Early English Poetry, Ballads, and Popular Literature of the Middle Ages: The pastime of pleasure

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Percy Society, 1846
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17 psl. - In stede of grapes the rubies there did shyne. The flore was paved with berall clarified, With pillers made of stones precious, Like a place of pleasure so gayely glorified, It might be called a palaice glorious, So muche delectable and solacious. The hall was hanged, hye and circuler, With cloth of arras in the rychest maner, That treated well of a ful noble story, Of the doubty waye to the tower perillous; Howe a noble knyght should wynne the victory Of many a...
54 psl. - Both to contryve and eke to translate; And of vertue ever in especyally, For he dyd compyle than full nyally Of our blessed lady the conversacion, Saint Edmunde's life martred with treson. Of the fall of prynces, ryght wofully He did endyte in all piteous wyse, Folowynge his auctoure Bocas rufully; A ryght greate boke he did truly compryse, A good ensample for us to dispyse This worlde, so ful of mutabilyte, In whiche no man can have a certente. And thre reasons ryght greatly profytable Under coloure...
186 psl. - So long we rode over hill and valey, Tyll that we came into a wyldernes, On every syde there wylde beastes laye, Ryght straunge and fierce in sundry likenes; It was a place of dissolute darkenes. The ladies and I were in feare and doubt, Tyll at the last that we were gotten out Of the great woode upon a craggy roche, When cleare Dyana in the Scorpion Agaynst fayre Phebus began to approche, For to be at her whole opposition, We sawe from farre a goodly region, Where stode a palayce hye and precious,...
177 psl. - ... overcome the angry violence. Be hardy, bolde, and couragious; For after that ye be gone from hence, You shall mete with a gyaunt rigorious, Havyng seven heades of yll experience. You shall subdue him with your prudence ; And other adventures shall unto you fall, Whiche Fame shall cause to be memoriall. When it was tyme, I was brought to bedde, So all the long nyght I endured in rest ; With suche a slouth i-taken was my heade, That my soft pyllowe founde a good gest. For long before I was so opprest...
70 psl. - I toke my leve that tyde, And to thys temple where I do abyde Forthe than I went, alone to bewayle My mortall sorowe wythout any fayle. Now have I tolde you all the veray trouthe Of my wofull chaunce aud great unhappynesse. I praye you nothyng wyth me to be wrothe, Whyche am drouned in carefull wrethchednesse, By fortune plunged ful of doublenes. A, a! said Counseyle, doubte ye never a dele, But your disease I shal by wysdome hele. Remember yet, that never yet was he, That in this worlde dyd lede...
130 psl. - For fyrst, good hope his legge harneys sholde be; His habergion of perfyte ryghtwysenes; Gyrde faste wyth the gyrdle of chastite, His riche placarde should be good besines, Brandred with almes so full of larges; The helmet mekenes, and the shelde good fayth; His swerde Goddes worde, as saynt Poule sayth.
158 psl. - Nay, nay, quod he, it was for no shame; But, alas! for wo, that she hath me taken! I must obey, it can not be forsaken. His fete were fettered underneth his nagge, And bound his handes behinde to his bagge; Thus Correction, with her whyp did dryve The litle nagge wyth Godfrey Gobelyve Tyll at the last we gan to approche Her riall tour upon a craggy roche. The night was come, for it was right late; Yet right anone we came unto the gate, Where we were let in by dame Measure, That was a fayre and a...
31 psl. - As to the fyrst, your hole desyre was set Fables to fayne to eschewe ydlenes, Wyth amplyacion more connyng to get, By the laboure of inventyfe busynes, Touchynge the trouthe by covert lykenes To dysnull vyce and the vycious to blame; Your dedes therto exemplifyde the same. And secondly, ryght well you dyd endyte Of the worthy actes of many a conquerour; Through whych labour that you dyd so wryte Unto this day reygneth the honour Of every noble and myghty \varriour, And for your labour and your busy...
62 psl. - For musike doth sette in all unyte The discorde thynges whiche are variable And devoydeth myschiefe and greate iniquite. Where lacketh musyke there is no pleynte; For musyke is Concorde and also peace, Nothyng without musyke may well encreace. The vii. scyences in one monacorde, Eche upon other do full well depende; Musyke hath them so set in concorde, That all in one may right well extende. All perfite reason they do so comprehende, That theyr waye and perfite doctryne To the joye above, whiche...
69 psl. - ... temple olde, By the toure of Musyke at great solemnyte, La Bell Pucell I dyd ryght well beholde, Whose beaute clere and great humilite To my heart dyd cast the darte of amyte; After whyche stroke so harde and farvent, To her excellence I came incontinent. Beholdyng her chere and lovely countenaunce, Her garmentes ryche and her propre stature, ' I regestered well in my remembraunce That I never sawe so fayre a creature, So well favoured create by nature; That harde it is for to wryte wyth yncke...

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