The Approach to Philosophy

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1905 - 448 psl.
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21 Examples of Religious Belief
66
Typical Religious Phenomena Conversion
69
Piety
72
Religious Instruments Symbolism and Modes of Conveyance
74
Historical Types of Religion Primitive Re ligions
77
Buddhism
78
Critical Religion
80
THE PHILOSOPHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF RELIGION
82
Religion Means to be Practically True God is a Disposition from which Consequences May Rationally be Expected 85 1
85
Historical Examples of Religious Truth and Error The Religion of Baal
88
Greek Religion
92
Judaism and Christianity
95
The Cognitive Factor in Religion
96
The Place of Imagination in Religion
97
The Special Functions of the Religious Imagi nation
101
The Relation between Imagination and Truth in Religion
105
NATURAL SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY
114
METAPHYSICS AND EPISTOMOLOGY
149
THE NORMATIVE SCIENCES AND
180
78 Priority of Concepts
188
Æsthetics Deals with the Most General Con ditions of Beauty Subjectivistic and For malistic Tendencies
189
Ethics Deals with the Most General Conditions of Moral Goodness
191
Rationalism
193
Eudæmonism and Pietism Rigorism and Intuitionism
195
Duty and Freedom Ethics and Metaphysics
196
The Virtues Customs and Institutions
198
The Problems of Religion The Special In terests of Faith
199
Theology Deals with the Nature and Proof of God
200
The Cosmological Proof of God
203
The Teleological Proof of God
204
God and the World Theism and Pantheism
205
Metaphysics and Theology
207
Psychology is the Theory of the Soul
208
Spiritual Substance
209
Intellectualism and Voluntarism
210
Freedom of the Will Necessitarianism De terminism and Indeterminism
211

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