts; and when the sensation scene surprised to find that, in a large place like came, everybody stood upon the seats. Here ! Liverpool, no one seemed to take advantage of saw, of course, a version of "After Dark," the breathing-grounds supplied to them by a express train and all; and here I saw (extremely

corporation at last sensible of the advantage of well played, too), a long-forgotten piece, “Sweeny open spaces in large towns. The heavy swells, Todd, the Barber of Fleet Street." the dainty daughters of fashion, the perambu- Liverpool is also well off in Music Halls, from lator-wheeling nursemaids, with their tall, the "Star" in Williamson-square' down to military attendants, the ragged children playing “penny gaffs" and free concert-rooms; but as at at "touch” amongst the trees, so familiar to most places well-known London performers were Londoners, had no representatives in Liverpool. engaged, who sang songs they had been singing I sat some time in one of the parks, and was months back in the metropolis, the entertainonly passed by an errand-boy and a postman, ments wanted the charm of novelty as far as I who only used the place as a short cut.

was concerned. But wherever I went, I always Theatrically speaking, Liverpool indeed can found crowded audiences, who perfectly under be proud. Such handsome and comfortable stood the rules of musie-hall etiquette, two of theatres, such actors and actresses, and such which seem to be : “ Always invite your neighcritical audiences, have their equal nowhere, bours to drink out of your glass;" and "Join in taking them all together. Liverpool is now the the chorus whether you know the words or not." recognised school of the drama. Andrew Liverpool is certainly literary, although the Halliday, who ought to know something about newspapers are not up to much; but there is a the stage, in an “All the Year Round” article, weekly comic journal, “The Porcupine," which called Liverpool a "Seat of Theatres ; and the combines the best features of " Punch," " Fun," author of " King o' Scots,” could not have and “The Tomahawk," and is perfectly original given it a better name. No matter where you notwithstanding. "The Porcupine" is a paper 80, you are sure to come across some Temple of to be read, not merely to be " looked at." I was

surprised to see no reviews, and a town like present Liverpool, especially young Liverpool, is Liverpool should certainly boast of at least one much too fast. Like all people who have monthly magazine ; for many men, famous suddenly become wealthy, the Liverpudlians play in the world of letters, hail from the city on the at ducks and drakes with their money, bargaining, Mersey, amongst whom was poor Robert speculating, buying and selling all day, and Brough, who gave us 80 many pictures of going in for unmistakeable “ high ginks" all Liverpool society.

night. Liverpool is nothing is not commercial; Liverpool is a great city, with a little of the and though commerce showers her favours thickly American element about it, and it is increasing on her favourites, if they neglect paying her both in size and population every day. Beyond sufficient homage, she has her revenge by conthe town are colonies of villas, large, handsome demning them to universal smash. houses, with coach-houses and stabling; and But literature, science, and art, are making further on, every available plot of ground appears gigantic strides ; and I think there is a brilliant to be given up to bricks and mortar-a sure future for the Second City in the Land. sign of increasing wealth and prosperity. But at

OUR PARIS CORRESPONDENT.

MY DEAR C,

king, who reigned over them during eight It is a bad state of things methinks, when the months with despotic sway, satisfying his indisposition of one man can spread alarm all passions and hanging, his subjects without over Europe, stagnate commerce, and make ceremony. All have heard of the singular everything depend on the daily bulletin of his adventures of the famous Theodore de Neuhoff, health. So it is when Napoleon III. passes an once lieutenant in the regiment de la March, agitated night or loses his appetite, or is unable belonging to the Duke of Orleans, and who at to show himself to the anxious Parisians. It last, possessing nothing in the world but may be very lattering to his Majesty's vanity, creditors in every kingdom in Europe, went to but I repeat, it is a bad state of things. There try his fortune in Corsica, at the moment that has been a complete panic for this last month in those hardy mountaineers were up in arms Paris, and so contradictory have the newspapers against Genoa. They greeted Theodore de and public rumours been as to the danger of the Neuhoff with enthusiasm and proclaimed him Dictators malady, that we have not known what king, and a regular king Stork he proved. At to believe. No doubt there has been great the end of eight months his Majesty perceiving exaggeration on both sides, as there ever is on that his popularity was gradually declinirg, and such occasions, particularly when it was known fearing his vindicative subjects, very wisely left that an additional physician had been called in, them privately, by escaping on board a fisher. and that the Emperor remained in bed, which, man's boat, to Leghorn, where he was immediateit seems, he readily does when indisposed. If ly accosted by a vigilant creditor. In vain he bis Majesty has had the twentieth part of the offered his kingdom in pawn; the place be. different diseases accorded him by bis affectionate came too warm for bim, and after many ups and subjects, his recovery is a perfect miracle, but downs, he at last managed to escape to London, as to say truly what be has been suffering from where he died. Horace Walpole gave him a I know not which to choose. However, he has tombstone, on wbich he had engraved: "Fortune been out several times in his carriage, has gained accorded him a kingdom and refused him his appetite and the Empress her usual serenity bread.” During the Emperor's illness the and spirits, and her projected oriental journey papers again took up the subject of who should is again become probable, although it had been succeed him in the event of death, and the entirely abandoned. Her visit to Corsica with “ Opinion Nationale” warmly sustained the the Prince Imperial was saddened with anxiety, Prince Napoleon's candidature, either. and was no doubt realized at that moment in Emperor or Regent, for evidently the Regency order to calm public disquietude. The Corsicans would conduct to sovereignty. The Prince is of course were overjoyed to welcome the august proud of his resemblance to Napoleon I, and no lady and her son to their island, the cradle of doubt counts on that and his talent, but he is the Napoleon race. The night they returned to not very pępular. He passes for being, afraid St. Cloud, the Emperor detained the young of risking his person before powder and shot ; prince by his bedside until past midnight, and, although he professes very liberal principles, listening to the child's account of his journey, he cannot forget that his mother was a German his observations and pleasure. Since it has princess of ancient race, and his wife an Italian been proposed to create his Imperial Highness princess-royal of no less pure blood. His late Duke of Corsica, others have asked for him to speech at the Senate was as usual very eloquent, be made king of Algiers. The Corsicans have and it so annoyed the late Prime Minister, Mr. never yet had a duke, but they have had one Rouber, that he bounded again in his presi

as

dential chair in thinking thas he was no longer Apropos of the quarrel you are having in minister, and could not answer the prince. England about Mrs. Beecher Stowe's assertion However, the famous Senatus-Consulte is voted, that she has found out the real ca use of Lord and it appears that a new era of liberty is about Byron's separation from his wife. The poet to gleam forth on France-responsible ministers was black enough without embellishment, and and a constitutional Emperor. Time will prove.methinks they might let him rest in peace in Report also says that in March, when the Prince his tomb. His once beautiful mistress, the Impertal will have attained his 14th year, the Countess Guiccioli, now the famous MarEmperor intends abdicating in his favour, chioness de Boissy, protests against what the reviving an old custom in the French royal American authoress says; and she affirms that annals, of declaring the heir to the throne of she has daily intercourse still with the noble age at 14. The young prince was said to have poet, and that before witnesses. Doctor Cérise, exclaimed at bis first communion, that as soon two years ago, assisted at one of these visits of as he was emperor, he would banish every other his Lordship's spirit. The lady addressed a religion from his dominions except Roman letter to the poet, then put a large sheet of catholicism. Strange principles to have incul- foolscap paper, such as Byron used to write on, cated into the young mind of a prince issue of before her, then she fell into a kind of transport, the Revolution !

raised her eyes to Heaven, and her band, holdThere has been great dissatisfaction amongst | ing a pen, ran over the paper after a few minutes, the liberal party about the way Ledru-Rollin is as if pushed by some unseen force, wholly withtreated by the amnesty, he alone being excepted out the lady's will, her eyes continually fixed on in the general pardon, and that under the plea i high. The letter announced, that day, that an that he was complicated in an attempt to American author was about writing a book on assassinate the Emperor. But the complicity bas his (Lord Byron's) life, full of horrible and false never been proved, and the Government certainly things. It does seern odd that Mrs. Beecher does Ledru-Rollin too much honour in render- Stowe should have made a discovery in the ing him so important a person. An exile always poet's life, after the researches of small hosts of creates sympathy.

enemies, that would have so sweetly gloried in The opening of the shooting season has adding another sin to the sinning nobleman's acemptied Paris of what remained of Parisians who count-and infamy, too! possess a piece of ground out of the capital, or We have just lost an aged publicist, who was even who have friends that can offer them a once the terror of all actors and actresses. field or wood to try their skill in. No man who Monsieur Charles Maurice died more than has the least claim to fashion or to be somebody, eighty years of age. He flourished when Mdlie. could pass through September without shoulder- | Georges and Talma excited the enthusiasm of ing his gun and waadering forth in quest of the Parisians, and was then editor of the partridges ; though I have seen many when Courrier des Théatres, and wo be to those who once in the country, and far from those who mounted the stage without subscribing to his know them, get behind a hay-stack, pick a paper. “The elephant Cunny plays to-night comfortable corner, pull out a cigar and at the Port St. Martin; Mulle. Georges also book, and leave the partridges in perfect makes her debut at the Odéon-curione coinci. security, to chirp about with their pretty little dence!" Malle. Georges was very stout and ones, as if September had yet to dawn.

had not subscribed to his Courrier. The next The sea-side season has not been very night : "Masons are employed ever since yesagreeable, so much wind and cold, and yet terday to prop up the theatre ; it shook when Trouville has again been full of company, many Malle. Georges entered.” The actress bit her attracted by the ex-Queen of Spain, who spent lips, but resisted. “Yesterday the king passed a month there with her family. Her mother, a review in the Champ de Mars, in the midst the Queen Christine, was at Havre, and during of torrid heat; the perspiration ran down the the daughter's sojourn at Trouville, she and her soldiers' faces. All at once a refreshing sensahusband went to Havre to pay their respects to tion passed over them, a shade darkened the Christine. They went by steamer, and the sun, it was Malle. Georges that passed, and her captain hoisted the Spanish flag in compliment shadow intercepted the burning rays.” The to their Majesties' presence, which courtesy lady was obliged to submit, and hostilities ruffled the Spanish Consul's temper, and he ceased. Talma, in all the lustre of his genius, was about, if he did not ask, an explana- was a more difficult foe; Maurice could find tion. The meeting of the two dethroned nothing to exercise his criticisms on; however, monarc's rather amused the French spectators, one day he wrote: “Talma is inimitable, the for as soon as Isabella and her husband landed, majesty of his gestures in particular is something Christine, who was on the pier waiting them, wonderful. He has three that are really remarkopened her arms to receive her son-in-law; he, able. The first consists in placing his hand on bis instead of running into them, fell down at her heart (No. 1); the second in stretching out his feet and gallantly kissed her hand. General arms before him (No. 2); the next in throwing Prim bas been in Paris, it was said that the his two arms before and in bringing them grace. Emperor would not give him audience ; how- fully on his bosom (No. 3).” Talma laughed, ever, his Majesty received the General at St. but did not take the Courrier. The Cloud, and had a long conversation with him. day Maurice wrotem" Talma was marvellous

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