Two Months Abroad: Thirty-two Letters

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1878 - 280 psl.
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70 psl. - It is my wish that my ashes may repose on the banks of the Seine, in the midst of the French people, whom I have loved so well.
107 psl. - In fragments, choked up vaults, and frescos steep'd In subterranean damps, where the owl peep'd, Deeming it midnight : — Temples, baths or halls? Pronounce who can ; for all that learning reap'd From her research hath been, that these are walls — Behold the Imperial Mount ! 'tis thus the mighty falls.
147 psl. - There is a stern round tower of other days, ^ Firm as a fortress, with its fence of stone, Such as an army's baffled strength delays, Standing with half its battlements alone, And with two thousand years of ivy grown, The garland of eternity, where wave The green leaves over all by time o'erthrown ; — What was this tower of strength ? within its cave What treasure lay so lock'd, so hid ? — A woman's grave.
240 psl. - The hand that rounded Peter's dome And groined the aisles of Christian Rome Wrought in a sad sincerity; Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew; The conscious stone to beauty grew.
115 psl. - twere anew, the gaps of centuries ; Leaving that beautiful which still was so, And making that which was not, till the place Became religion, and the heart ran o'er With silent worship of the great of old ! — The dead, but sceptred sovereigns, who still rule Our spirits from their urns.
277 psl. - Ye ! who have traced the Pilgrim to the scene Which is his last, if in your memories dwell A thought which once was his, if on ye swell A single recollection, not in vain He wore his sandal-shoon and scallop-shell; Farewell ! with him alone may rest the pain, If such there were — with you, the moral of his strain.
235 psl. - Come unto me, all ye that labor, and are heavy-laden, and I will give you rest.
8 psl. - What front can we make against these unavoidable, victorious, maleficent forces? What can I do against the influence of Race, in my history? What can I do against hereditary and constitutional habits; against scrofula, lymph, impotence? against climate, against barbarism, in my country? I can reason down or deny everything, except this perpetual Belly: feed he must and will, and I cannot make him respectable.
114 psl. - Midst the chief relics of almighty Rome; The trees which grew along the broken arches Waved dark in the blue midnight, and the stars Shone through the rents of ruin ; from afar The watch-dog bayed beyond the Tiber : and, More near, from out the Caesars...
71 psl. - Farewell to thee, France ! — but when Liberty rallies Once more in thy regions, remember me then. The violet still grows in the depth of thy valleys ; Though wither'd, thy tear will unfold it again. Yet, yet, I may baffle the hosts that surround us, And yet may thy heart leap awake to my voice — There are links which must break in the chain that has bound us, Then turn thee and call on the Chief of thy choice ! LAMENT OF TASSO.

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