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pink bow of surpassing width and shini- like to crawl along the floor an' see is ness, was the acknowledged "swell dresser" Miss Devons wearin' white shoes, M'ree of the department, and Miss Devons had Ramsay." frequently wondered how such a vision of “I 'm wearing brown ones," Miss Deloveliness could come out of the two small vons interposed, hastening to interrupt a rooms where she dwelt with her mother conversation which threatened to become and four sisters. Somehow or other the as heated as the atmosphere. "I think miracle was accomplished, and "M'ree's" both your boots are lovely, girls, and I feel clothes were ever the despair of her imita- quite shabby when I look at all these beautors. ,

To-day, however, her superiority tiful clothes." was threatened by the appearance of Louisa She smiled upon the eager groups, and May in boots of the latest style. Of shin- Florabel, gentlest of souls, hastened to reing patent leather, they extended half-way

assure her. to the knee, and then merged into stiff "You ain't got no call to feel badly,” tops, with tassels of silk and gold thread. she protested, inspecting Miss Devons's Before the glory of these, M'ree's boots of cool linen suit and broad-brimmed sailorwhite kid, with black-eyed pearl buttons, hat. “It ain't all the time easy to wear faded into insignificance, and Miss Devons your best clothes, an' what you got on is was obliged to remind the company that awful becomin', if they is kind o'plain.” it is not customary for a lady to travel Reassured as to her appearance, Miss with her feet on the back of the seat in Devons turned again to Etta, who had front of her before Louisa May could be snuggled into her seat and was leaning induced to stop vaunting her glories in the against her shoulder. air.

Are you comfy, honey?" she in"Well, certainlee, Louisa May," M'ree quired, smiling into the upturned blue declared, with a toss of her brown curls, eyes. "them boots is elegant; but Mommer thinks "Jawohl,” murmured Etta, basking in white boots is kind of refined for a party. the sunshine of caresses. “I likes awful I always wear black boots to church, ex- goot to be lofed like dis. Not for long haf cept it 's a holiday; but white boots is nice I so lofed become. All times is it lonely for the country, don't you think?"

here, an' I should to go home, you think?" M'ree's speech was as refined as her ap- "Well, I don't know, deary," said Miss pearance, and the shot went home, for the Devons, drawing the little figure closer. audience well knew that Louisa May “You know your father wanted you to owned but the one pair of “dressy" boots. grow up here and learn all the wonderful

"White boots is nice for kids," she re- things girls know in America; so suppose torted; "but these is all the style for la- you try to like it better, and soon I think dies."

you won't be so lonely. Mrs. Sieling is M'ree colored hotly. She, who was six very kind to you, is n't she?” months the elder, to be accused of baby- “Teacher, jawohl she iss kind. It iss ishness!

not kind, but lofe I vants. So awful lonely “Maybe you ain't never been down to am I all times for somebody to lofe me Manhattan Beaches,” she declared. “Mom- alone like mein fader did.” And Etta's mer's cousin was down to it last summer, blue eyes wandered mournfully over and she says as how the ladies sits in rows the car, alighting, with the perversity of all day long, changing to clean pairs. She her sex, upon Mark, leader of the Avenue says how their gentlemen friends don't A gang and despiser of womankind. "I care nothin' for the clothes they puts on, likes awful well to vash an' cook for some but they don't let 'em step on their boats one vat lofes me,” sighed Etta. except they 're wearin' white shoes. She For a short space all was peaceful, and says she seen that continuously. So, there, then from the end of the car, where some Louisa May!"

thirty boys were congregated, arose a wail Any one else would have been crushed of angry despair. by this evidence, but M'ree's opponent “You lie! It ain't so. You lemme git rallied nobly.

at him!” "Manhattan Beaches ain't so awful Miss Devons extricated herself and tony," she retorted loftily. "Mebbe you 'd went forward, for this promised trouble.

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ducted a thriving candy-shop on Second

Once acros Avenue, and all went merrily until Mr. aboard the si Sieling fell under an elevated train and and when the was killed, leaving Etta to his wife. girls in prim Unlike the traditional German stepmother, mostly on th she treated Etta like one of her own brood, dows, they w even bestowing her first name upon her, boy but had that the child might feel at one with her Sunday tie fo own children, who had added Mr. Sieling's mother; not name to their own, a complicated, but by dress ironed no means unusual arrangement. Unfor- and had sle tunately, Mrs. Schwartz - Sieling had left the Fatherland too young to remember the homelife there, and Etta. for eleven years her father's only care, missed sadly the kisses and caresses to which she had been accustomed. Meeting with practical kindness, but no cuddling whatsoever, she gave

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THE CENTURY MAGAZINE ducted a thriving candy-shop on Second Once across the river, the party *** Avenue, and all went merrily until Mr. aboard the special car reserved by Sieling fell under an elevated train and and when they had settled there is was killed, leaving Etta to his wife. girls in prim pairs on the seats, on Unlike the traditional German stepmother, mostly on the floor and out of she treated Etta like one of her own brood, dows, they were a sight to behol even bestowing her first name upon her, boy but had had his face scrubbeé es that the child might feel at one with her Sunday tie forced upon him by an e own children, who had added Mr. Sieling's mother; not a girl but had had y name to their own, a complicated, but by dress ironed in the small hours of the " no means unusual arrangement. Unfor- and had slept, or rather not slept

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tunately, Mrs. Schwartz - Sieling had left the Fatherland too young to remember the homelife there, and Etta, for eleven years her father's only care, missed sadly the kisses and caresses to which she had been accustomed. Meeting with practical kindness, but no cuddling whatsoever, she gave herself up to

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pink bow of surpassing width and shini- like to crawl along the floor an' see is ness, was the acknowledged "swell dresser" Miss Devons wearin' white shoes, M'ree of the department, and Miss Devons had Ramsay." frequently wondered how such a vision of “I 'm wearing brown ones,” Miss Deloveliness could come out of the two small vons interposed, hastening to interrupt a rooms where she dwelt with her mother conversation which threatened to become and four sisters. Somehow or other the as heated as the atmosphere. "I think miracle was accomplished, and “M'ree's" both your boots are lovely, girls, and I feel clothes were ever the despair of her imita- quite shabby when I look at all these beautors. To-day, however, her superiority tiful clothes." was threatened by the appearance of Louisa She smiled upon the eager groups, and May in boots of the latest style. Of shin- Florabel, gentlest of souls, hastened to reing patent leather, they extended half-way assure her. to the knee, and then merged into stiff "You ain't got no call to feel badly," tops, with tassels of silk and gold thread. she protested, inspecting Miss Devons's Before the glory of these, M'ree's boots of cool linen suit and broad-brimmed sailorwhite kid, with black-eyed pearl buttons, hat. "It ain't all the time easy to wear faded into insignificance, and Miss Devons your best clothes, an' what you got on is was obliged to remind the company that awful becomin', if they is kind o' plain." it is not customary for a lady to travel Reassured as to her appearance, Miss with her feet on the back of the seat in Devons turned again to Etta, who had front of her before Louisa May could be snuggled into her seat and was leaning induced to stop vaunting her glories in the against her shoulder. air.

“Are you comfy, honey?" she in"Well, certainlee, Louisa May," M'ree quired, smiling into the upturned blue declared, with a toss of her brown curls, eyes. "them boots is elegant; but Mommer thinks "Jawohl," murmured Etta, basking in white boors is kind of refined for a party. the sunshine of caresses. “I likes awful I always wear black boots to church, ex- goot to be lofed like dis. Not for long haf cept it's a holiday; but white boots is nice I so lofed become. All times is it lonely for the country, don't you think?” here, an' I should to go home, you think?"

MI'ree's speech was as refined as her ap- "Well, I don't know, deary," said Miss pearance, and the shot went home, for the Devons, drawing the little figure closer. audience well knew that Louisa May "You know your father wanted you to owned but the one pair of "dressy" boots. grow up here and learn all the wonderful

"White boots is nice for kids," she re- things girls know in America; so suppose torted; "but these is all the style for la- you try to like it better, and soon I think dies."

you won't be so lonely. Mrs. Sieling is M'ree colored hotly. She, who was six very kind to you, is n't she?" months the elder, to be accused of baby- “Teacher, jawohl she iss kind. It iss ishness!

not kind, but lofe I vants. So awful lonely "Maybe you ain't never been down to am I all times for somebody to lofe me Manhattan Beaches," she declared. "Mom- alone like mein fader did." And Etta's mer's cousin was down to it last summer, blue eyes wandered mournfully over and she says as how the ladies sits in rows the car, alighting, with the perversity of all day long, changing to clean pairs. She her sex, upon Vark, leader of the Avenue says how their gentlemen friends don't A gang and despiser of womankind. “I care nothin' for the clothes they puts on,

likes awful well to vash an' cook for some but they don't let 'em step on their boats one vat lofes me," sighed Etta. except they 're wearin' white shoes. She For a short space all was peaceful, and says she seen that continuously. So, there, then from the end of the car, where some Louisa May!"

thirty boys were congregated, arose a wail Any one else would have been crushed of angry despair. by this evidence, but W'ree's opponent "You lie! It ain't so. You lemme git rallied nobly.

at him!” "Manhattan Beaches ain's so awful Miss Devons extricated herself and tony," she retorted loftily. “Mebbe you 'd went forward, for this promised trouble.

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tered the land.
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de- "BEFORE THE GLORY OF THESE, M'REE'S BOOTS OF with

WHITE KID,... FADED INTO INSIGNIFICANCE" every she watched with longing eyes the merry groups she the thin knees, and the female was too shy to join, or envied with all her of the expedition prepared to equal sad little heart the favored few who with the ever-happy subject of were singled out for the clumsy atten- For, the moment the rent is paid oli tions of the gallants of the class. How times before, the East Side plus gladly, thought Etta, would she return, wardrobe regardless of the landet. after the briefest of sucks, a gift of Nellie may have a white graduatia

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gundy, it it were ever offered her, and what trimmed with innumerable fromance

Now, Marie (christened Man) say, whose brown curls bobbel

gratitude she would bestow upon the lordly with "Val," and that Albert en giver! Moreover, she was an accom- Dew suit for confirmation. It plished little housewife, and the happy-go- mother's absorbing anxieties and lucky housekeeping of her stepmother filled trancing result is that even the her tidy soul with horror, so that the land babies in New York are was accursed in her sight, and her only dirt and shabbiness. the moments were those when she sat,

shadow of her teacher's arm.

be

A ring of boys was formed about Paul, "Hush, Paul!" Miss Devons interposed the youngest member of the department, gently. “Why did George say you could whose fiery spirit and artistic nature made n't go in swimming? Don't you know him an easy prey to tormentors. Paul was how to swim?" poor as to outward circumstances. Not “Yes, ma'am, I kin swim good. I learnt even the holiday could alter his garb from it last summer.” the thin red sweater and patched trousers “Then why should n't he go in? What he wore the year round; but starved and are you laughing at, George?” frail as was his body, his eyes gleamed with George was sniggering unpleasantly, an unconquerable spirit, and his nervous and his mirth was reflected on the surlittle fists were doubled up threateningly rounding faces. at big George Finsen, who leaned against “Teacher," – it was Mark O'Reilley the back of a seat as he repeated his taunt. who stood forward, -"dat kid can't go in

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“You dassen't go in swimmin'. You no water. He don't never swim except knows you dassen't.”

it 's July or August. His mother“What is the trouble, boys?" Miss "You shut up!” blazed Paul. "It's Devons made her way into the circle and all a lie.” laid a soothing hand on Paul's arm. Thoroughly annoyed, Miss Devons gave “Why should n't he go in swimming, the boy a slight shake. George?”

"Keep quiet, Paul! Now, Mark, go on. But George, the son of the corner pub- What is the trouble about?" lican, only grinned foolishly and scrabbled “No, ma'am; I can't tell you dat. on the floor with the toe of his shiny boots. 'T ain't nuttin' I kin tell yer. Finsen he

“I was only foolin' the kid,” he mut- was foolin', an' de kid got nutty, see? I tered. “He's a reg'lar cry-baby. Can't dunno is it a straight tip what dey says, say nothin' but he howls."

but, anyway, 't ain't nuttin' I kin tell yer.' Paul's big eyes had indeed filled with “I 'll tell you,” Paul broke in, too angry sudden tears at his teacher's touch, but he to heed the scandalized looks of his mates; faced his enemy bravely.

but before he could continue, an agonized "It 's all a lie," he reiterated. “You voice interrupted : come outer here, an' I 'll show yer."

“Paul, you mus' not! Eet ees not for way down."

ladies to hear. Mees Devons, you no first to plunge into the blue water, scarcely leesten, I beg-a you." Giuseppe was waiting to don the suit provided for him pleading with hands, eyes, and suppliant in the bathing-tent; and who but Giuseppe body. “No' for ladies-please-a, Mees Salvatori outswam the whole crowd, side Devons. Eet ees not nice at all.”

stroke, back, and front, diving and under "Aw, shut up!" George exclaimed sul- water? Even Mark, wharf-rat as he was, lenly. “It ain't nothin' so bad. Only could not compete with the boy who, the somebody tells me how his mother puts year before, had been disporting himself papers round her kids an' sews 'em on in in the Bay of Naples, and Miss Devons winter to keep 'em warm. An' they don't noted with quick pleasure that none took take 'em off till summer. Ain't that so,

greater pride in the Italian's feats than kid?"

Mark himself, former persecutor and now "It 's a lie!" shrieked Paul, glaring patron of the laughing-eyed Italian. . wildly around. “I'll show yer.”

"Well, Giuseppe,” she said, as he flung Before his horrified friends could inter- himself on the warm sand at her feet. fere, he had torn off his jersey and stood "You are having a fine swim, are n't you? before them in woefully thin Aannels, his It must remind you of Italy.” bare little ribs showing through many a He shook his head with a quick glance big hole.

at her. “Who says I got papers on?” he de- “Ah, no,” he said softly; "no lak Italy, manded. “I ain't no park bum, see?".

this sweem.

Here eet ees all dead so soon In another minute he would have dis- you go undaire. Ah close-a my eyes; all carded the shirt itself had Miss Devons black, all lak dead man. In Italy eet ees not interfered.

so light, so gay, so blue, lak wine all-all “Put on your jersey, Paul!" she said, handing it to him. “And, George, the He drew a long breath, and into his next time you want to tease, choose some- dark eyes crept a shadow. body of your own size.

If there is any

“But you are happy here, are n't you, more trouble, I shall get off at the next Giuseppe ?" stop and leave you to find your way home “I am American," he answered proudly. alone."

Some day I vote jus' lak Mark say. In This threat sufficed to calm all angry Italy I no can vote lak here. Mark, he passions, for the East-Sider is lost outside

say—his own district, and Miss Devons re- "Say, kid, I want yer!" Mark's voice turned to the girls, who were discussing rang out across the waves, and with a the incident with horrified gusto.

flashing smile of farewell Giuseppe raced "My, ain't it awful the way them boys off, proud to be called by his leader. scraps!" murmured M'ree, as she glanced Meanwhile Etta had summoned up at the combatants from under her curls. courage to join the other girls in wading "Boys is somethin' fierce; they ain't got no and scrambling over the rocks and, quite more manners 'n a goat."

carried away by the novel pastime, she had “He don't ought to take off shirts in climbed to a respectable eminence before comp'ny,” said Etta, forgetting her shy- she looked back. When she did so, terror

“Dot vas not von polite t'ing to struck to her soul. Alone she stood upon do."

a high rock the slippery sides of which she “It 's a pity some one don't smack that had ascended by means of footholds which George Finsen," Louisa May remarked now appeared hopelessly inadequate for briskly. “He 's awful fresh, I think.”

support. Her appealing cries awoke Rockaway at last! Out tumbled eighty- screams of sympathy from the girls and four children, screaming with delight, shouts of advice from the boys; but these dancing up and down in the dusty road, served only to bewilder her the more, and rolling headlong on the cool grass, pursu- when Miss Devons arrived upon the scene ing every living creature within sight, and she saw that the child was in real danger generally enjoying themselves. First they of falling headlong upon the rocks below. visited the beach, where the boys swam "My, ain't it awful!" sighed Louisa and the girls paddled to their hearts' con- May, who was, as usual, well to the fore. tent. Then who but little Paul was the “I guess you an' me 'll have to break it to

66

ness.

LXXXII-67

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