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A nation resolved to consume only its own ries; (C) Temporary protection for new products would resemble a man who tried industries when it is probable that we may to raise himself by tugging at his own sus- be able finally to obtain a home supply as penders. This beneficent exchange of cheap or cheaper than from abroad, and commodities is followed by hosts of visitors in extreme cases even if we have to pay to and from every nation, and the French more for a home supply of articles essenproverb is soon seen to be true: viz., that tial for national safety until the killing of "we only hate those we do not know.” men by men in war has gone the way of Thus, the peoples of the world tend more private war (duelling) and the selling and more through commerce to be drawn of men by men (slavery) throughout the into the bonds of brotherhood,

wide boundaries of the English-speaking In conclusion, here is the sound doc- race. trine: (A) No duties upon the necessaries Such is the ABC of the Tariff Quesof life; (B) Heavy duties upon all luxų- tion.

TOPICS OF THE TIME

even

LAWLESSNESS AND THE PRESS mitory, and with pajamas drawn over

their clothes, execute a carnival dance in ANY have been the mornings in re- the halls, the treatment accorded the event cent months when the

pages

of is in harmony with its importance to a conservative newspapers have looked more newspaper that has to be sold to be apprelike catalogues of crime, than like "jour- ciated, nals of civilization."

And almost any Stodgy crimes like the ordinary killings morning has been rich enough in the har- and poisonings, "black-hand" stealings vest of human depravity to enable the sen- and explosions, strike outrages, public desational newspapers (as one may readily falcations, and plain burglaries, are set judge from the flamboyant pictures and forth with an exhaustiveness alike stimuhead-lines to be seen in any street-car) to lating to those inclined to follow criminal rivet the attention of millions of readers, example, and terrifying to those fearful of by scandal and crime, to pages thought- becoming future victims. It is plain that fully interspersed with announcements of the average sensational editor handles a reduced bargains.

topic of that sort with a determination to And what a medley of frivolity and bar- surpass his rival's “duty to publicity," by barity these ingenious editors are able to making the most of its possibilities as salaconcoct, from day to day! No end of ble news. No matter if premature publimaterial is ready to their hands; no class cation will baffle so-called "justice"; the of citizens or section of the country but public shall know all of the hideous realfurnishes its quota of incident. Ordinary ity, and more than all of the imaginary blackguardism by plain ruffians receives an direfulness, even if civilization must ordinary dressing, but unusual instances - thereby perish lingeringly on the altar of unusual because of the supposed refine- journalistic commerce. ment of the actors, and not for scarcity-- But it is the social fault or excess of are set forth with unusual piquancy and certain persons, prominent, or both rich detail. A riot at a great university, in and prominent, that commands the sensawhich intellectual youth pits itself with tional editor's heartiest efforts. Here is jocund motive against public order and a material that is susceptible of the greatest brutal police, is set forth in a way to in- variety of treatment, day after day, with vite emulation by the rivals of Cornell ;

the surest commercial profit. The more and when the young gentlemen of an Ohio trifling the matter, the greater the opporcollege break into the young ladies' dor- tunity for getting in the deadly work of rumor and innuendo. And even if a wrig- For twenty years a committee of wogling victim should succeed in establishing men of the “Baltimore Yearly Meeting mistaken identity, two good “stories"- of Friends” has been accumulating anone to launch the imposture, and another swers to that very pertinent question. Like to sink it entertainingly,-would still be Quaker

Quaker gentlewomen they have gone to the credit of journalistic enterprise. about their mission with courtesy and pa

In our Democratic America a title of tience. When they have seen in a publinobility, real or assumed, spurs the sensa- cation news-articles, pictures, or advertisetional editor into an excess of activity to ments which any sane person of average do his duty to the true nobility of the judgment would concede to be encourageworld, - those who work for a living, and ment to vice, or stimulus to crime, they who demand, for a cent, real and imagi- have made a personal appeal to the editor nary knowledge of all the extravagances or owner, asking “Why?"; and also askand frailties of the aristocracy of birth ing: Why not exclude such stuff in the and wealth.

interest of women and children,- if not Divorces, either projected, or in process for the love of home and country? Their of being sought by western residence, or last report expresses satisfaction with the merely suspended or resumed, if discov- results of their many years of effort, for ered or suspected at the inception, are sus- they have not always been rebuffed, and ceptible of conversion into columns of they are possessed, by the power of God's "news" as good as gold to a newspaper's love, with a hope that some time in Amertill. In addition, the new combinations of ica all the representatives of the press will the legally untied afford an imperative regard a sense of public decency of as basis for revivals of the old, appetizing much importance as intellectual reputadetails.

tion, or newspaper profits. The field of social torture for the amuse- In a gentle spirit, these Quaker misment of readers who have a cent to spend, sionaries to our intellectual heathen record would appear to be as expansive as human that the excuse commonly offered with a nature; but the sensational editor never rebuff, is the stereotyped phrase: “We quite shows his full ability to satisfy the give the public what it demands." public craving for human outrage unless So, also, does the professional gambler misfortune, mischance, or caprice plunges respond to a public demand; likewise the a well-to-do and sensitive family into the purveyors of social vice; the distributor of deepest sorrow. Then the inventions of indecent pictures, the peddlers of debasing penny-dreadfuls, the mendacity of keyhole drugs and other corrupting merchandise. spies, and the cruelties of the middle ages None of them would be in business except pale before the exploits of those who for a public demand, and all of them preach (for personal profit) that “a free would do more business if the laws alpress is the palladium of our liberties." lowed them a free hand in stimulating the Such an incident furnished New York, demand. It is only those who do business and indeed the whole country, with the under the banner of “a free press” who highest example of this sort of “devotion may pollute the stream of public demand to the public interest,” and vas made to as much as they please, and do so without last through the busiest and most crowded even the pretense of serving any useful winter known to the scandal industry. purpose except their own sordid profit.

At intervals some foreign gentleman, Even some of the best and most valiant fortunate in all the circumstances of life newspapers appear to look with distrust except a prominence that attracts the in- on any suggestion to curb by law this unterviewer, arrives on these shores and runs bridled license, lest their own freedom of the gantlet of inquisition and ridicule judgment should be menaced. from the Atlantic to the Pacific, either All of the press is in principle opposed with good-natured surprise, or dumb in- to the encouragement of physical lawlessdignation; and after getting acquainted ness, which, in great variety, abounds at with the institution that is called "the the present time; not a few are doing imenterprising American press," he asks, portant service in educating public opinion with a smile compounded of stupefaction against the lawless type of labor agitator; and amazement: “But, why?"

most of the press strives continually and

A nation resolved to consume only its own ries; (C) Temporary protection f
products would resemble a man who tried industries when it is probable that
to raise himself by tugging at his own sus- be able finally to obtain a home si
penders. This beneficent exchange of cheap or cheaper than from abr
commodities is followed by hosts of visitors in extreme cases even if we hav
to and from every nation, and the French more for a home supply of artic'
proverb is soon seen to be true: viz., that tial for national safety until the
"we only hate those we do not know." men by men in war has gone t}
Thus, the peoples of the world tend more private war (duelling) and †
and more through commerce to be drawn of men by men (slavery) thro
into the bonds of brotherhood.

wide boundaries of the Engli
In conclusion, here is the sound doc-
trine: (A) No duties upon the necessaries Such is the A B C of the 7
of life; (B) Heavy duties upon all luxų- tion.

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LAWLESSNESS AND THE PRESS mitory, and with pajam.

their clothes, execute a c ANY have been the mornings in re- the halls, the treatment as

cent months when the of is in harmony with its conservative newspapers have looked more newspaper that has to be like catalogues of crime, than like "jour- ciated. nals of civilization."

And almost any

Stodgy crimes like the morning has been rich enough in the har- and poisonings, “blac vest of human depravity to enable the sen- and explosions, strike o sational newspapers (as one may readily falcations, and plain judge from the Alamboyant pictures and forth with an exhaust head-lines to be seen in any street-car) to lating to those inclined rivet the attention of millions of readers, example, and terrifyin: by scandal and crime, to pages thought- becoming future victi: fully interspersed with announcements of the average sensation reduced bargains.

topic of that sort wie And what a medley of frivolity and bar surpass his rival's " / barity these ingenious editors are able to making the most of concoct, from day to day! No end of ble news. No matt material is ready to their hands; no class cation will baffle si of citizens or section of the country but public shall know furnishes its quota of incident. Ordinary ity, and more tha: blackguardism by plain ruffians receives an direfulness, even ordinary dressing, but unusual instances - thereby perish lin unusual because of the supposed refine- journalistic comm' ment of the actors, and not for scarcity-- But it is the are set forth with unusual piquancy and certain persons, i detail. A riot at a great university, in and prominent, which intellectual youth pits itself with tional editor's h: jocund motive against public order and a material that is brutal police, is set forth in a way to in- variety of treat vite emulation by the rivals of Cornell; the surest comi and when the young gentlemen of an Ohio triling the ma: college break into the young ladies' dor- tunity for gett

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APROPOS OF THE TERCENTENARY

with great ability for the higher interests legitimate news to fill all the columns of the of the nation; but a minor part of the newspapers? press which, mirabile dictu, circulates more widely than all the rest of the press It is significant, as applying to our own put together, is so engrossed with the duty argument, that newspapers are not in acof supplying advertisers with the largest cord as to what constitutes “legitimate circulation,” that as a regular line of busi- news”; also that the entire sensational ness it seeks, consciously, and with almost press, especially in its Sunday supplements, insane activity, to outrage private right makes a special feature of crime rehashes, and shock public decency, - lest overstimu- and crime inventions, with startling piclated and jaded readers should find in a tures of "hold-ups," and burglaries, in rival sheet a mess of social slime and hu- which revolvers are always Aourished. man misery more to their vitiated taste. This “wave of crime” has been rising for

Therein lies the answer to the "why” many years, in fact since the advent of of this journalistic degradation: the pre- certain enterprising spirits in journalism; tended “public demand" is a response to a but the "mystery" of its progress resides fabricated supply-and the sole motive for in the silence of serious newspapers, and the the infamy is the profit of a business amazing indifference of teachers, preachmeaner than stealing and more degrading ers, legislators, and the thinking public. than the social evil. And, after all, the worst feature of the

THE KING JAMES BIBLE activities of the sensational press is its cultivation of lawless thinking, which is the

HE a

bedded in the thought, speech, and thought imagine that wide-spread daily ex- character of the English-speaking peoples ploitation of Evil does not result in the

that it has a place in literature and an auextension of the curse that is craved?

thority greater than that of any other The question "why?" is an old one, and book. The fact that it is a translation is our legislators, profusely assisted by the remembered by scholars and students; but press, always answer it in the same way: in the hands of nine generations it has "A free press is the palladium of our lib- been an original work. This means that erties."

the translation has the vital energy of

style, the moving power, the convincing As this page is being arranged for the phrasing of original literature of the very press the New York “Sun” has an edito- highest rank. It is not too much to say rial entitled "A Mystery of the 'Wave of that in the translation from the Hebrew Crime.'”With no attempt to convey the

and Greek into English, the Bible has excellent argument, we submit a few per- gained in vitality and penetrating power, tinent extracts:

It is this almost unparalleled freshness of

spirit and speech that has made the EngWhat starts the "wave of crime"? Does lish Bible the text-book of a race of worldthe public first become hysterical and affect wide relations and influence. Its content certain newspapers, or do the newspapers of religious truth and its form of speech themselves supply the initial impulse? ... are so vitally unified that each contributes That an unusual nervous condition has to the other and reinforces its effect. It somehow been produced in a part of the is, therefore, not only a great work of litpopulation is not to be questioned. .. He

erature but a historical document of is an incompetent city editor who cannot

greater importance in the national life of supply in any large community a "carnival the English-speaking peoples than Magna of crime” on six hours' notice and set on Charta. edge the apprehensions and fears of a num

The sources of the English Bible go ber of persons sufficient to justify his course. back to Cædmon and Bede; and half a

But the introduction of the present dozen men of genius contributed to the "wave of crime” is in a manner mysterious. richness of phrase, the noble cadence, the Why should it make its appearance at a lofty rhythm of a translation which grew moment when there is an ample quantity of out of a remark made by King James to a

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