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Under Stone & Webster Management

THE

HERE is never a time when a public utility can say that its plant is complete. There is never a time when the utility is not extending its lines or power plants or making some other additions to its service. When the public demands service, the utility must provide facilities for that service even though capital be scarce and the cost of money, labor and material high.

More, the progressive utility must anticipate the demand for service. It must be a pioneer.

STONE & WEBSTER, INC., is a pioneer in successfully
financing, building and operating public utilities.
Broader fields of usefulness are constantly being
opened; new territories are daily being developed. New
and more efficient methods are being tested and adopt-
ed. The business of giving the public better service
demands sound judgment and knowledge.

Behind every company under STONE & WEB.
STER management, are the engineering, financial
and executive resources of a national organization
whose reputation is built on 38 years of service.
Twenty-five thousand Stone & Webster men know
that the growth of a public utility company de
pends on its success in serving the public.

STONE & Webster

INCORPORATED

OPERATE

FINANCE

BUILD

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as Sunshine

for the winter home

New color effects, introduced by Lloyd,

bring warmth and cheer to the dreariest rooms. Decidedly inexpensive to create entrancing transformations.

Photograph of an interesting room corner in "1400 Lake Shore Drive" Chicago's most exclusive apartment building.

I to keep Summer indoors in HE new idea in home-making is

through the Winter. Living rooms that have the charm of formal gardens, gay with refreshing color harmonies a virtual fashion along these lines is now developing. Both the spirits and the physical self feel better for the change.

It's so easy, and so fascinating, to make the transformation-to enliven depressing corners to make frigid-looking rooms glow with hues of warmth. You simply choose from the smart distinctive new designs in Lloyd furniture

win you compliments for good taste is an easy matter. Your dealer will gladly help.

Why Lloyd finishes are so rich and enduring Lloyd furniture takes color tones beautifully because it is made of specially prepared, smooth, durable fabric which is woven to the consistency of wood on marvellous looms invented in the Lloyd factories. This fabric becomes literally impregnated throughout with each coloring that is used.

As further assurance of durability, each upright strand of Lloyd fibre is bulwarked with an invisible core of tested steel wire

woven in when the fabric is woven at a speed 250 times faster than human hands-effecting such savings in production cost that prices for a whole suite are fre

10 pay for a single piece. and the effect of costly re-decora- quently less than you would expect

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E offer our services to large
commercial organizations

which contemplate revision

or enlargement of their financial
arrangements in the fields of domestic
or foreign business.

Complete facilities for the financing of Domestic
and Foreign Trade.

BROWN, SHIPLEY & COMPANY

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Founders Court, Lothbury

LONDON, E. C.

Office for Travelers

123 Pall Mall, LONDON, S. W.

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THE MAGIC FIRE SPELL, painted for the STEINWAY COLLECTION by N. C. WYETH

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THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY, October, 1928, Vol. 142, No. 4. Published monthly. Publication Office, 10 Ferry Street, Concord, New Hampshire. Editorial and General Offices, 8 Arlington Street, Boston, Massachusetts. 40c a copy, $4.00 a year, foreign postage $1.00. Entered as second-class matter July 15, 1918, at the Post Office at Concord, New Hampshire, U. S. A., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Printed in the U. S. A.

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