Wordsworth and the Coleridges: With Other Memories, Literary and Political

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Macmillan, 1899 - 331 psl.
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311 psl. - With malice toward none, with charity for all, with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us finish the work we are in, to bind up the nation's wounds, to care for him who shall have borne the battle, and for his widow and his orphans, to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and a lasting peace among ourselves and with all nations.
310 psl. - God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him ? Fondly do we hope, fervently do we pray, that this mighty scourge of war may speedily pass away.
310 psl. - The Almighty has His own purposes. "Woe unto the world because of offences! for it must needs be that offences come; but woe to that man by whom the offence cometh!
80 psl. - The Comforter hath found me here, Upon this lonely road; And many thousands now are sad — Wait the fulfilment of their fear; For he must die who is their stay, Their glory disappear. A Power is passing from the earth To breathless Nature's dark abyss...
24 psl. - To the beloved and deplored memory of her who was the inspirer, and in part the author, of all that is best in my writings— the friend and wife whose exalted sense of truth and right was my strongest incitement, and whose approbation was my chief reward— I dedicate this volume.
310 psl. - If we shall suppose that American slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives to both North and South this terrible war as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those divine attributes which the believers in a living God always ascribe to Him?
24 psl. - ... the work, as it stands, has had, in a very insufficient degree, the inestimable advantage of her revision; some of the most important portions having been reserved for a more careful re-examination, which they are now never destined to receive.
16 psl. - Good-by." You are not sending me away empty-handed or alone. I go freighted and laden with happy memories — inexhaustible and unalloyed — of England, its warm-hearted people, and their measureless kindness. Spirits more than twain will cross with me, messengers of your good-will.
56 psl. - Memory of WILLIAM WORDSWORTH, a true Philosopher and Poet, who, by the special gift and calling of Almighty God; whether he discoursed on Man or Nature^ failed not to lift up the heart to holy things, tired not of maintaining the cause of the poor and simple ; and so, in perilous times was raised up, to be a chief minister not only of noblest poesy, but of high and sacred truth, THIS MEMORIAL is placed here by his Friends and Neighbours,.
49 psl. - He made but little comment on your notice of him. Occasionally he would say, as he came to a particular fact, ' That's quite correct ;' or, after reading a quotation from his own works, he would add, ' That's from my writings.' These quotations he read in a way that much impressed me ; it seemed almost as if he was awed by the greatness of his own power, the gifts with which he had been endowed.

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