Puslapio vaizdai
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He heard her quick step on the companionway.

"Shane. Shane, are you there? Shane, Shane, what 's wrong?" She came into the shrouded light of the binnacle. "Shane, who-who is this?"

"My name 's Flannagan, Miss O'Malley-Royal Navy. I'm sorry; you can't land."

"What does it mean, Shane?"
"You 're beaten, Granya."
"Are we prisoners?"

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want to do this."

She leaned forward and kissed him
The lieutenant turned away.

"And now good-by."

"Why good-by? I 'm not going ashore. I'll stick."

"Dear Shane, you would." She caught his hand, pressed, dropped it. Her voice rang out: "But I'm going ashore." She had swung over the taffrail and dropped into the water with the soft splash of a fish "My God!" Shane swore with rage. "Wait! "Wait! I'll get her. Will you stand by with your boat?" "Right-o" Flannagan answered cheerily.

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He heard her soft, rhythmical strokes ahead . . He tore after her caught up reached her

shoulder

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"Come back, Granya!"

"No, Shane."

"No, Miss O'Malley; just you can't land. And I'm very distressed to tell you You may not land anywhere, anytime, in her Majesty's dominions." He had decided, once he reached "That does n't shut out Mr. Camp- her, to turn her back by force, but the bell, does it?" strange gentle voice restrained him. "I've no orders against him, Miss All this matter of Ireland all this

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expedition of opera bouffe, took on again a strange dimension when she spoke All the time he had been foolish, he knew, and, worse, looked like a fool; but some strange magic of her voice made it seem natural the naïve brave gestures One levitated above Even this moon-madness did not seem trivial and a thing for laughter A dignity of ancient stories was in it The blue Irish hills, soft as down, the little moon, and the tide hurrying out of the lough to the great Atlantic A wrench of the will, and he gripped her shoulder: "Shane, please don't!"

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"You 're coming back, Granya.” "I'm not, Shane, and please don't hold me! I'm getting weak.”

"You'll never make it, Granya. And if you did, where would you go on the Donegal hills?"

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"I don't know, Shane. But please dig out a parson around here some

let me go, I implore you

Even if I do go down

Don't

you see? There is nothing for me but this or death .. My life

oh, Shane, let me go!"

where and bring him on board?"

"Oh, Shane, what do you want that for?" She had n't gone below, but waited in the companionway.

"You don't think you 're going

"Quiet, Granya!" He caught her wandering around with me, casually,

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Our Medicine-Men

By ONE OF THEM

III-How Are We Educating Our Doctors?
Drawings by CLARENCE DAY, JR.

OTHING could be more disconcert- requires several years of preliminary

Ning to the observer of the trend of college training.

medical education than the confusion and cross-purpose that exist in regard to the kind of preliminary study necessary to those who aspire to become physicians. This lack of agreement is due, without doubt, to the bouleversement caused by the new importance of science in medicine. Many points of view exist among the professors whose duty it is to train physicians. Some insist that the doctor requires a broad cultural training. They demand that he should be versed in Latin, so that he may write his prescriptions accurately. He should, in addition, have a good knowledge of Greek, so that he may be able to unravel the meanings of the enormous number of recondite words existing in the mystic jargon of physicians. What is more, the growing politico-socio-economic importance of his profession requires that he have a knowledge of economics and political science and sociology. Again, since his métier carries with it the necessity of social prestige, he should be able to discourse upon the Elizabethan dramatists and upon the intellectual accomplishments of Neanderthal man. It is evident that the acquisition of such a vast body of irrelevant and unrelated knowledge

The apostles of the necessity of broad culture are opposed by educators who are convinced that the basis of medicine is now scientific. They count the ideas of the whoopers for broad culture as amiable bosh, and insist that the three or four years of preliminary training of the medical aspirant be devoted to science rather than to the acquisition of high-sounding nonsense.

Between these two opposing camps stand those who desire to compromise. These educators wish to combine the study of scientific and cultural subjects in a two-, three-, or four-year premedical course. medical course. This idea is probably at present in the ascendancy, despite the fact that it is manifestly impossible to receive thorough training in either of these two fields in so short a time.

The method pursued by the majority of prominent medical colleges is to require two years of pre-medical (mainly scientific) study, and to make a three or four years preparation optional to this. This system leads to great dissatisfaction, especially among the few students who have completed a college degree before entering the actual study of medicine. These persons are faced by two disturbing facts. In the

first place, the average youth will not for a moment consider lingering in the academic grove for four years when he can plunge into what he considers the real preparation for his life's work after two short years of preliminary study. Hence the more adequately trained person finds himself in the demoralizing position of associating with persons who are obviously his inferiors in training, but who suffer no ostensible disadvantage in their actual medical studies. What is worse, he finds himself in the rear of persons who have confined themselves to the minimum requirement of the pre-medical two years in some minor college, and who, as third-year men in medicine, consider themselves to be vastly his superiors.

Another condition, still more disintegrating to the morale, faces the student who comes to the study of medicine after four years of good scientific preparation. This youth, following the advice of those supposed to know, has been convinced that the foundations of the intelligent study of medicine lie in mathematics, physics, and chemistry. He enters the first medical courses with confidence, aware of his superiority over the majority of his fellows. It is easy, then, to imagine his dismay when he discovers that he knows far more of physics and chemistry than many of his medical instructors, and finds himself surrounded by glib-memoried, poorly prepared young ignoramuses who shine by reason of their parrot-like ability to reel off an enormous number of unrelated facts crammed out of textbooks. The better-prepared person, whom a training in mathematics, physics, and chemistry has taught to question and to think rather than to

remember voluminously, idiotically, and indiscriminately, finds himself in the rear ranks, and is apt to turn with bitterness upon those advisers who had the effrontery to pretend that the basis of medicine is really scientific.

The person thus trained in science who discerns the preposterous nature of this intensive intellectual stuffing, thereupon pays less and less attention to its pursuit. As a result, he begins to be looked upon as an inferior student, and generally becomes offensive to the nostrils of the anatomical instructors. These, in faculty meetings, transmit their opinion of the unhappy student's ability to their colleagues of other branches. This stigma is likely to cling to him throughout his career in the medical course.

On the other hand, the student may plunge blindly, but manfully, forward, spending whole mornings in classrooms, entire afternoons in the laboratory, and after a hastily snatched dinner, consume untold energy in a diligent, but befuddled, effort to memorize a sufficient modicum of each of his subjects to make a presentable showing in the class-room next day. He rarely has a moment for the thoughtful consideration of disease as a whole or of the organism as a whole. At last, as the end of the course approaches, he gathers himself together for a final supreme orgy of fact retention. On the day of the examination he regurgitates this body of knowledge to the best of his ability, and then with a sigh of relief proceeds as rapidly as possible to forget it, so that his tired brain may be cleared for the reception of new masses of doctrine in the ensuing courses.

This process of alternate stuffing and spewing goes on for two, indeed,

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